"No Room for Wishing," a documentary play about Occupy Boston

Local theatre artist Danny Bryck performs his one-man documentary play "No Room for Wishing," chronicling the story of the occupation of Dewey Square, using the exact words of the people involved. Co-produced by Company One and Central Square Theater, playing at the Boston Center for the Arts this weekend and Central Square Theater 9/30-10/9.

Compiled from interviews and live recordings during the occupation of Dewey Square in Fall 2011, "No Room for Wishing" follows Occupy Boston from its formation, through clashes with the police, infighting among the activists, legal battles and collective victories, to its eviction by the City of Boston. One of Boston’s most dynamic young theater makers portrays dozens of real-life characters in this fiercely immediate, up-close-and-personal encounter with our city, our nation, and ourselves. Through the words of students, activists, bankers, medics, soldiers, lawyers and the homeless, "No Room for Wishing" asks, "What happens when you try to reinvent society?"

This weekend only, use the code C1DEWEY for $15 tickets to a performance Edge Boston calls, "a marvel to behold." A post-show discussion follows every performance.

Read this preview in the Boston Globe: http://articles.boston.com/2012-09-13/theater-art/... and click here for more information, the full schedule, and to purchase tickets! http://companyone.org/Season14/No_Room_for_Wishing...

No Room for Wishing runs through 9/22 at the Boston Center for the Arts Plaza Black Box Theatre, 539 Tremont Street in the South End, and for six shows 9/30-10/9 at Central Square Theater, 450 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge.

http://dannybryck.com/noroomforwishing

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Comments

Quick Summary

The Occupy Boston movement was a group of people who were angry that their country had become a corrupt corporatocracy. They decided to occupy a godforsaken patch of Boston on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in an act of civil disobedience. Initially the authorities tolerated the movement, and even tacitly supported it. Then the authorities grew tired of the action and demanded they go away. Then they went away without so much as a whimper. The end.

i've heard

the show is pretty much just him eating donated pizza, snorting dope, and taking a birdbath out of a mockup of the south station men's room.

REVOLUTION

Infantile anon comments aside

I saw this last weekend, and I think most people would agree that the show isn't a glamorization of "Occupy Boston" or what happened last year down in Dewey Square. It's more of a documentary, with the writer/actor re-living the words of some of those who were part of OB last year in an interesting progression. He even includes some of the less savory aspects of OB and the issues they faced with addicts and homeless.

One could patronize a local artist and local theater companies to see for themselves, or they can sit behind computers and anonymity and make snide comments about nothing in particular. I recommend the former.

this play is a great resource

The play was superbly acted, with Danny Bryck portraying 30 diverse characters, showing the humanity behind the politics, and how humans are- as Aristotle said- political animals. I think people of all political views would learn a lot by watching this with an open mind; and also learn from the discussion after each show. It is not enough to form opinions from the overly reduced news we are all forced to digest; or certainly not enough to live on our own regurgitated, predigested views that color our own perception of the world. As Socrates said, the unexamined life is not worth living. You need to make a bit of effort to examine the life outside your personal domain. This play is a great resource