Big-time bail for convicted rapist charged with raping another woman on Beacon Hill

Boston Municipal Court Judge Mark Hart Summerville set bail at $1 million for Anthony Williams, charged with forcing his way into a Beacon Hill residence and raping its occupant, the Suffolk County District Attorney's office reports.

Should Williams, convicted of a 1996 rape in Salem, make bail, he'll still sit behind bars, because Summerville revoked his bail on an unrelated assault-and-battery charge.

The DA's office provided the following account of the alleged attack and Williams's capture:

[Assistant District Attorney Holly] Broadbent told the court that Williams followed the 28-year-old victim into her Beacon Hill apartment building as she returned home sometime after 2 a.m. on Nov. 10 and forced his way into her apartment. There, he allegedly threatened repeatedly to kill her, held a kitchen knife to her throat, and sexually assaulted her, prosecutors said.

After the assault, Williams allegedly tied the victim's hands behind her and then tied her to a piece of kitchen cabinetry. He demanded the PIN number for her bank card and told her he would return and kill her if she gave him a phony number. Williams then left the apartment with the victim's iPhone, iPad, jewelry, and ATM card, according to prosecutors.

The victim was able to free herself and went to a neighbor's apartment to call for help. Though unable to describe the assailant's face, she was able to provide police with a detailed description of his clothing, including a tan construction jacket with a darker collar and a large, dark backpack.

According to prosecutors, Boston Police obtained surveillance images from two ATMs where Williams used the victim's bank card – one near the victim's apartment and the second in Dorchester. Still images were distributed to staff at local homeless shelters as well as to the public. An employee at one shelter contacted police and identified the man in the photo as Williams, whom she knew from his stays at the shelter, prosecutors said.

Detectives also teamed with the U.S. Marshals to track the victim's stolen iPhone to a local business in Dorchester, where the owner said he had purchased it on Nov. 10 from a man who regularly sells items at the business. Surveillance video from the business corroborated the owner's story, and he identified Williams' picture from a photo array, according to prosecutors.

Williams was arrested yesterday at an address in Dorchester where he was visiting his mother.

Innocent, etc.

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    Comments

    Dealing in Stolen Property

    So can the state also go after the business which purchased the stolen phone for dealing in stolen goods? If this guy comes in frequently to "sell items" (including a working iPhone with an active service contract) isn't this grounds for showing he would have had to assumed it was stolen?

    Not like that would have prevented this rape but why stop with just one criminal.

    As someone who's sat in Judge

    As someone who's sat in Judge Summerville's courtroom I can tell you that this is par for the course for him. I've seen him impose sentences at plea hearings that were greater than the prosecutions recommendation even. He's one of the few judge's in suffolk county who is tough on crime.

    That won't work

    Rape is not a sex crime.

    Repeat.

    Rape is not about sex - it is about power and degradation.

    Repeat.

    Or, you could JFGI and get the studies and validated scientific information.

    Half sentence for castration would simply mean that you would still have a violent home invader out on the streets in half the time ... and that person would still break in to people's houses and rape (or kill) the occupants.

    Besides, it is much easier to definitively identify a rapist when they leave behind genetic material.

    Castration will make a male

    Castration will make a male less aggressive due to decreased testosterone. And of course rapist have psychological issues, many are sadist [as are serial killers].

    If we have a bonafide repeat offender, what's the appropriate sentence? In olden times he would of course have been hanged on the common. We're to cultured and sophisticated these days for that.