Wonder how much these would go for today - even with the hole in the wall?

Row houses

The folks at the Boston City Archive wonder if you can figure out when and where this photo was taken. See it larger.

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    Back Bay

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    I'd say one of our rats could just about squeeze into that hole, probably with that 25 lb lobster in his mouth.

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    Haynes St?

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    Looks like a barely-changed Haynes St in East Boston. The hole surely has been covered with vinyl siding by now.

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    Immigrant Home

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    And that would be the chimney of the immigrant home behind it (erected in 1912 according to the building).

    100% Haynes Street

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    I looked into buying the third house from the left a few years back. Some have barely changed in the past century, right down to the door overhangs. The house I was looking into even has the same windows in this pic. Hell, even the manhole cover in the street is in the same place. When it was for sale in 09 in dire need of a rehab it was $130k, after a full renovation they flipped it for $320k. http://www.redfin.com/MA/Boston/19-Haynes-St-02128/home/9111976 for anyone who wants to be a creeper. It's a shame they don't have the pre-renovation pics up, the place was a throwback to 1919.

    The hole in the foundation isn't visible today, but that house on the end has been changed more than the rest and the foundation is covered in new concrete.

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    Note the papers in all the doorways

    I would guess that this is somewhere in the 1915-1920 time frame, and that these buildings are being torn down for a school building.

    So it could be the address, above - or some other place where an earlier, smaller wave of "urban renewal" took place.

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    Preserve in City Archives the plain text full Stenograph Record

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    Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Jeannette Bastian, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Christopher Cook, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Maureen Feeney, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    William Fowler, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Patricia McMahon, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Eugene L. O’Flaherty, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    James O'Toole, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Amy Ryan, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston
    Meredith Weenick, Archives and Records Advisory Commission, City of Boston

    Please preserve in City Archives the plain text full Stenographic Record of Public Meetings of Boston City Council.

    FOUR

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    ...minutes to Wapner.

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    It sure looks Charlestown-like to me....

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    ....but it could be just about anywhere. Maybe early 1900's? Re: hole in the wall -- real estate ad would read "private entrance to garden level apartment."

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    HOLY SMOLEY

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    the kids hanging out on the stoop
    some broken windows give it that east boston ambiance
    but the kicker is is the girl flipping of the wholy smoly thats grandma!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Public Works

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    sucked at cleaning streets back then too.

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    Archives and Records Commission, City of Boston

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    CITY OF BOSTON
    Archives & Records Management Advisory Commission

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 , 3:40 p.m.
    Archives & Records Center, 201 Rivermoor St.

    Members Present:
    1) Maureen Feeney (City Clerk),
    2) Jeanette Bastian (Public),
    3) Bill Sinnott (Law),
    4) Elaine O'Connor (Admin. Services),
    5) James O'Toole (Public),
    6) Mary Frances O’Brien (Boston Public Library),
    7) Bill Fowler (Public),
    8) Christopher Cook (Arts & Tourism),
    9) Patty McMahon (Registry)

    Others Present:
    10) Alex Geourntas (Asst. City Clerk),
    11) Deputy Archivist John McColgan,
    12) Asst. Archivist Dave Nathan,
    13) Asst. Archivist Kristen Swett,
    14) Asst. Archivist Marta Crilly,
    15) Project Archivist Gretchen Carney,
    16) Patrick Collins (Dept. of Innovation & Technology [DoIT]),
    17) Jim Cyphers (Neighborhood Development),
    18) Dean Huggins (Boston Redevelopment Authority),
    19) Ruth Edele (Boston Redevelopment Authority),
    20) Mary Bender (Boston Public Library)

    Call to order.

    Maureen Feeney: Welcomed Commission members and guests. She acknowledged the progress made by Archives staff on its NHPRC Archives Acquisition Project and in helping agencies in meeting their public records compliance responsibilities, and her appreciation for the agency cooperation given so far. She also noted that Asst. Archivist Dave Nathan was retiring at the end of the year and wanted to acknowledge his invaluable service to the program. Also, that the Clerk should be hearing shortly regarding her request to reclassify the Archives staff positions.

    Acceptance of Previous Minutes: The minutes previously distributed for June 25, 2012 were reviewed and accepted.

    Deputy Archivist Quarterly Report: Maureen directed attention to the agenda and that the main topic of discussion is discussion of transfer of the Registry Division’s early vital records to the City Archives. She then introduced Deputy Archivist John McColgan to report on current activities of the program.

