A good latke can be hard to find in Boston

Jewish Boston goes on a latke hunt in time for Channukah. Not as easy as it might seem:

One would think that the Chestnut Hill Wegmans would stock latkes. They have subs, salads, sushi, and a person whose job it is to offer samples of cannoli. However: You will brave the crowds, and you will be sorely disappointed.

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Comments

Not for the faint of heart

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Making latkes requires either strong hands and knuckles that can survive close encounters with a grater, or else owning a food processor. I admire those who are willing and able to tackle this. I admit fresh cooked are the best, but lack of cooking skills isn't the only reason some of us resort to store-bought.

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C’mon.

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Grating a potato isn’t exactly a serious kitchen skill, or dangerous. And the payoff of making your own vs buying a cold, soggy latke from a grocery store or even one that’s been sitting under a heat lamp is crazy good. Teenagers love this kind of cooking challenge—turn it over to the nieces and nephews and grandkids but make them at home. So worth it.

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some of us

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Have arthritis and don't have any youngsters nearby.

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Yeah, but

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Admitted that homemade latkes are indeed crazy good, but they're still not a minor chore. Also, there's really no such thing as latkes for one or two (although they do freeze really well). So if it's just you and you're thinking, "Mmmm, latkes!" it does make sense to find someone else who's making them rather than rolling your own.

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Definitely a problem

knuckles that can survive close encounters with a grater,

At which point the latkes become no longer vegetarian. Voice of experience here.

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Better Homes and Gardens

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The latest issue of Better Homes and Gardens suggested using a spiralizer for making latkes. However, given how my mother had to almost go to the hospital after cutting herself with one, it's probably not much better of an alternative.

When my mom would make them,

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When my mom would make them, it would take a lot of counter space, a fry-a-lator, and a giant can of crisco. Not everyone has the space, time, tools, or money to spend on an item like the fryer to justify a once a year use. Times like this it would be good to create a co-op of weird kitchen utensils for people to borrow.

Also, not everyone enjoys cooking!

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Skillet

When my mom makes them she uses a skillet, as do I.

You do have a skillet, don’t you?

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Oy.

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I’m a goy with a TINY counter, some vegetable oil, and a skillet and trust me, I can turn out a great latke. Do whatever you want, but don’t tell me that a grocery store latke is going to be worthy of the name.

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Here we go with the "learn

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Here we go with the "learn how to cook crowd." I'm sorry I live by myself . Sometimes I just want A latke. Sometimes I just want a few hard boiled eggs. Sometimes I just want a single serving of food and don't want to turn my house upside down to do it. Oh and no I do not plan on making my own greek yogurt.

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cafe polonia, euromart

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cafe polonia, euromart near andrew sq have potato pancakes year round

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Euromart

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Euromart gets the potato pancakes in on Fridays.

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The best latkes can be found

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The best latkes can be found right in your own kitchen! Go to FeedMeBubbe.com and search latkes. You will not be dissappointed and it is the real deal! God Bless Bubbe!!

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Michael's Deli in Brookline

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Has fresh latkes for $2.50 each; or if you order by Friday from their special Chanukah catering menu, $28.00 a dozen.

I've eaten the ones from Whole Foods (River Street, Cambridge) and they are good.

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Use a mix

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My mother used a mix & the latkes were quite good. A compromise, easier on the knuckles, & doable for one or two people.

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A space-saving, cheap alternative to a food processor for latke

making is a $23 Japanese mandoline (use one of the included julienne blades to shred to your desired thickness) and a $7 cut glove to protect your digits from those very sharp blades.

These are common tools in professional kitchens, and great time-savers for many tedious prep chores.

Another worthwhile investment for making latkes or hash browns is a potato ricer, which I use to squeeze out excess moisture from my shredded potatoes, yielding much crisper results. It is also genius in its original application, turning boiled potatoes into beautifully-textured mashed potatoes.

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Town Diner in Watertown has

Town Diner in Watertown has about the best ones I have around here in a restaurant. The best I have had at a restaurant was at a Perkins in Batavia New York which is probably the closest one of their places to Boston. The best I have had are my own and that's not bragging. It's one of those things that simply does'nt work unless cooked and eaten fresh which is the reason the correspondent's search came up cold. I typically dislike seeing people respond to a question by giving an answer to a completely different question that nobody asked but in this case I can't help but agree with those who say make your own. It's easy and cheap so how could I not share my recipe which follows: Peel, quarter, and core some apples allowing 1 or 2 apples per person. Put them in a covered pot with an eighth of an inch of water in it. Cook them on the lowest possible heat until they soften slightly then take them off heat. Use a potato masher to crush the apples. Don't mash them completely but leave them in tiny pieces. Add a pinch each of cinnamon and cardamom powder and enough sugar to sweeten to taste. Return to heat and stir until sugar dissolves then take off heat and leave covered. Wash some potatoes allowing 1 large or 2 or 3 small ones per person. Grate the potatoes into a bowl. Add a little flour and enough egg to moisten. Add salt and black pepper to taste. Heat some oil in a pan to sizzling hot. Put in some of the potato mixture and flatten slightly. Cook until the edges brown then turn over and cook the other side an equal length of time. Remove from pan and drain on paper, keeping warm in the oven if necessary until ready to serve. No need to thank me. Lchaim and merry Christmas.