Looks like somebody had an extra apostrophe and just couldn't bear to part with it

So there's this new Italian restaurant at 45 Province St. and it's called:

MAST'

And no matter how many times they claim the name and the apostrophe is derived from some Italian slang word (which will remind you of a particular Seinfeld episode), it's just never not going to look weird 'n stuff. And how do you even make a possessive out of that? "Fortunately, Mast''s menu has English captions ..."

H/t Steve Garfield.

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First in a chain

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MAST' = phallic

URB' = urban

'BATE = strap on those beer goggles before last call

Sounds like..

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The gasps and utterances you might make while choking on their food.

A lot of competition in the Bad Restaurant Name sweepstakes,

but this one has the early lead for Worst Restaurant Name of 2014. (Other contenders: Crave -- Mad for Chicken, Legal Oysteria, MC Spiedo, InBoston. I guess it's not really close.)

Yes, o'mast is Neapolitan for "master craftsman". So you drop the O, move the apostrophe to the end, and leave it hanging in space? That's not too blindingly dumb.

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MC Spiedo

The first time I saw that I was like WTF??

The first image that came to mind was Nick Verano, in a speedo, with finger pointed sideways like a gun, saying "Yo, use wanna table?"

I still shudder.

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Ridiculous and further, in error.

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This is a clipped word, not a contraction; therefore, the use of an apostrophe is in error. Alternative examples of such usage would be to write bra' or 'phone for brassiere or telephone, respectively. One might conceivably use such an expression in writing to emphasize that one is using a clipped word, though it not correct and would largely emphasize instead that the writer is, well, an idiot.

The rare usages of words that appear to be contractions with an external apostophe ["'twas" for "it was", "'fraid so" for "afraid so", or "'nother" for "another"] are either archaic or colloquialisms that as such do not appear in formal writing without being set off within quotations. Contractions are by definition internal deletions within two or more words with the apostrophe present to mark the deletion (consider "o'clock", "of the clock")