     Proposal to Transfer Early Registry Division Vital Records to the Archives.
    o John McColgan noted that Archives concerns about early vital records goes back to the 1996-99 collaboration with Registry to inventory and re-house its early records. Unfortunately, the follow-up recommendations to physically conserve fragile items, produce public use copies, and transfer the originals to the Archives did not occur. He

    1

    stated his belief that Archives proposals to preserve and make available these records— like the earlier effort—are best done through a collaborative relationship with the Registry. He then asked Commission members for their advice on how to proceed.

     Patty McMahon: She currently needs these records because they are used for public requests on a daily basis. With DoIT’s help she is beginning new technological initiatives to meet demands on these and more recent records, to the end of relying less on paper originals. She agrees that preservation and access are important. Post-1987 records will shortly be entirely computer-generated. A project is being devised to scan onsite legacy records from 1921 forward. BPL staff has also been consulted regarding technological options. She is open to other City agencies supporting her technology planning.

    o Jim Cyphers: Would the Family Search service (formerly the Genealogical Society of Utah) be a technology option?

     McMahon: She needs to err on the safe side as to what outside parties would have access to; many birth and marriage records are privacy-restricted for up to 90 years. Also complicating a conversion effort is the need to integrate name error corrections and deposition changes into the digitization and system workflow. She therefore thinks that an effort run by an outside entity could not meet her agency’s requirements.

    o Feeney: asked if boxes in Patti’s office were also legacy records
     McMahon: these are microfilm from past conversion efforts being reviewed

    o Bill Fowler: Does partnering with Family Search mean that there would be fees just to view the documents?

     Mary Frances O’Brien: Family Search is free; Digital Commonwealth for which the BPL is the regional lead agency is another low cost option

     McColgan: Family Search in its proposal to Archives for scanning tax records would also provide free access.

    o McColgan: Many early vital records require physical conservation and Archives is prepared as part of a proposed transfer to plan for that. Yet, to date Archives has been excluded from any involvement, which is contrary to our statutory need to be involved.

    o Dave Nathan: As the lead person for the 1996-99 effort, I need to emphasize that physical conservation of fragile early vitals is essential before any use can be made of them even for copying. Important also to acknowledge that both Archives and Registry want what’s best for preserving and making publicly accessible these records.

     McMahon: She agrees on the need for physical conservation.

    o Feeney: It is evident that many vitals are in dire physical condition. They need assessment now on what measures to take and what resources needed.

     McMahon: She first needs to know where to begin first and she will work to address this with as many partners as necessary.

    o Bill Sinnott: Department heads need some leeway on carrying out their responsibilities. Patty wants and needs help, and should be given credit for that.

     Feeney: Unfortunately the Archives should have been involved in planning and discussion before this.

     Bill Fowler: Suggest that parties present should get together and test a pilot program to address these concerns.

    2

     McColgan: Can we really regard the earliest vitals as active records?

    o McMahon: She is willing to work with Archives staff on joint projects that will also build relationships. The need right now is help with the conservation element.

     Feeney: If this is an offer then the Clerk and Archives would like to get back to her regarding budget and grant planning.

    o Christopher Cook: Struck that with both the Registry and Archives willing to cooperate he can’t imagine that they can’t come up with a plan of collaboration.

     Feeney: Asks McMahon if a meeting can be set up perhaps as early as the following week to discuss where to go from here.

     Archives & Records Policy: Need for Senior Management Buy-in.

    o McColgan referred to a previously distributed set of Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles, developed by the Association of Records Managers & Administrators (ARMA,) which includes managerial accountability for actively managing its recordkeeping. In the City the key compliance with this is appointing and supporting a Department Records Officer (DRO) in managing agency records. We are currently dealing with this at the BPS whose managers have yet to comply with the directive to appoint DROs

     Jim O’Toole: If establishing and training DROs was the critical first step, what is the follow-up to keep the program on track?

     Cook: Suggests a yearly check-in to keep lists current and to keep apprised of currently agency conditions

     Feeney: Is there a way, perhaps at the Cabinet level to say we need to move ahead on DRO compliance? Resources are needed here for training and more active direction by agency administrator. Yes, Archives for its part can arrange the DRO follow-up meetings

     O’Brien: How about developing a file plan template for HR-related records in the departments, perhaps based on a department employing best practices? It would be something DROs could immediately use to improve their file plan practice.

     City Archives Digitization Program
    o A digitization program of selected documents and images underway for both reference and outreach purposes and we have identified our short-term hardware and software needs. In addition, we are reviewing a proposal from Family Search to collaborate on digitizing tax records from 1822 to 1918.

     O’Brien: Would the resource requested be a capital budget line item?
     Feeney: Yes

     Fowler: would like to see example of a typical tax record content
     Kristen Swett: we can provide you with a copy

     Fowler & Jeanette Bastian: concerned with the accuracy to be expected from the crowd sourcing technique used by Family Search to index the images.

