DA: One of the alleged Broadway attackers hates yuppies

McCarthy

Four of five suspects in the Red Line beatings that sent a man to the hospital on March 9 were arraigned yesterday on charges of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Among them, Kevin McCarthy (booking photo on right), about whom the Suffolk County District Attorney's office says:

McCarthy was convicted last year of taking part in the group beating of three men in the early morning hours of May 8, 2011. Suffolk prosecutors recommended three to five years in state prison followed by probation at his sentencing; a Suffolk Superior Court judge imposed two years in a house of correction with six months to serve and the balance suspended for two years. He and his co-defendants in that case shouted at the victims, "You [expletive] yuppie, you’re not from Southie" while beating them.

A fifth suspect, a 20-year-old man from South Boston, has been identified and is expected to be arraigned on March 21, the DA's office says.

The DA's office also reported that there were actually five Rhode Island teenagers - ranging in age from 14 to 18 - who sprung to the aid of a man attacked by another group of people on a Red Line train as it approached Broadway:

The ongoing investigation by MBTA Transit Police suggests that the incident was sparked by a brief exchange of words between the 40-year-old victim and the defendants' group. That led to a physical attack by the defendants on that victim. When the younger victims stepped in to break up the attack, they, too, were attacked, the evidence suggests.

The initial victim, 40, was taken to Tufts Medical Center with serious injuries, the DA's office says, adding the teens were checked by EMTs at Broadway station, but did not require hospitalization.

South Boston District Court Judge Michael Bolden declined to order additional bail for any defendant, releasing Micahel Davis of Quincy and Kristine Mullen of South Bostonon personal recognizance, Patrick Joyce of Dorchester on $400, and McCarthy on $500, the DA's office reports. Bolden did order the four to stay away from the T and not contact the victims while their cases are pending, but declined a request from prosecutors that they also refrain from drinking.

Prosecutors referred McCarthy's case to the probation department, which could seek to have his probation revoked because of the latest arrest.

Innocent, etc.

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Comments

I think I'm just going to be

By on

I think I'm just going to be a professional criminal. It seems like no judges in Massachusetts care about locking up anyone.

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It would be so much better if

It would be so much better if we could just stick people in jail for 20 years and then have them come out skill-less with even more criminal knowledge.

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Ya because

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letting people commit crime without consequence will surely get them to turn their lives around.

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For the vast majority of

For the vast majority of crimes there are consequences, consequences that often are heavy handed (ie. War on Drugs). But you're right...Deval PAtrICK, EBT, my LAwn,,,

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WOW

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What a response!

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This is the liberal version

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This is the liberal version of posting "THANKS OBAMA BLAH BLAH BLAH LIBTARDS AND MOONBATS" on Boston Herald articles about local politics. You're literally just as stupid as those people.

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I think there might be some

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I think there might be some middle ground in between. I think telling these guys not to drink while their case is pending wasn't THAT unreasonable of a request by the prosecution.

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Corruption is the word of the day...

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Setting drug and alcohol restrictions is commonplace for this type of release/case, especially where assault and alcohol are involved, which clearly has been the case with ALL of the cases involving these trashy thugs. The judge needs a good lookin into... Corrupt or a really poor judge of character...oddly enough. Or maybe it was that girls pouty lip that tugged on his...um...heart. ;/

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A few questions.

What will your view be if a person, such as Kevin, is kept out of prison, and ends up killing someone?

Also, what's to say a person in prison can't pursue some type of technical training, or even work on earning an online college degree? I have volunteered time to tutor adults at the South Bay House of Correction. They even offer GED prep for those who haven't completed high school:
http://www.scsdma.org/programs/inmatePrograms.shtml

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Where is the 6th Attacker

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Everyone busy arguing about yuppies vs. born and raised and the leniency of the Courts but no one has asked nor has the MBTA explained what has happened to the so called 6th attacker?

I wonder who her daddy is? Is the MBTA in need of some federal favors?

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Where is the 6th Attacker

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Everyone busy arguing about yuppies vs. born and raised and the leniency of the Courts but no one has asked nor has the MBTA explained what has happened to the so called 6th attacker?

I wonder who her daddy is? Is the MBTA in need of some federal favors?

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so this McCarthy has..

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already been incarcerated for beating strangers in what should be considered a hate crime, and he gets $500 bail for allegedly putting another stranger in the hospital with severe injuries?

