Local developer picked to rebuild and dramatically expand South Boston housing project

The BHA has selected WinnDevelopment to completely replace the 1,000-unit Mary Ellen McCormack project and add roughly 2,000 more units to the 27-acre site that will include market-rate rentals and condominiums.

The company - no relation to the casino company - will "rebuild the site into a vibrant mixed-income community with a thoughtful design that embraces the existing residents and connects with the surrounding neighborhood," the mayor's office said in a statement.

Mary Ellen McCormack is the city's oldest public-housing project, built in the 1930s. It currently consists of 27 three- and four-story walk-up buildings.

Current residents will be offered units in other BHA developments or Section 8 vouchers during the reconstruction of the public-housing part of the project - and will be offered first dibs on the new units there.

To pay for the redevelopment of the public-housing units, Winn will build 2,000 additional units ranging from "workforce" units aimed at people making roughly the area median income to market-rate apartments and condos. The city says that all 3,000 units will be "of identical quality and integrated evenly among the newly constructed buildings."

Winn's proposal also includes "a town square, large-scale community center, branch library and neighborhood supermarket."

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??

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I've heard this development is a National Historic Landmark & can't be entirely torn down..

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It's not a National Historic Landmark

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or even listed on the National Register of Historic Place.

Neither of which would offer any protection. Only City of Boston Landmark status protects a building.

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History repeats itself

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When they did this to Columbia Point and Old Colony projects the BHA kicked all the residents out and promised they would be returned to a beautiful new development. And we all know what happened next. Just another ploy for the City to decimated low and middle class families.

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Some people take advantage of the move

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Not everyone in these buildings wanted to stay anyway. This was their chance to get out.

Everyone was offered housing.

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Do some research

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Old Colony was built with 873 low-income units. Right now, per their website, "Homes at Old Colony" (nice gentrified name) they offer a total 245. (The third phase of the project, which was to add 364-464 units has yet to receive funding, per Wikipedia.)

Do the math.

The fact of the matter. The number of public units are decreased, one way or another, in many of these projects. So instead of being low-income and affordable for many we now have low-income and affordable for a lucky few with a good portion affordable to those who make very good money.

It is not a question of the offering, but of the affordability.

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Most of the affordable

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Most of the affordable housing in the city is supported through section 8 vouchers, so ~1,000 low income families do not get crushed into one undermanaged building and become a permanent blight on a neighborhood.

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What happened next

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Please explain. Preferably with links to stories about what happened next.

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Connectivity

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Good! It's about time they modernize that section, and I'm glad they've established a socially equitable process to prioritize the homes for current residents at McCormack.

I wonder if Winn Development and the City can include some sort of plan to connect Kemp Street to Old Colony Ave in the east and Boston Street/South Bay Center in the west. It would do wonders for relieving congestion along several roadways, including a shorter walk from McCormack to a redeveloping South Bay Center.

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Well then they'll make a

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Well then they'll make a great team with BHA!!! Two peas in a pod.

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Mary Ellen McCormack Project

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Not found on the List of National Historic Landmarks in Massachusetts. Even though someone said it was so designated, it's best to check the facts. I hope the BHA takes a good, long look at their rental policies. I think those paying market rate will not want to put up with nonsense that's been going on there.

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The gentrificaton of public housing continues

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What this really means, long term:

Current residents, who have to move will be offered units (if available, of course) in other BHA developments or Section 8 vouchers; there are waiting lists for those; are the powers that be going to hand out vouchers in light of that fact? And if an unit or voucher is not available, what are these folk's to do?

The ultimate question I have for the Mayor's office is "What will be the new rents for the new public housing portion of this project?" Will they be capped at 30 percent of a person's income?

The mayor's office should be ashamed. There is no concern for the people, only profit.

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Yes.

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Add this to the growing list of things Mahty should be ashamed of.

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What would be so nice

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is if the local newspapers, such as the Globe, did less coverage on Trump's newest tweet and/or she sheds and more coverage on stuff like this. How about a spot light series, Boston Globe, with a follow up on how well these folks fare?

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Did you even read anything?

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Nobody is being "kicked out" of the system. If you are in public housing, your choices are sometimes limited.

No units are being lost - in fact, they are sometimes expanded by these schemes.

Kids growing up in mixed developments do far better at getting out of poverty than kids who grow up in poverty warehouses.

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245 is less than the 875

245 is less than the 875 units there now. where are the new public housing units going to be?

Nobody is accepting Section 8 any more not that rents are so high. giving out section 8 certificates is not equitable.

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As long as the number of

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As long as the number of subsidised units doesn't change I personally cant complain. This greatly improves the housing conditions for the current residents. Also great density by 2 train stations and much needed supply!

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Location