     O’Brien: Suggests checking with current customers of the service

     McMahon: Suggests establishing an accuracy benchmark

     Feeney: Archives will report back to the Commission on these concerns

    3

     Outreach to Departments and the Public
    o McColgan recounted that a number of online exhibits of document and images have been mounted in the previous few months, the latest, street scenes from the 1940s, also being on display at City Hall. The Archives has also contributed material to a collaborative online exhibit on the Coconut Grove Fire. In addition, several presentations are scheduled in the months ahead for community and professional groups regarding Archives collections.

    o Marta Crilly: reported that the use of social media applications including Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, and Twitter has generated much public interest, with re-postings on other media outlets, such as Universal Hub.

    Adjournment: Feeney moved that, if there were no other observations, that the meeting be adjourned; it was seconded and passed. The next meeting is to be determined. Meeting adjourned at 5:20 pm.

    4

    CITY OF BOSTON

    By on

    CITY OF BOSTON
    Archives & Records Management Advisory Commission
    Thursday, October 18, 2012 , 3:40 p.m.
    Archives & Records Center, 201 Rivermoor St.
    Members Present: Maureen Feeney (City Clerk), Jeanette Bastian (Public), Bill Sinnott (Law), Elaine
    O'Connor (Admin. Services), James O'Toole (Public), Mary Frances O’Brien (Boston Public Library),
    Bill Fowler (Public), Christopher Cook (Arts & Tourism), Patty McMahon (Registry)
    Others Present: Alex Geourntas (Asst. City Clerk), Deputy Archivist John McColgan, Asst. Archivist
    Dave Nathan, Asst. Archivist Kristen Swett, Asst. Archivist Marta Crilly, Project Archivist Gretchen
    Carney, Patrick Collins (Dept. of Innovation & Technology [DoIT]), Jim Cyphers (Neighborhood
    Development), Dean Huggins & Ruth Edele (Boston Redevelopment Authority), Mary Bender (Boston
    Public Library)
    Call to order.
    Maureen Feeney: Welcomed Commission members and guests. She acknowledged the progress made
    by Archives staff on its NHPRC Archives Acquisition Project and in helping agencies in meeting their
    public records compliance responsibilities, and her appreciation for the agency cooperation given so far.
    She also noted that Asst. Archivist Dave Nathan was retiring at the end of the year and wanted to
    acknowledge his invaluable service to the program. Also, that the Clerk should be hearing shortly
    regarding her request to reclassify the Archives staff positions.
    Acceptance of Previous Minutes: The minutes previously distributed for June 25, 2012 were reviewed
    and accepted.
    Deputy Archivist Quarterly Report: Maureen directed attention to the agenda and that the main topic
    of discussion is discussion of transfer of the Registry Division’s early vital records to the City Archives.
    She then introduced Deputy Archivist John McColgan to report on current activities of the program.
     Proposal to Transfer Early Registry Division Vital Records to the Archives.
    o John McColgan noted that Archives concerns about early vital records goes back to the
    1996-99 collaboration with Registry to inventory and re-house its early records.
    Unfortunately, the follow-up recommendations to physically conserve fragile items,
    produce public use copies, and transfer the originals to the Archives did not occur. He
    1
    stated his belief that Archives proposals to preserve and make available these records—
    like the earlier effort—are best done through a collaborative relationship with the
    Registry. He then asked Commission members for their advice on how to proceed.
     Patty McMahon: She currently needs these records because they are used for
    public requests on a daily basis. With DoIT’s help she is beginning new
    technological initiatives to meet demands on these and more recent records, to the
    end of relying less on paper originals. She agrees that preservation and access are
    important. Post-1987 records will shortly be entirely computer-generated. A
    project is being devised to scan onsite legacy records from 1921 forward. BPL
    staff has also been consulted regarding technological options. She is open to other
    City agencies supporting her technology planning.
    o Jim Cyphers: Would the Family Search service (formerly the Genealogical Society of
    Utah) be a technology option?
     McMahon: She needs to err on the safe side as to what outside parties would have
    access to; many birth and marriage records are privacy-restricted for up to 90
    years. Also complicating a conversion effort is the need to integrate name error
    corrections and deposition changes into the digitization and system workflow. She
    therefore thinks that an effort run by an outside entity could not meet her agency’s
    requirements.
    o Feeney: asked if boxes in Patti’s office were also legacy records
     McMahon: these are microfilm from past conversion efforts being reviewed
    o Bill Fowler: Does partnering with Family Search mean that there would be fees just to
    view the documents?
     Mary Frances O’Brien: Family Search is free; Digital Commonwealth for which
     McColgan: Family Search in its proposal to Archives for scanning tax records
    o McColgan: Many early vital records require physical conservation and Archives is