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not a hate crime

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please don't dilute the meaning to cover your own agenda

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That's great

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$500 bail and you don't even have to stop drinking. He's on probation, he should be in jail.

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Rull sounds familiar

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Is McCarthy's former assailant-in-crime, Kevin Rull Jr., related to current Marty Walsh aide and Boston Chief of Operations Joe Rull? And Whitey Bulger's real estate attorney Dan Rull?

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Trust me...

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he wouldn't have made it out of the courtroom today if he was from another neighborhood! The grounds for revoking his probation have already been met...he was arrested and is being charged with a crime...nuff said, revoked! But no, not this pretty white boy from Southie, not his pouty lipped white girl side kickeither (obviously mommy and daddy made some phone calls), or the other thugs involved... It's ridiculous that this POS walked out of that courtroom and onto the street tonight! LOCK your doors if you have to drive through, and block your nose, too...Something stinks in Southie!

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the sooner this tough-guy

the sooner this tough-guy townie culture gets priced out of southie and other hoods around here, the better for everyone.

good riddance.

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Naah,

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..it's usually either some embezzlement thing or a male yuppie flips out and kills the female over some infidelity problem.

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Naah,

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..it's usually either some embezzlement thing or a male yuppie flips out and kills the female over some infidelity problem.

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Typical yuppie crimes

Putting recyclables in the regular trash.

Buying conventionally-grown when organic is right there next to it.

Blasting Dave Matthews Band at their patio parties.

Voting Republican when they owe their head start in life to liberal government programs like Pell grants, student loans, the home mortgage interest deduction, and their dad's or grandfather's GI Bill education.

Using beach chairs for space savers. That just screams "Moved to Southie last month."

And the worst: Wearing boat shoes. Can you believe boat shoes?

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*cough* insidertrading

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*cough* insidertrading-investinginchildlaboroverseas-hiringundoccedworkersthentreatingthemlikeslaves *cough*

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amen

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amen to that.

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While I certainly understand

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While I certainly understand your point of view, it's a shame you're cheering for people who have lived in an area their whole lives - born and raised in the area you now want them to move from. This guy is a criminal and should be put away, I'm not defending him in any way. But you seem to relish the though of all the "townies" to be priced out of their neighborhoods. What about the lower/middle class families that only know that neighborhood, living their lives, raising their familes in the neighborhoods they were raised, are you cheering for them to get priced out as well? And what happens to them when they do?

Would you say the same about sections of Blue Hill Ave?

I know you're feeling a bit cocky, what with the Parade just being over and all, but are you this insensitive?

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Gentrification is indeed tough on renters

They're the ones that get priced out of the neighborhood by rising real estate values as landlords are able to demand higher rents. Everybody on my block of Southie owns the homes they grew up in, many inherited from parents or grandparents, mortgage-free, and the higher taxes aren't crushing them (assessments usually trail resale values by quite a bit). Gentrification means a huge eventual payoff or a fat rental income stream for them, should they ever decide to move.

Meanwhile, the new yuppies are fixing up old, decrepit properties, and their presence spurs new businesses like restaurants and shops to open in the neighborhood, further improving the value of their neighbors' homes. It's not all bad news for longtime locals.

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Well, I can't defend the

Well, I can't defend the exact tone of the cho-kettie's comment, I can understand their frustration.

I live in a very Italian neighborhood in Boston (not the North End, that's not the only one), and my wife and I had saved our whole lives to buy our first home in the city of Boston, rather than some affordable but far-flung exurb. We didn't inherit our house, like 75% of our neighbors did, we worked our whole lives for it and went way into debt for it, and even then could only afford it because we bought in at the bottom of the 2009 market after renting in various 'hoods in Boston, Somerville, and Watertown for years and years. We didn't happen into this neighborhood, this city, by sheer chance. We weren't born here, we love this fucking city and chose to be here.

But because we weren't born here, we aren't welcome at the neighborhood meetings or the neighborhood watch. Because we're not Italian, it's utterly clear that we aren't welcome here at all. At least we get the benefit of being white. I feel terrible for our handful of Hispanic and Haitian neighbors, who have to listen to the open racial slurs and feel the hostility and suspicion every time there's a crime near here.

Am I a yuppie? Yeah, probably. I work behind a desk now (although I worked for many years with a shovel, and then later with a truck). I am on salary. But I will never in my life be able to afford living in one of Boston's rich neighborhoods. So I can choose between either living in a neighborhood that hates me in the city that I love, or moving out to friggin Natick or some other suburban cesspool.

