At least they weren't caught serving cold tea

A Chinatown restaurant caught serving well past its 2 a.m. closing time again was slapped with a one-day license suspension.

A manager at Bubor Cha-Cha, 45 Beach St., told the Boston Licensing Board at a hearing this week he didn't really know why the restaurant was still open at 3:15 a.m. on May 7 - when police issued the eatery a citation - but thought it might have been because the restaurant was short-staffed that night and so was simply slow to fill orders.

Lt. Det. Eric Eversley, however, told the board that around 3 a.m., he saw three people enter the restaurant, get seated and given water and silverware - as 14 other people already in the restaurant continued to tuck into their food. Eversley said the drinks were non-alcoholic.

The restaurant earned a similar citation in October for the same offense; at the time the board issued only a warning. Board Chairwoman Nicole Murati Ferrer said she'd had enough:

"You can't operate past 2 a.m.," she said. "I don't care if you have one chef or 20 chefs, there are no ifs ands or buts."

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The poster's point is that

The poster's point is that there is limited manpower in the police force, and that some types of crimes are more deserving of attention than others. Triage, it is called. Please don't pretend that this is not a basic truth of the world we live in.

Triage happens higher up the chain

I'm confident in the police department's ability to do triage appropriately.

I am also a strong believer in the broken window theory, and evidence has shown that when police stay after the small stuff it tends to make a huge improvement in quality-of-life and people's feelings of safety in the streets. Look at Bratton's experience in NYC, for example.

I also believe in the broken

I also believe in the broken window theory.

And in this example, the police are citing someone for fixing a window without the proper permit.

Having a business be open, with foot traffic, makes the area safer.

What's the big deal?

South Street Diner is opened 24hrs. That's about the only place I can think of in the area to get food at the crazy hours of 3:00am. Why not let places stay opened later, generate more profits, and of course, pay taxes? The text here says they weren't serving alcohol, so what is wrong with serving food to some hungry people?

The Reason

As a neighbor to a restaurant for the past 18+ years - you have good operators and bad operators (right now we have one of the best). Unfortunately, you get people operating until the wee hours of the night in a mixed use neighborhood and they are emptying trash (bottles are the worst), employees leaving make all kinds of noise from talking to starting up their motorcycles to go home and any number of other things. I too have lamented the lack of early morning restaurants from time to time - but you need to be careful where they are located - if you stick to commercial locations - no problem, but one thing I've learned over the years is that a) the residents have to respect the business' right to make a living (for example, tolerating the occasional delivery vehicle blocking the alley/your driveway etc. as long as it's quick), but the business has to respect the right of the resident to have a clean quiet street. If you can meet those simple goals you have an excellent relationship. If you don't - it can be miserable for everybody. Unfortunately, the businesses are notorious offenders of the rules and the residents have very little they can do about offenses (I can't even imagine BPD responding to noise complaints - I've tried but in their defense I know most of the time they have much bigger things to worry about).

We're not NY

If I wanted to live in NY, I'd move there. We seem to have a lot of apple envy around here - news flash, we will never be NY - if we spent more time figuring out how to make Boston different and better than NY instead of trying to turn it into the Little Apple on the Charles we'd have a such a great product we wouldn't have to give all those tax breaks to companies to move and stay here. We have so many advantages over NY, but instead we try to be the low cost provider (except to the residents in which case we are becoming a high cost provider).

I live in the neighorhood

Which is why I posted what I did. I still have the feeling of "Let them operate". I didn't move into Chinatown expecting to have a quiet residence, be able to park wherever/whenever I pleased, or keep businesses from making money. I moved here for the easy access to red, green, orange, and silver lines. The location is about midway between my work, and school. So the late night noise is really just an occurence I must deal with in order to have convenience.

Port Authority, Driver. Home's my Destination....

This long-running debate always reminds me of the Mighty Bosstones' "Almost Anything Goes".

I grew up around New York. I chose to hang my hat on a hook that's not so active. Others are free to choose otherwise, but don't no one wake me up till I'm near Park Street Station.

I found out a long time ago that while things around here are not perfect by any stretch, this is a pretty damn good place to live. If it weren't, we'd look a lot more like the rust belt, because this isn't usually offered as a stop on the Fabulous Weather of America Tour (although, I'll admit, I like the weather here, too).