And that, kids, is why headlines are no joking matter

Staffers at the Suffolk Journal this week learned one of the most important rules of print journalism: If you put in a joke headline, you're going to forget to take it out and it will run and boy are you going to regret it.

In today's issue of The Journal, we published an inappropriate sub-headline in the article "SLI Involvement Fair a success." We want to apologize profusely for the mistake and make it clear that we in no way harbor ill feelings towards the Student Leadership and Involvement Office, nor any of the students and staff that work there. The sub-head was put in as a joke, by editors, that unfortunately slipped through our editing process later in the night. We want to make it clear that the reporter who wrote the article had no idea or anything to do with the subhead.

And just what did they write? See for yourself.

H/t, Dan.

Neighborhoods: 

Topics: 

Free tagging: 

Comments

Captions, too

Caption placeholder text has been known to be forgotten, as well. I once saw a clipout from a local newspaper that showed a high school basketball team picture. All of the names were listed in the caption except for "some f***er" (his number was obscured by the person standing in front of him)

Only time I ever heard of an editor yelling "Stop the presses!"

Long ago at a suburban newspaper (not the one I worked at, although it's now part of the same chain), a copy editor screwing around used a caption to jokingly refer to some local guy he couldn't stand as "noted neo-Nazi so and so ..." Then forgot to take it out.

Somebody noticed the caption as the paper was well into its press run for the morning. The editor in chief ran into the press room screaming "Stop the presses! Stop the presses!" And then he sent all the reporters out to stop the delivery trucks that were already bringing the first edition to stores.

Lorem Ipsum is not Spanish

A few years back, there was a school system that sent out a letter to Spanish-reading parents that was Lorem Ipsem ... the secretary thought it was the Spanish translation.

OOPS!