Citizen complaint of the day: Yankees suck

An outraged citizen reports from E. 4 St. in South Boston:

Spent 1.5 hours shoveling my elderly grandfather out in Southie. This New Yorker comes along and moves his statue and takes his spot! Give him a nice fat ticket courtesy of Menino! Yankees suck!

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It's a matter of principle!

Our forefathers fought a revolutionary war to drive the British out of South Boston. They then reserved the carriage spaces left behind with broken harpsichords and indentured servants who pissed them off.

This stuff is even in the Bible: "Though shalt not covet a parking spot thou didst shovel not, unlesseth thou is the pizza delivery guy or UPS because then thou is only gonna be there for a minute or two, tops, and everybody else needs to chilleth the fuck out already."

(I'm being facetious, but I've had conversations with space savers that have been only marginally more coherent)

Tories Suck!

LET US NO FORGET WHOSE SIDE THE RESIDENTS OF NEW YORK WERE ON DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR!

WILL THE HEGEMONIC VILLAINY OF THE TORIES EVER END?

There's an old couple on my street.

Probably the oldest couple on the whole block. It pisses me off to no end when someone parks in front of their building. The wife is handicapped and needs much assistance to get into the building they live in. The husband isn't in much better shape. Usually I'll throw people's space savers onto the sidewalk, put them in the trash, or stack them up and move them out of the way. These people I don't mess with though.

Where did you get this information?

This is not true, there are 3 handicap spots on my block, 2 on one side of the street and one on the other. The only restriction (on a legally handicap spot) is if you have a driveway/off street parking the City will not issue a handicap spot. Also the parking spot is not just for you, anyone with a placard can park there.

You can have both

One street over from me, there are two houses with handicapped spots on the public street in front of the houses. The houses have driveways too.

It is odd for a house with a driveway that goes right up to the side door of the house to have a handicapped spot on the public street in front of the house. It's just a few steps from the driveway to the side door while its many more steps from the street to the front door.

Usually handicapped parking means spots closest to the building, not farther.

"New Yorker"

Meaning "I assume this person was born in NY even though they have been here since 1980".

Get grandpa a handicapped spot and nobody else can park there. Or, help grandpa move into a nice building with covered parking. Otherwise, go fish.

Or freeze...

Friend born and raised in Charlestown told me a Southie story:

Guy pulls up and parks in somebody's marked spot. Gets out with a suitcase and gets in a cab that he called - most likely on his way to the airport. One guy witnesses this and whistles to everybody shoveling to come over, explains what he saw and they proceed to bury the guy's car in snow. It's forecast to be bitterly cold so they proceed to get out the garden hose and spray down the guy's car. Several days later he returns to find an iceburg where he left his car.

Now that's cold!

Devil's Advocate

-It's entirely possible that they are new or just visiting friends and do not know the unwritten rules of snow parking. They might even agree that if you shovel it out, it's your spot once they learn about it. Believe it or not, but people outside of Boston don't actually operate this way when it comes to parking - possessive of property they don't actually own regardless of the weather - however, they aren't all total animals with a lack of respect for assimilating either.

-It's entirely possible that said NY person is not from NYC and doesn't give two craps about the Yankees. Not everyone from NY is/does. And frankly, what does baseball have to do with how one parks?

-As for the handicapped grandfather part, perhaps if a calm, nice note - i.e. devoid of exclamation marks, threats, or nasty insinuations - was left saying something to the effect of 'I'm sorry, you probably didn't know this but the man who lives here has trouble getting around, so the neighborhood tries to keep this spot open for him if possible. His name is George, come over and say hi sometime.' They might actually abide and reciprocate the respect and politeness.

The Southie is not strong with this one

As for the handicapped grandfather part, perhaps if a calm, nice note - i.e. devoid of exclamation marks, threats, or nasty insinuations - was left saying something to the effect of 'I'm sorry, you probably didn't know this but the man who lives here has trouble getting around, so the neighborhood tries to keep this spot open for him if possible. His name is George, come over and say hi sometime.'

Yeah, but if he had the level of awareness, interpersonal skills, persuasive ability, and general effectiveness that such a note would imply, then he wouldn't fit in with the old neighborhood and probably wouldn't be living there.

The complaint may be poorly

The complaint may be poorly written but I think what he means is that someone moved his father's space saver and parked a car with NY plates there. Space saving aside, if it has out of state plates then how can it have a legal parking sticker? "Snow parking rules" are irrelevant. A ticket would be deserved in this case, and that's all he's asking.

It's also possible that the

It's also possible that the evil New Yorkers do know about the "rules of parking" and simply don't give a shit. It's really pretty simple: One doesn't shovel out a spot; he shovels out his car so that he can drive of in his car. If he doesn't want to lose the parking spot, then he shouldn't drive his car away.