Is the Seaport ready for 'a New York style hip trendy Mexican restaurant'?

Maybe so, but maybe not one open until 2 a.m.

The Licensing Board today considered an application for a restaurant, to be called Pappa Gallo's, at 283 Summer St. Manager Brad Dalbeck told the board the concept would couple a "sophisticated lounge area" with "interpretations of freshly prepared Mexican cuisine" (with more traditional fare for the less adventurous) catering to thirsty, hungry young professionals from the Financial District and the neighboring convention center.

But Licensing Board Chairman Daniel Pokasksi said it was too early to consider granting the restaurant a liquor license - if it even has one to grant - because the restaurant does not yet have a lease and has not yet met with neighbors, as required by board regulations.

Pokaski held up a packet of letters from nearby residents opposed to a restaurant open to 2 a.m. and expressing concern that the area not become another Lansdowne Street consisting entirely of bars and restaurants. The people who have moved into the area are pioneers, he said, and want to see some other sorts of retail on Summer, he said.

The owner of a nearby building said he thought the proposed restaurant could work but not with a 2 a.m. closing time. He said residents are particularly concerned by a series of one-night events at 283 Summer, which he said are typically "huge parties" that end in "a huge mess," complete with public urination.

Representatives from the mayor's office and City Councilor Bill Linehan said they could not support the proposal until after the company meets with neighbors.

Dalbeck said the project will not go forward unless it has a liquor license. If the city is out - it only has a set number - the company would seek to buy a license from another location.

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Comments

Sorry Pokaski...

But all the "Urban Pioneers" around there were driven out years ago. Oh, and P.S., the "Urban Pioneers" you seem so concerned about tend to love late night ethnic eateries.

I can agree with the 2am

I can agree with the 2am closing time decision *for now*, but if the bar proves to be a good neighbor in terms of noise and crowds, then i see no reason not to extend it in the future.

These people are as much as "urban pioneers" as someone moving to Kendall square.

Also, when is this city going to wake up and realize how ridiculous liquor licenses are?

Nieghborhood Area

I moved into the Fort Point Channel area 15 years ago when there was nothing in the area and I love the way it is developing. I agree it would be great to have a Mexican type restaurant in the neighborhood. we currently have some great restaurants and the more we have the better neighborhood it will become. I love Mexican and as we do not have a good one close to the area I would welcome it. We currently have a restaurant/bar in the neighborhood that has a 2am closing and because of the type clientele it attracts we have had problems in the neighborhood. Cars broken into, fights with the police involved, and petty crimes. For this reason I agree with the "lets wait and see how it is" comment before immediately granting a 2am closing. In reading the comments here some of them do not hold true. Some of you seem to think it is a desolate area, it is not! it is a neighborhood with many residents in it. In the two buildings on Sleeper Street there are 88 units, plus numerous other building including the new FP3 building, Channel Center, the condos on the street before Channel Center, A Street, 300 Summer Street and other buildings which have tenants in them. As far as the parking goes, if we had our own Fort Point Channel parking stickers like the Ladder District / China town South Boston etc has instead of being lumped in with South Boston perhaps parking would be more assessable to us instead of all the "southie people" who work and play in town sitting waiting in line to park in the area. By the way I paid for indoor parking for 10 years before I got rid of my car. I am one of those people who rents a ZIP Car when they need a car, my comments are for the neighborhood people who cannot park their cars because the parking spots are taken up by our South Boston neighbors.

um.

... nearby residents?

maybe I don't spend enough time in the Fort Point area, but pretty much all I think of when I think of that area is businesses everywhere.

There are residents...

Including families with kids. I've done a number of assessments at families' homes there. Kind of funny how pretentious the area has gotten though; they'll apologize on the phone that the only place to park is some $30 garage. So then I park a couple blocks away in Southie. The families are almost all recent transplants to the area, and many are horrified that I 1) walked a few blocks and 2) but isn't Southie just swarming with hoodlums?

eeka...