    prepared as part of a proposed transfer to plan for that. Yet, to date Archives has been
    excluded from any involvement, which is contrary to our statutory need to be involved.
    o Dave Nathan: As the lead person for the 1996-99 effort, I need to emphasize that physical
    conservation of fragile early vitals is essential before any use can be made of them even
    for copying. Important also to acknowledge that both Archives and Registry want what’s
    best for preserving and making publicly accessible these records.
     McMahon: She agrees on the need for physical conservation.
    o Feeney: It is evident that many vitals are in dire physical condition. They need assessment
    now on what measures to take and what resources needed.
     McMahon: She first needs to know where to begin first and she will work to
    o Bill Sinnott: Department heads need some leeway on carrying out their responsibilities.
    Patty wants and needs help, and should be given credit for that.
     Feeney: Unfortunately the Archives should have been involved in planning and
     Bill Fowler: Suggest that parties present should get together and test a pilot
    the BPL is the regional lead agency is another low cost option
    would also provide free access.
    address this with as many partners as necessary.
    discussion before this.
    program to address these concerns.
    2
     McColgan: Can we really regard the earliest vitals as active records?
    o McMahon: She is willing to work with Archives staff on joint projects that will also build
    relationships. The need right now is help with the conservation element.
     Feeney: If this is an offer then the Clerk and Archives would like to get back to
    o Christopher Cook: Struck that with both the Registry and Archives willing to cooperate
    he can’t imagine that they can’t come up with a plan of collaboration.
     Feeney: Asks McMahon if a meeting can be set up perhaps as early as the
    her regarding budget and grant planning.
    following week to discuss where to go from here.
     Archives & Records Policy: Need for Senior Management Buy-in.
    o McColgan referred to a previously distributed set of Generally Accepted Recordkeeping
    Principles, developed by the Association of Records Managers & Administrators
    (ARMA,) which includes managerial accountability for actively managing its
    recordkeeping. In the City the key compliance with this is appointing and supporting a
    Department Records Officer (DRO) in managing agency records. We are currently
    dealing with this at the BPS whose managers have yet to comply with the directive to
    appoint DROs
     Jim O’Toole: If establishing and training DROs was the critical first step, what is
     Cook: Suggests a yearly check-in to keep lists current and to keep apprised of
     Feeney: Is there a way, perhaps at the Cabinet level to say we need to move ahead
     O’Brien: How about developing a file plan template for HR-related records in the
    the follow-up to keep the program on track?
    currently agency conditions
    on DRO compliance? Resources are needed here for training and more active
    direction by agency administrator. Yes, Archives for its part can arrange the DRO
    follow-up meetings
    departments, perhaps based on a department employing best practices? It would
    be something DROs could immediately use to improve their file plan practice.
     City Archives Digitization Program
    o A digitization program of selected documents and images underway for both reference
    and outreach purposes and we have identified our short-term hardware and software
    needs. In addition, we are reviewing a proposal from Family Search to collaborate on
    digitizing tax records from 1822 to 1918.
     O’Brien: Would the resource requested be a capital budget line item?
     Fowler: would like to see example of a typical tax record content
     Fowler & Jeanette Bastian: concerned with the accuracy to be expected from the
     Feeney: Yes
     Kristen Swett: we can provide you with a copy
    crowd sourcing technique used by Family Search to index the images.
     O’Brien: Suggests checking with current customers of the service
     McMahon: Suggests establishing an accuracy benchmark
     Feeney: Archives will report back to the Commission on these concerns
    3
     Outreach to Departments and the Public
    o McColgan recounted that a number of online exhibits of document and images have been
    mounted in the previous few months, the latest, street scenes from the 1940s, also being
    on display at City Hall. The Archives has also contributed material to a collaborative
    online exhibit on the Coconut Grove Fire. In addition, several presentations are scheduled
    in the months ahead for community and professional groups regarding Archives
    collections.
    o Marta Crilly: reported that the use of social media applications including Facebook,
    Tumblr, Flickr, and Twitter has generated much public interest, with re-postings on other
    media outlets, such as Universal Hub.
    Adjournment: Feeney moved that, if there were no other observations, that the meeting be adjourned; it
    was seconded and passed. The next meeting is to be determined. Meeting adjourned at 5:20 pm.
    4

    I know, right?

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    Thanks for playing, folks!

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    Thanks for playing, folks! This is 15-23 Haynes Street in East Boston on July 21, 1920.

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