Arrest warrant issued for man charged with letting dog roast to death in JP

Travis Gustafson failed to appear in court for his arraignment today on a charge of animal cruelty for the heat-related death of a pit bull in his pickup truck on Burroughs Street in Jamaica Plain on Aug. 1, the Suffolk County District Attorney's office reports.

As a result, a West Roxbury Municipal Court judge issued a warrant for Gustafson's arrest, the DA's office says.

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    Consequences

    As he doesn't seem to have learned much to date about them, maybe getting into some more will eventually remove the compost from his cranium.

    What a cruel thing to do.

    By on

    What was this guy thinking leaving his dog in an unventilated, non-air conditioned vehicle on a blazing hot day, not even providing water? This is not something you accidentally do, unless you were under serious mental distress, on mind altering substances, lack of sleep, etc.

    smh.

    People also do this because

    By on

    People also do this because they are just on autopilot. It's happened several times where parents have left their child to die in a hot car. It's a horrifying way for any person or animal to die, and it's not excusable by any means--more just an observation that this can occur from simple lack of focus rather than willful negligence.

    How many arrest warrants are outstanding?

    By on

    This case and the reports of defendants defaulting after the "peaceful" rally on the Common (and other cases reported here) raise the question of how many arrest warrants are currently outstanding in the Commonwealth? It's really a joke / revolving door since nobody is coming looking for these people. Unless they have contact with an officer (traffic stop or threshold inquiry and the officer decides to go to his computer) they can simply walk away forever. Interestingly, this particular defendant will get more scrutiny for animal abuse than if he were wanted for child abuse.

    IIRC, the Globe did a story on the warrant crisis 15-20 years ago and there were something like 50,000 open or outstanding arrest warrants. That story should be updated. It would be slightly more interesting than criticism of the First Lady's choice of footwear.

    Speaking of non sequiturs, fishy fishy FISHY!

    By on

    reports of defendants defaulting after the "peaceful" rally on the Common
    criticism of the First Lady's choice of footwear

    You're such a complete numbnuts.

    how many arrest warrants are currently outstanding in the Commonwealth?

    I'm astonished you need to ask, being a REAL COP and not even slightly fraudulent.

    Nothing wrong with his

    By on

    Nothing wrong with his questions.

    Man, let go of your hate.

    Warrant system is a mess

    By on

    I'm long retired but I don't think even current officers can tally the number of outstanding warrants statewide. An educated guess, the number of warrants is shocking. It would take a FOIA request and a system administrator to get the info, but it's easier to criticize Melania's shoes. Nobody goes looking for the fugitives unless they've committed murder or perhaps animal cruelty.

    Your disparaging comments aside, it always struck me that good police work leading to a felony arrest would result in an assistant clerk magistrate, usually a politician or political appointee, coming to the police station or barracks and bailing the suspect on personal recognizance for $40 and many times the suspect would never be seen again. Frequently, the suspect would claim to have voted and campaigned for the clerk magistrate, usually a former state representative or senator. Folksy banter but chilling if you were on the call. $40 gets you out the back door. Some stations and barracks even installed ATM machines to make it easier to get the $40 if the suspect held an ATM card at time of arrest.

    Often the fugitives would "wait it out," possibly getting stopped for speeding 10 years after being bailed on a serious crime that they failed to show up in court for. The defense attorneys, often politicians voting on judges pay, would argue that "it has been ten years, let it go" and win! Officers retire, witnesses move or die off. The system is a disaster and deserves Boston media coverage.