First you say that "The Families are almost all recent transplants to the area", than you go on to ask the question ..."Isn't Southie just swarming with hoodlums"? You can't have it both ways! Also, you left out that the very reason that these new "transplants" are moving into Southie is because it's been classified as one of the safest neighborhoods in the City of Boston! I'm a Law abiding resident of South Boston and I take exceptional offense to your Characterization of South Boston as "swarming with hoodlums"! Maybe you should join one of our many Youth Programs as a mentor rather than to throw the Neighborhood under the Bus! Shame on you!

Uh, what?

Yes, I was saying that the families I see in the Seaport/Fort Point neighborhood, most of whom are recent transplants to the area, are horrified that I set foot in the Southie part of Southie, which they assume is full of hoodlums. And thanks, but I already have a job working with children and families in Southie/Dorchester/Roxbury/periodically other neighborhoods.

When will Boston learn?

You can't create a thriving urban neighborhood by rolling up the sidewalks at night. Besides, the description of this establishment doesn't make me think of trouble. It sounds too pretentious to draw trouble-makers.

A majority of people moving to urban areas are looking for this sort of nightlife. But there are always a few who move in with the crazy idea that it'll be as peaceful and quiet as the 'burbs. I don't understand the latter group, but we all know they exist. They're in the condos near the South St. Diner. They're near Fenway park, which as been there long before they were born, complaining about the effects of living near Fenway. They're in our cities, ruining our cities.

Please let our cities be cities. People should sort out for themselves where it's best for them to live. If they can't, don't punish innocent urban pursuits for the actions of misguided tranquility seekers.

Don't move above a restaurant if you can't live above a restaurant. Don't move near a train if you can't deal with the sounds a train makes. Don't live in the city if you can't deal with city life, and especially don't try to force the city into your ideal boring bedroom community.

+another 1

I continue to be baffled by these people who move into the city, expecting it to be a quiet suburb. GO BACK TO WESTON!

South Boston waterfront/Seaport/Fort Point Channel

Interesting comments. This area is still changing. I read the post about the urban pioneers being forced out. This is an accurate statement. The artists that lived in the former warehouses and other properties lamented that one day they would be forced out. It's now fact (except for a lucky few). The comment about the new arrivals being dissatisfied with the parking situation is the same all over Boston. Too many cars, not enough spaces. As far as the comment about hoodlums in South Boston, all I can say is stop watching movies like 'The Departed' or reading the numerous books about South Boston. The books are either grossly inaccurate or just plain fiction. Find out for yourselves. We don't bite, just the unleashed dogs!

How to improve the parking situation

The single best way to improve the parking situation: get rid of your car.
Voilá: no parking problem.

The new arrivals are dissatisfied with the parking situation for one reason: they have cars. They want to have their cake and eat it too. All the benefits of a downtown neighborhood (nightlife, proximity to other downtown neighborhoods), plus all the benefits of a suburban neighborhood (ample parking, quiet at night).

If you want to drive every day, and park by your home, live in one of the more suburban neighborhoods of Boston, like Roslindale or West Rox., where you can have a driveway. If you want to live in a downtown neighborhood, one of the benefits is that you shouldn't have to drive every day, so don't waste money owning one. When you really need a car you can get it from Zipcar or wherever you need big stuff from - Ikea, Home Depot...

So that's New York Style Mexican?

The way that name is spelled, it's more like the Italian word for "parrot" than Spanish for "Daddy Rooster" It's spelled 'papa' in Spanish. Wow those New York trendy restaurants have such catchy names.

Plus, as most of the posts have indicated, this address is much more "Fort Point" than "Seaport" district as was implied in the thread title.

as a life long resident of

as a life long resident of South Boston I would love to see the Restaraunt open up. I love Mexican Food! I have no problem with the 2:00am Liquor Liscence. It's way off the beaten path of Southie. What kind of impact could a Restaraunt near the "end" of Southie have? I say none! Geeeez, I wish the good people of Southie would stop opposing revenue/tax generating establishments from opening! We are in hard economic times unless you haven't heard!?!? We could use the revenue!