The parking lot where the Beaneaters used to play

The Huntington News takes a look back at Columbus Avenue, when it was home to the South End Grounds, where the Boston Beaneaters baseball team played, rather than a parking lot slated to be turned into the Northeastern science center.

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Dude , you have me confused..

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Dude , you have me confused...

South End Grounds refers to any one of three baseball parks on one site in Boston, Massachusetts. They were home to the Boston club in the National Association and the National League from 1871 to 1914.

At least in its third edition, the formal name of the park, as indicated by the sign over its entrance gate, was Boston National League Base Ball Park. It was located on the northeast corner of Columbus Avenue and Walpole Street (now Saint Cyprian's Place), just southwest of the current Carter Playground. Accordingly, it was also known over the years as Walpole Street Grounds; two other names were Union Baseball Grounds and simply Boston Baseball Grounds. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_End_Grounds )

The 1903 World Series was the first modern World Series to be played in Major League Baseball. It matched the Boston Americans[1] of the American League against the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League in a best-of-nine series, with Boston prevailing five games to three, winning the last four.An overflow crowd at the Huntington Avenue Grounds in Boston : http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5d/WorldSeries1903...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1903_World_Series

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clearing up the confusion

South End Grounds - south (east) side of the tracks, home to NL team Boston Beaneaters (later Braves)

Huntington Ave Grounds - north (west) side of the tracks, home to AL team Boston Americans (now Red Sox)

Somewhere I've seen a photo of both parks having a game at the same time.

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Thankyou

Without doing more research at my desk, I read the NU article and it felt like he was wrapping both fields and both teams into a single historical account of baseball.