Man who spent time in prison for defrauding Home Depot charged with defrauding Home Depot again

A Salem man sentenced to five years in federal prison for a scheme in which he'd go around Home Depot stores collecting stuff in a shopping cart then "returning" them at the returns desk was charged today with pulling the same stunt several times earlier this year.

The US Attorney's office in Boston reports Robert Dooley, 56, took advantage of Home Depot's policy of allowing returns without a receipt on several trips to Home Depot stores in January and February of this year:

On each occasion, Dooley, entered Home Depot stores empty handed and gathered merchandise totaling $500 to $900. At the returns desk, Dooley falsely claimed that he previously purchased the items, but did not have a receipt. When he provided this driver’s license number to the clerk, Dooley often varied the number so the “return” would not immediately be detected as fraudulent. Dooley was then issued a Home Depot card for the fraudulent return. According to the complaint, Dooley perpetrated the scam over forty times at Home Depots stores in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Maine, racking up over $35,000 in fraudulent returns.

Dooley was convicted in 2007 of doing the same thing in 2004 and 2005. A key difference: At the time, he worked for the IRS and would show his IRS ID, which he typically wore around his neck, at the returns desk to help prove he was legit.

If convicted again, he could face up to 20 years in prison.

Innocent, etc.

Neighborhoods: 

Topics: 

Free tagging: 

Comments

AND WHO PAYS FOR FRAUD

By on

Great job Law Enforcement, more the average person like myself ends up paying for fraudulent crimes, i.e. prices.

up
Voting is closed. 0

Not higher prices

By on

but greater tax write offs for what is termed "lossage". All businesses do this to some degree, but most of them actually have sensible return policies (and needing to show a receipt to return something should be taught in Retail 101).

And I personally have yet to encounter a retailer that requires you to show an ID to return an item.

But as long as people can get crappy quality stuff for a few cents cheaper than going to the local hardware store, it's somehow considered a good thing for society. And unless this guy was instructed never to enter a Home Depot again as part of his prior conviction, it's unlikely that will be brought into evidence at his new trial under the "prior bad acts" exclusion.

up
Voting is closed. 0

I'm no lawyer, but...

I have heard that the rules which normally prevent the prosecution from bringing up past crimes in court (for good reason) may have exceptions when the past crimes involve dishonesty, such as fraud.

I think that the commentary about Rule 609(a)(2) on this page is relevant: https://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/fre/rule_609

up
Voting is closed. 0

He should get..

By on

An extra 5 years for being a dumb ass .

up
Voting is closed. 0

Impressive

Didn't Channel close in the early 90s?

up
Voting is closed. 0

Nice going, Ace...

By on

You added True Value to this thread.

up
Voting is closed. 0

HD doesn't require showing the Driver's License?

By on

When he provided this driver’s license number to the clerk, Dooley often varied the number so the “return” would not immediately be detected as fraudulent.

Sounds like he just told them his number - or any number.

Unless he borrowed other people's Driver's license?? I can't imagine giving my license to someone to borrow.

up
Voting is closed. 0

He would give a fake license number

By on

The guy would show the license while it's still in his wallet and then pretend to read the number, but it would be a fake number.

up
Voting is closed. 0

How to do it

I wonder why you can't buy the stuff first, and then come back in with the receipt, collect identical new stuff and get cash for that?

up
Voting is closed. 0

That only works with

By on

That only works with contractors who can actually use those items (this was a big issue when I worked at HD). Otherwise you would at best break even.

up
Voting is closed. 0

I'm intrigued by the

By on

I'm intrigued by the mentality of a person who can spend five years in prison for fraud and IMMEDIATELY start doing the same crimes again thinking either you're better at it now and no one will wise up to your antics -or- everyone around you is just that stupid and you've got this ALLLLLL figured out.

"If convicted...." pretty sure is "When convicted"

up
Voting is closed. 0