So anyway, I can understand why someone might be angry with the townie culture that feels justified in beating someone down for not living in the same neighborhood they were born in.

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Natick = "Suburban cesspool"?

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I understand that you'd rather live in urban Boston than one of the
many suburban towns surrounding Boston but equating Natick as a
"suburban cesspool" is very much "out there". Unless you're being
sarcastic and I misinterpreted your meaning.

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That's like saying....

Strip malls and tract homes as far as the eye can see. I'm sure some people love it. I don't.

Well, if you want to be myopic, that's like saying Boston is all projects. Or all Beacon Hill WASP snobs. Or all South End yups. Take your pick.

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I've been to Natick

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I remember a large town square surrounded by local businesses and blocks of beautiful old houses.

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Is Eastie still Italian?

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You are talking about East Boston right? I take the Blue Line through EB daily and occasionally will take the bus to Maverick from Revere and from my observation EB seems to be predominately Hispanic now.

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I was talking about Readville

I was talking about Readville.

East Boston is only still Italian in the minds of a few older Italian ladies who live there. The mix of fantastic Italian, Brazilian, and Salvadoran/other Central American restaurants makes it one of the best neighborhoods to dine out in, though.

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;0)

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Well said (except the smack to Natick...lol...but I totally get your point!)

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Bigotry can't be defended.

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Bigotry can't be defended. The question that needs to be asked is do you like the city simply because of the buildings and history, or is it also the character and culture? If it's the later, a large part of that comes from the people who have built the neighborhoods for generations, and it's less so with more transplants. Has anyone actually articulated to you that you aren't welcome, and have they given an explicit reason? That seems doubtful. Perhaps your neighbors your neighbors know you are young transplant, and they figure you will only be living in the neighborhood for a short while, as so many do.

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Well, make it a middle-aged

Well, make it a middle-aged transplant. I've lived around here for 17 years, so I don't think anyone's going to mistake me for a clueless college kid just here until finals are over. I find your comment about character and culture hilarious. I've written articles about Boston's history and culture, led tours of several Boston neighborhoods, and given classes on Boston's history. I probably know more about the patterns of migration, development, and degradation that shaped Boston's current cultural stew than a lot of people who grew up here. And that's kind of my point. I fell in love with this city, and made a conscious choice to spend my life here.

And yes, people have articulated that we aren't welcome. Like after we bought the house on our block that was falling down and spent two years fixing it up to be (mostly) presentable, and the lady walking by while I was planting the garden said what a shame it was that we had bought the house and not a nice Italian family (presumably, much like the nice Italian family that had let the house practically rot to pieces). Never mind our hard work, just too bad we're not Italian. And this isn't exactly the South End, where richie rich comes to rent a townhouse for two years while they finish up their graduate work. This is a family oriented neighborhood, where we don't exactly get a lot of transients. Most people here wouldn't know I'm not originally from the Boston area, unless I tell them. I don't have a placeable accent; in fact, I've been here long enough for my Rs to drop a bit here and there. I also don't want anyone to get the wrong idea; not everyone in the neighborhood tries to freeze us out. We get along well with a lot of families we've met.

I don't know what it is I'm asking for exactly. A little goodwill, I suppose.

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Boston is more than it's old

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Boston is more than it's old buildings and colonial history. You either appreciate the tight knit neighborhoods and that fact that people grew up knowing each other, or you don't. Sometimes people are narrow minded, but that does not mean entire communities should be denigrated because they have many locals.

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Agreed

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Tough-guy townie culture is a loser culture.

I even had an old guy in Somerville sneer at me, "Are you one of those yuppies?" Um, do you know what a yuppie is old man? Do you even know what you're angry at?

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"Yuppies"

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"Yuppies". What is this, 1985? Next they'll be chasing out those dirty hippies. And the beatniks. And the flappers.

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Hipsters

Its true, people who are calling Southie a new hipster haven need to visit Davis Sqaure or Brooklyn to see some real hipster concentrations.

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Hipsters are so old hat

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The problem with hipsters is that they are so old hat. It's all nostalgia for something that has already been done. The current version of punks as well. The other day I saw a punk around 20 years old coming out of a coffee shop in Allston with punkish hair, a leather jacket with all kinds of band stickers on the back (crumbling off of course), very tight black pants, spikes around the wrist, looking for all the world very impressed with himself. One sees a lot of these people. I thought "big deal, I looked like that in 1977 at the Rat". And in 1977 we would have been appalled to look like something from 35 years before. If you're going to be young and hip you better show me something NEW.

