MIT Media Lab to offer $250,000 award for disobedience

The MIT Media Lab is accepting applications through May 1 for a no-strings-attached $250,000 Disobedience Award:

This award will go to a person or group engaged in what we believe is an extraordinary example of disobedience for the benefit of society.

What does this mean? Societies and institutions lean toward order and away from chaos. While necessary for functioning, structure can also stifle creativity, flexibility, and productive change–and ultimately, society's health and sustainability. This is true from academia, to corporations, governments, the sciences, and our local communities.

With this award, we honor work that impacts society in positive ways, and is consistent with a set of key principles. These principles include non-violence, creativity, courage, and taking responsibility for one’s actions. This disobedience is not limited to specific disciplines; examples include scientific research, civil rights, freedom of speech, human rights, and the freedom to innovate.

Also, before you start the submission process, you'll read this:

This nomination form is a secure form and the information submitted will not be shared publicly. Information submitted will be reviewed by the award selection committee only. If one of your nominees is selected as the award recipient, we will contact the winner for permission before announcing any personal information. We are mindful of privacy and the fact that many people and organizations doing disobedient work might not want to disclose their information to the public.

H/t Wakefield.

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I nominate me

Without my edgy (and oft disdained) thoughts and actions, we all might still be reading Trumpland entries every day. I refuse to obey the mainstream narrative of the lockstep leftists. I am, in effect, disobedient.

Guys who use their anti-Trump safety pins to make scratches on their face for their false police reports now think twice before wasting public resources.

http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2017/03/ann_arbor_woman_pl...

News sites are more careful to think twice before posting suspicious stories now. Hell, look at how fast they dropped the wiretap story when they saw Trump was correct.

Yay truth and justice. Yay me. Yay 250 large!

Yawn

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You clearly don't get it. Being contrarian isn't enough. You are taking no risks, not bettering society.

Trolls need not apply.

High risk

-- You are taking no risks --

Nearly every single time I post, someone either tells me that I "clearly don't get it" or that I am stupid. Often I am called a troll. That hurts. That hurts out loud. One of my leghumpers called me stupid three times in one post.

I suffer for my cause.

Fail

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So you are in step with the current regime and feel that by spreading and perpetuating propaganda you are some how helping? Yikes....

8 years prior.....

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98%-99% of commenters here were in step with the prior regime and felt that by spreading and perpetuating propaganda, they were somehow helping.

Yikes indeed.

Aaron Swartz

Swartz's work also focused on civic awareness and activism. He helped launch the Progressive Change Campaign Committee in 2009 to learn more about effective online activism. In 2010, he became a research fellow at Harvard University's Safra Research Lab on Institutional Corruption, directed by Lawrence Lessig. He founded the online group Demand Progress, known for its campaign against the Stop Online Piracy Act.

Natch!

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I just assumed he posted this to troll for votes! :)

We would rather recieve

We would rather recieve financial support directly in lieu of Adam simply continuing to provide our glorious struggle of liberation a forum and the occasional artisinal kosher bagel. Though we acknowledge the dedicated legion of server gnomes, not to be conflated with the treasonous garden gnomes, in Adam's employ need their stipends.

But what if..

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We are mindful of privacy and the fact that many people and organizations doing disobedient work might not want to disclose their information to the public.

So I assume any organization inclined to disobediently hack into and leak details of the entries for the benefit of society need not apply?

I get so confused about when information wants to be free and when it doesn't.

You Need To Read That Complete Quote In Context

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We take privacy seriously.

This nomination form is a secure form and the information submitted will not be shared publicly. Information submitted will be reviewed by the award selection committee only. If one of your nominees is selected as the award recipient, we will contact the winner for permission before announcing any personal information. We are mindful of privacy and the fact that many people and organizations doing disobedient work might not want to disclose their information to the public.

It's a statement that they'll keep your submission private, and if the person you nominate happens to be the lucky winner, they won't disclose their real name without the winner's approval.

While I suppose you could do something worthy of nomination yourself, the award is generally about nominating someone else for recognition.

Easy

Information wants to be free when it concerns one group attempting to control or illegally influence another group, such as NSA spying tools, illegal corporate actions, etc.

Information want to be private when it concerns only one individual or a small group and is personal in nature, such as personal emails, etc.

Donald Trump

He's broken conventions, is chaotic, and rejects common thinking and established practices. He's changing society rapidly. He rejects the dogma of the US constitution and ignores history.

Of course, he's making making things worse for a large majority of the population (if not the world). But if you ignore the evil part, he's a shoe-in for the prize.

Disobedience Award Announcement is only in English, yes?

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Am I understanding the situation correctly about only the English language being used to make this announcement of an award, the application forms are only in English, and all other matters related to the award are only in English?

If I am correct in the question -- in three parts -- above is correct, am I also correct in feeling that something is very wrong?

I asked over at the ISOC and it seems that nobody is concerned.

Now I am starting to look around on the Net map to see if this idea that English rules is a common idea with folks outside the ISOC.

Thank you for your attention.