Proposed Cleveland Circle project would make trucks just disappear

ClevelandCircle.org notices an unusual assertion in the filings by the developer of the proposed retail/hotel/residential complex on the old Circle Cinema site: it doesn't seem to show many truck deliveries. The 82 residential units supposedly would generate just one delivery-truck visit a day - which would mean they can get mail but not FedEx or UPS deliveries, visits from Peapod, movers, dry cleaners, WH Mason, etc.

The post is illustrated with a photo taken last week at an 81-unit residential building.

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    So what else is new , all

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    So what else is new , all these businesses mostly never have a delivery plan. Never enough loading zones, or big enough ones.Loading docks are a thing of the past.

    Or, how about...

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    the US does what the rest of the world does and prohibits large trucks everywhere but highways? Create more jobs, get huge things out of the city where they don't belong, make cheap-plastic-shit-that-breaks-immediately less feasible.

    You didn't quantify "large".

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    You didn't quantify "large". But there are going to be deliveries one way or the other. Even if it's small trucks or Ford Transit-type vans, they still need to plan for loading space.

    Howard Stein Hudson design failed math

    The traffic engineers at "complete streets" advocates Howard Stein Hudson didn't multiply the truck traffic rates by the square footages. Worse, they don't seem to check their work, and hoped nobody else would. Of course, its all to get a big project done and pretend that there won't be an increase in traffic congestion.

    BTW, the truck rates are really old and are all pre-Internet web ordering.

    Road designers mostly support complete streets because the added, useless features increase project costs and profits, with only the appearance of increased safety. Studies show fewer accidents for very few of the features. The most effective accident reducer are raised medians.

    Obsessive Comment

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    Road designers mostly support complete streets because the added, useless features increase project costs and profits, with only the appearance of increased safety. Studies show fewer accidents for very few of the features. The most effective accident reducer are raised medians.

    Sources, please.

    Try Google and TRB searches

    National database of crash modification factors
    http://www.cmfclearinghouse.org/advsearch.cfm

    A table of the only ones that work:
    http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/tools/crf/resources/bri...

    Five years and no takers for a study:
    "A number of pedestrian treatments have been developed for inclusion in intersection design over the years but research data that provides conclusive information about their effectiveness is lacking."
    http://rns.trb.org/dproject.asp?n=13451
    http://rns.trb.org/dproject.asp?n=12655

    http://pubsindex.trb.org/view.aspx?id=492026
    http://pubsindex.trb.org/view.aspx?id=847906