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The common mistake about hipsters is

assuming that all they care about is the age-old act of horrifying their parents and other squares with their contrarian fashion choices. I know a few, and some of them are actually artists eking out a living from their art.

Further, many have a nose for music, film, theater, and other arts that lets them spot interesting talent well ahead of the crowd. As in any subculture, there are hangers-on and wannabes, and it's true that there's a lot of fashion recycling going on. But not all hipsters fit the Complete Poseur stereotype.

What strikes me as genuinely trite is zeroing in on them as a convenient Other for various established in-groups to loathe, not unlike longtime residents hating on yuppies in Southie. The irony is that your mocking them only feeds their notion that they must be doing something right.

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I concur. And I remember

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I concur. And I remember being every bit as full of myself as hipsters at that age, but we had zines and the 9:30 Club and Factsheet 5 and loft galleries run by people who lived in them and afterhours joints instead of the current web 2.0 innernets-- and we were also insufferable about "discovering" stuff that was new (to us).

Today it's hipsters, tomorrow it's something else. But it's always post teen young adults and it will never ever change.

Now get offa my lawn.

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Well,

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At least they aren't typically douchey or offensive... Just livin their version of the dream. Hipsters are not out to impress others by being outlandish, it seems they're just being creative and being real. Albeit not my style of being real or creative, but they're civilized, respectful of others and genuine, and that's all that matters at the end of the day. Hipsters don't want any part of this trash-talkin Townie thuggery, I'm sure!

Not to mention....

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It has a bit of a different meaning when Kevin McCarthy's boot is coming down on your face as he's saying it.

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It became a derogatory term about

five seconds after it was coined. You might think, "Hmmm, young urban professional sounds like a compliment", but in fact it's now just blue-collar code for "Vain, materialistic douchebag." Never mind that the wielder might also be a vain, materialistic douchebag; class envy makes it an insult.

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Seriously?

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Where do you get the idea he was not being respectful? Sounds like he was minding his own business and someone called him a yuppie. No one goes around calling random people a yuppie unless they mean it as an insult.

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I am better than that old man

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Because I don't go up to strangers on the street and sneer at them and insult them in a nasty tone of voice. Neither did my construction worker father.

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The three housing projects

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The three housing projects will not be priced out and there are some Southie residents that won't sell out. We all need to get along.

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What is with out of state

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What is with out of state transplant's seeming disdain for every local neighborhood that happens to have some longtime residents? That is part of what gives Boston it's distinctiveness relative to place the transplant moved from. It's one thing to be upset at bad behavior, it's another thing to simply dislike people because they grew up in the area they recently transplanted themselves to. A lot of transplants probably know they grew up in less interesting parts of the country relative to well established and rooted neighborhoods they have now settled in.

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ok

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What is with some longtime residents seeming disdain for out of state transplant's?

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The above post did not

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The above post did not articulate disdain for out of state transplants. The point it raises has already been well demonstrated. A lot of new residents from other less interesting places seem to dislike people simply because they have long ties to the area.

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Any examples?

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Where is the disdain for locals that you claim exists?

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One example

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Scan this page for "the sooner this tough-guy".

The original question still

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The original question still stands, but go ahead and answer a question with a question if that's what you can muster.

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Change

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or fear of change, to be exact.

When it's a new racial or ethnic group moving in, racism is the charge, and that might be true, but fear of change is the biggest driver.

Now, someone who has been arrested repeatedly for allegedly beating up "yuppies" might be using the fear of change to cover a certain level of sociopathy.

To be fair, if these "yuppies" settle down in, well, wherever, they will eventually develop a distain for whatever the next level is.

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indeed!

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Better question given the topic we're commenting on...

Lack of Families

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The true shame of the changing neighborhoods is the lack of children who live in the city. South Boston was a great place to grow up. Some are dedicated to raising their family's in the city, but many new development isn't designed for families, and many 'transplants' only intend to live in these area for their 20 and early 30, then flee to the suburbs to raise families.

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I think you might be missing a big trend,

which is that more and more young people, including the ones that want to start families, don't want to live in the suburbs anymore. This is why so many tech companies are locating their facilities in Kendall Square, the Seaport, and other dense urban areas. Watch for McMansion-dotted suburbs to become the new derelict, poor neighborhoods over the next 20 years. Suburban flight is now happening in reverse.

