Domino's to deliver later in Allston

The Boston Licensing Board voted today to let the Allston Domino's deliver pizzas up to 3 a.m. seven nights a week.

The Domino's had only been allowed to send its drivers out that late on Fridays and Saturdays; the board agreed with the franchise owner there's a public need for early morning pizza.

Last year, the board allowed a Brighton Avenue pizza place to deliver that late as well; a consultant from the franchise told the board yesterday Allstonians could already get early morning stuffed cheesy bread from its outlets in the Fenway and Roxbury. The Allston Civic Association opposed the extension of hours, saying even Allston residents have a right to uninterrupted sleep.

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Running tally?

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Just curious if there's a full archive of decisions from the ACA and the subsequent decisions from the Licensing Board.

I'd be curious whether there is a statistical correlation between the ACA decisions and the board decisions on the same matter.

Do you think that woman in the video will now cry herself to sleep every night...only to be woken by the sounds of a 3 AM pizza delivery!

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I'd say check UHub archives

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But they're incredibly slow to load to the browser. Adam?

I mentioned yesterday that it seems as though the Boston Licensing Board has had a tendency to resist the NIMBYism of the ACA, thankfully. This will be another example.

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I need more than just those

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I'm going to give Berkeley the benefit of doubt and say that for every 1 we hear about here, there are 4-5 examples where they turn someone down (or approve them) and the Licensing Board agrees...and we don't hear about it here.

So, in order to understand the full statistics I need all of the results (or many of them) to see all of the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative agreements between the ACA and Licensing Board.

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Don't think there's anything comprehensive

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Based on my (admittedly imperfect) memory and some agendas I have still:

Boston Kabob 11pm -> 2am close request (ACA - Oppose, suggesting midnight or compromise instead; Board - granted 1am close instead).

Russian Benevolent Society license change (ACA - Oppose, Board - Support)

Buk Kyung/Refuge Cafe expansion (ACA - Support, Board - Support)

Regina Pizza Allston 2am close (I think this was supported, but I can't quite remember)

Breakfast Club expansion (ACA - Support, Board - Support)

Deep Ellum expansion (ACA - Support, Board - Support)

Blue Asia Café, 113 Brighton Ave. Request to extend hours of operation from 9:30P.M. to 12:00A.M. (ACA - Support)

Brighton Music Hall, 154 Brighton Ave. Allston Request to increase capacity. (ACA - Support)

Russian Benevolent Society, 16-20 Linden St. Allston Request to remove all provisos attached to restaurant proposal and increase space by 2700 sq. ft. (Paul split it into 3 proposals, ACA supported only 1 (increase space I think). Licensing board did approve daily operation.)

Shabu Shabu Restaurant, 121-123 Brighton Ave. Allston Request to transfer B & W license from Back Bay to new restaurant at location. (IIRC the ACA did support this)

Common Ground Cafe Harvard Ave. Request to amend existing Entertainment License (ACA - Support)

Dominos Pizza, Cambridge St. Allston. Propsal to extend delivery hours to 3AM 7 days per week. (ACA - Oppose, Board - Support)

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Pizzeria Regina 2am was

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Pizzeria Regina 2am was supported by the ACA.

Shabu Shabu Restaurant, 121-123 Brighton Ave. Allston Request to transfer B & W license from Back Bay to new restaurant at location: The ACA did support this, despite constantly harping on about how they don't want new alcohol licenses in Allston (which is a good way to keep the value of licenses IN Allston sky-high... not sure who benefits)

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So, Kaz

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Worked out any correlation with a good r^2?

:)

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Ha

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Nah...it's just too little data over too short of a time period to be predictive based on what we've collected here (and elsewhere on UHub). Oh well. Maybe the ACA should get an archivist.

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Yes!

(Expletive) you, Berkeley!

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Well...

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...locals wanted this rejected.

It's fine and well to say, "well this is the city and there's going to be some noise," but from the POV of locals, they are suffering from death by a thousand cuts. Consider: once you could have some peace and quiet over night, but in the intervening years, these same kind of decisions have been made over and over and over again. At each step, Allston became noisier, dirtier, less calm and sedate.