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I may be, but....

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I may be missing the trend because a lot of new development in my particular area of the city is geared to single person life styles. For instance, one bedroom condos and so called 'micro-units' are not places to raise families. But you do have an interesting point regarding less settled parts of the city.

No Lack of Families in South Boston.

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I was going to say the same thing.

Just take a walk along East or West Broadway on a Saturday morning. You'll see nothing but SUV-sized strollers. Even my neighbors, who have lived here their whole lives, keep saying how there are more families here now.

Probably not as many as in the 70s or 80s...but the trend is moving up.

Roslindale not as friendly as some say

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I don't know if you were in the neighborhood in the early 1990s, but it was a period marked by flight. The first Hispanic (or maybe black) families started moving in and all of the sudden some long time families "discovered" Walpole and its environs. Sure, it wasn't Mattapan in the 1950s or Dorchester in the 1960s through 80s, but there was flight. And those I knew who moved were quite open about why they were leaving, since the neighborhood was going to hell (according to them.) What one sees in Southie or Charlestown is what happens when those remaining decide to fight.

Of course, those who didn't leave Roslindale when the complexion started to change noticed that the newcomers, though different, were not that different. I would compliment Msgr. Frank Kelley for keeping his flock thinking straight (though parishes to the southwest did gain during the period.) With acceptance of those newcomers, when the new professionals started showing up the tone was set.

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You hit the sweet spot

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The bad were out, but the property values didn't quite take off. Well done (and a good asset to the place, to boot)

Yes, we lucked out

Especially because we wound up on a one block long street where everyone knows everyone else and gets along and parties together a couple of times a year. ;-}

We did have to ultimately remove the entire outside of our house (starting with the rotting shingles) -- so we still haven't had much money to change the inside (except for floor refinishing).

People can go into new places with good attitudes or bad attitudes -- I find good attitudes usually work best. ;~}

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You apparently did not read

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You apparently did not read the whole post. The question was not about dislike of bad behavior, but rather disliking people simply because they have resided in an area for a long time.

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Evidence?

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Do you have evidence of this? Have their been documented cases of young, urban professionals roaming around southie beating up long-time residents?

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What are you even talking

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What are you even talking about? The question was why do so many transplants seem to dislike and even mock locals simply because they have lived in an area for a long time.

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I'm talking about...

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Backing up your statement with a bit of proof. You made the statement that "transplants" hate locals....and I asked for proof of this? I know that some locals dislike "yuppies" because they beat the crap out of them while screaming "you're not from Southie, yuppie"....but I've yet to see evidence that transplants "hate" and "mock" people who have lived there for a long time.

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Where was the exact statement

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Where was the exact statement made that "transplants hate locals"? That was not the exact wording. If you want to make up quotes your argument wont go very far.

Furthermore, you asked for evidence of bad behavior from transplants, when that was not the original question. The original question was essentially why do so many transplants dislike locals simply for having long ties to the area. Now that you have been corrected, you are somewhat asking a more relevant question, yet still can't resist inserting secondary points about

Read the starting post, for one example. The implication is that people should be price out of the neighborhood. If prices are raised, many long term residents would end up leaving.

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"the sooner this tough-guy

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"the sooner this tough-guy townie culture gets priced out of southie and other hoods around here, the better for everyone.
good riddance."

Look no further than UHUB!! You can find local/longtime people being mocked quite often. I admit to finding it amuzing myself, at times. This whole parade kerfuffle this past week showed to me that some people just like to mock. It was boarderline Irish bashing and people really seemed to enjoy it. I'll bet if we took some of those posts and changed the neighborhoods, names and ethnicity it would have had a very different flavor, am I right?

It's funny that the space savers are such a hot issue to many on this blog, they've been saving spaces for 50 years!! Suddenly many find it so troublesome.
What made people come to the city? If the people of Boston are so abhorant to some - why the heck did you come here and have to live amongst those you deem inferior?

It's true what someone said - everyone needs to get over themselves and learn to live with one another and accept each other. That includes newcomers to Southie as well as those that have been there for generations. Neither side is better than the other.

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the kerfuffle over space savers

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2 points for using the word "kerfuffle".
-1 for "boarderline".

To address one of your topics: the space saver.
Yes, "they" have been using space savers for years.
Now, the "newcomers" may find that quite a culture shock.
Is there a South Boston continuing ed. class that can be taken
before even trying to park a car on a public street before winter sets in?

The introduction of "Citizens Connect" to the Internet Universe
now makes the stories of the space savers well known outside the
selected neighborhood. (Also, see Twitter, Facebook, etc.)
Instead of thinking "Oh, it's just me who had an issue with this."
No, it's not just you. A LOT of people have or have had or will have space
saver issues. And it appears to be just one particular neighborhood of Boston.
"Fascinating", Mr. Spock might say. Let's take a tricorder reading.

Wrong

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"No, it's not just you. A LOT of people have or have had or will have space
saver issues. And it appears to be just one particular neighborhood of Boston."

Wrong, wrong, wrong! there are MANY neighborhoods in Boston with the space saver issue. Many, many! I live in East Boston and people use space savers as a matter of course whenever they take their car from" their" parking space, not just when it snows. especially the old-timer, long time residents. But you are correct that it is more out in the open now and is seen through different eyes by newer residents. It used to be an accepted "in" thing among the old time locals, that this was "just done". But as newer people moved in they balked (and rightfully so) at this absurd sense of entitlement. And I say this as a long time resident.

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I think you're overestimating

I think you're overestimating how "interesting" a place Southie is.

Even if Southie were as you've stated, a more interesting than other parts of the country, most "yuppys" I know just don't care.

They don't read Uhub, have no idea what bussing was, maybe have heard of Whitey Bulger.

The fact of the matter is, most of the "locals" are themselves transplants from a different era, and alot of the "yuppys" are just people like them from surrounding areas.

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It's not just Southie, and

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It's not just Southie, and obviously there's other places to learn about the history then Uhub. It's the entire Boston region, and even the Northeast. Compare many of the towns and neighborhoods to this region to other parts of the country which have much more transient populations and newer neighborhoods.

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OK

I'll give you that; New England could be considered more interesting than say... Kansas.

But it doesn't matter, most of these "yuppys" aren't from out of state. They're from the South Shore, New Hampshire, or in rarer cases New Jersey.

Southie just isn't that special. It's close to downtown and is less expensive. The end.

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What is with out of state

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What is with out of state transplant's disdain for every local neighborhood with long time residents. It's one thing to dislike bad behavior, it's another thing to dislike people just because they grew up in the area. These neighborhoods are what gives the Boston area a lot of it's character. A lot of out of state transplants are from places that are far less interesting.

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Chokettie seems to dislike

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Chokettie seems to dislike any long time residents of neighborhoods, since he is going beyond simply criticizing bad behavior. He want's to see people priced out, which is fairly arrogant sounding. One has to wonder why people move to such area's place if they feel that way to begin with.

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Tough Guy Townie Culture

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He was talking very specifically about Tough Guy Townie Culture and seeing these people priced out. You know this. I agree that it may have been a rash statement but I would give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he doesn't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. I don't think he dislikes people just because they grew up in a certain neighborhood.

Any other examples of transplants disliking the locals?

Snob...

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There are bad apples, of course. But good, hard working families have watched themselves get "priced out" by elitist snobs like you. For shame.

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We go through this every so often, but just in case ...

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The purpose of bail is not to punish somebody who has yet to go to trial, but to ensure they show up for the trial. They're two different things. Whether the bail amounts in this case are enough to ensure they show up is a valid question, but I don't think that's what people are saying here.

In this case, while it seems like these people are guilty, we really need to wait for the jury (or judge if the defendants go that route) to hear both sides of the story.

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Also

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I'd argue that bail is a way to keep dangerous criminals off the street pending trial. Given the fact that he's still serving a suspended sentence for pretty much the same crime (assault), I'd say there's a decent chance he could do the same thing while out on his $500 bail. I don't think anyone has said the other accused shouldn't be out pending trial.

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Wait, what?

We're supposed to wait for the jury to hear the case before anonymously slagging people on the internet, even dirtbags? Since when?

Is this part of that web 2.0 thing?

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Correct. However, bail amounts should also refect

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the severity of the crime the person is accused of as well. That is not an undue punishment, or presuming guilt before trial. Rather, it's a rationale and fair criteia. It's also common sense.

And any judge that sets a bail amount that's lower than the prosecution's recommendations should provide their justification for the decision to reduce bail in writing, and said written justification should be placed in the public record for everyone to see.

There is, Sir, the small matter of...