And at each and every step, these decisions accommodate one and only one group of people - students. You think eventually locals might just start saying, "enough?!"

So when did students become the sole group of people there whose needs are looked after? When did they become of the opinion that they "owned" Allston?

People might try to consider all of that. Students are visitors and transients in Allston, it's *not* their home.

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Some locals wanted this rejected

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The ACA vote was not unanimous - and only members of the board can vote (you have to go to three ACA meetings to become a board member). Was the same deal with Stone Hearth Pizza - the ACA officially opposed that place as well.

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How can pizza delivery damage a neighborhood's peace and quiet?

A car pulls up. Someone gets out of the car and rings a doorbell. The customer hands the driver money and receives a pizza. The driver gets back in the car and goes somewhere else. How does this hurt a neighborhood in any way?

(And also, why do you think that only students have pizzas delivered to them?)

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Here's how

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From the woman from whose testimony I extracted one of the videos:

They slam their car doors when getting out. Just as bad, especially on Allston's narrow streets, the driver double parks, then somebody else comes up behind him, can't move, so starts blowing his horn to get the driver to move.

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I can't tell you how often!!!

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I can't tell you how often delivery car doors and blocked traffic have disturbed me between midnight and 3 AM every night!!!

...because it's never happened.

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I didn't say...

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...that students were the *only* ones having late deliveries. But inasmuch as students outnumber locals by about 100 to 1, it's in an entirely different league.

This narrative is rather odd, because it implies that students cause no ill effects to the locals, but if the locals try to block another "student-oriented" thing, there's something not quite right about them It's wrong and unfair to think that.

Also: I can pretty much state that most adult locals who might order for delivery at 2-3 AM won't be having large, noisy get-togethers. Students DO. A complete different dynamic. The late-night deliveries just adds to the noise and disturbances.

As I'd said, it's a death by a thousand cuts. Each time, there's always some petty rationalization why this is "OK" without end. I can further state that as an Allston local, with family roots there, I've been watching this same sort of thing happen for 30 years without end.

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Then call the police

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Large noisy get-togethers at 3am are illegal. Why take it out on some poor pizza delivery guy just trying to get by?

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At each step

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Allston gets more commerce and more economic vitality. Neighborhoods change, nothing remains the same. It's better to try to adapt and take advantage of the changes, than to throw a fit. Trying to pretend all your problems are caused by students, and attempting to cordon them off is a recipe for disaster.

If you would take off your blinders for one moment, you would realize that locals wanted 3am delivery. At least 8 came to support it (that could vote) and several spoke in favor of it.

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Hmm...

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I trust you understand that the "economic vitality" you speak of is virtually all restaurants, convenience stores, bars; that's a very weak and superficial "vitality" indeed. And 95% of the housing stock is now taken up by students.

Which was my entire point. This isn't a one-off thing, this is just another step leading towards driving all locals out. Because the narrative is continually "accommodate the students" and very little in favor of locals. One wonders where the "hey, perhaps this is too much" moment is going to occur, because near as I have ever seen, it literally never has happened.

Yes, neighborhoods "change," but this is a virtual take-over by BU. That "change" is imposed on the area from outside, as it were.

And tell you the truth, compared to all of the families and working folk who used to reside there, trust me, this is a false "vitality" indeed.

No blinders here, thanks.

Anyways, I'll cease flogging this dead horse. I think it's about as tenderized as it's going to get.

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You're overestimating students

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There's corners of Allston where it's mostly students, but I've also met a lot of non-students in Allston. I remember asking one 40 year old why she liked to live on Harvard Ave. She said: "because there's so much to do there."

Yes, there's a bunch of restaurants, bars, and convenience stores. There's also a variety of different ethnic markets (Japanese, Korean, Brazilian and Russian), bakeries, cafes, clothing stores, auto parts stores, furniture stores, pet stores, and weird little shops of arcane things that I have no idea about.

And that's in a relatively small area. Nowadays, it has to compete with the inexorable trend of online shopping. It's not going to be like the 1950s ever again.

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Sorry...

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But you're death by a thousand cuts argument would hold a lot more ground if the entire city didn't have about 2 late night options.

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