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of public safety! Not to mention grounds to revoke his probation *at least McCarthy...maybe others are on probation, too...?) And what do you say about the liberal release with no drug or alcohol restrictions/reporting to probation. No ankle bracelet, no curfew? Don't try to downplay the corruption with, "bail is to ensure the defendants shows up for court..." Blah, that's malarkey!

Really?

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True, the bail was laughably low and should have been ten times as much, but at least he's not letting armed thugs walk out on personal recognizance and shoot someone a few days later like everyone's favorite judge Raymond Dougan. Say what you want, but a drunken brawl involving nothing but fists should be treated less harshly than shooting or stabbing.

How could any rational person

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How could any rational person not feel as if Kevin needs to do hard time. Ur kidding right?

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i am from NC and live and

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i am from NC and live and work and boston and I am not afraid of any of these "tough and rough BAH-STIN locals". I dont dress one way or the other as to be profiled and mind my business and have never had issues. I do feel that some areas would make me more vulnerable to verbal and possibly physical assault, such as south boston. this tough guy attitude in local townies just seems outdated and laughable to me. feel free to lash at my comment.

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It sounds like you are not

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It sounds like you are not trying to change the local environment that you moved, which is good. However, there is still nothing wrong locals residing in the area they grew up in and wanting to preserve certain aspects of it.

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Who has ever claimed there is

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Who has ever claimed there is anything wrong with locals staying in the area they grew up in and wanting to preserve certain aspects of it?

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There is no need to make fun

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There is no need to make fun of the local accent. That is party of what makes some transplants look arrogant. It would be awfully boring if everyone spoke alike.

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interesting...

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I've never known a local to cry over someone making fun of our accent... If you're cryin about someone mocking the accent then you're probably not from here...or you're extremely insecure and that's another issue entirely! Be proud, but don't be foolish and take it personally. It's a funny little accent that deserves all the attention it gets! :)0

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People find it amusing that

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People find it amusing that someone from NC that came up is making fun Boston accents.

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I might, if the subject were

I might, if the subject were good ol' boys beating up newcomers and screaming "You ain't from around here, Yankee!", but to be honest, I haven't seen (or heard of) anything like that since I've been down here.

That was exactly my point

You'd think a Southerner living among Yankees might be more keenly aware of the unfairness of prejudging someone's intelligence based on their regional accent.

I didn't get the impression

I didn't get the impression that he was pre-judging them based on their accents, so much as judging them based on their self-evident steak-headedness. Simply quoting something in a faux-Boston accent is not the same as "making fun" of that accent unless you're super-sensitive.

I notice that Mr. NC hasn't

offered any demurrals to my notion that he holds that prejudice. Any sensitivity I have to this is in reverse; I usually speak with the locale-indeterminate General American accent (a/k/a "the newscaster accent"), and occasionally have noticed some prejudice toward it in places where a regional accent is prevalent. I can do a fair impression of certain New England-local accents when it suits me.

Correction

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we pronounce it 'Bawsten' (rhymes with paw), not 'Bah'.

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Unbelievable!

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How is it that McCarthy's probation hasn't already been revoked? WTF!? And who is this lame-ass judge? $500 bail for a convicted criminal committing THE SAME assault on strangers because he's a friggin bully with anger issues? Corruption is alive and well in Southie! Nothing to see here...move it along! It's ridiculous that this garbage is still tolerated in 2014...assault on a person is a crime, punishable by imprisonment, put them ALL in prison until they go to trial, so to protect the public! WTF!

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It does have the appearance

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of nepotism based 'whoyaknow' corruption.

It's one of the stranger facets of Masshole culture, brawl tolerance.

I lived in Seattle for a decade and you'll do an easy 6 months, first offense, for assault and battery.

Here, it's some hick, 'boys will be boys' bullshit only Jerry Remy's 'boy' murdered his girlfriend after sliding on priors.

I think my goon ball relatives showed up here in the 1670s. The answer is in a graveyard in Wellflet.

But there really is nothing special about being from here that involves humans.

The ecosystems are great and the rest is some long ass imposition, quaint at first, then toxic and messy and now anxious, expensive and pretentious.

Interesting

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Southie - fuck the townies, price them out, bike lanes, whole foods, gaypatrick parade!!!
JP (Jamaica Spain)/dot/rox - don't let the evil whities price out the poor/whosefoods/keep it ghetto/gentrification is eeeeevil!!11oneone!!!!

What gives?

Two words

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White guilt