Allston to MassDOT: Give us Transit Not Traffic

Galen Mook with three years of meeting minutes - "make this not just a highway project"

Support for better bus and rail transit dominated last night's meeting hosted by MassDOT on the Mass Pike Allston reconstruction project.

State Representative Michael Moran (Allston/Brighton) recalled the excitement of the 2014 West Station ribbon cutting, recalling the history of Allston and Brighton being overlooked by the commuter rail system. "There are winners and losers" in MassDOT's I-90 project, he noted. "Certainly Harvard, they get all the land underneath this that they get to develop" will be a winner, referencing the 91 acres under the existing highway interchange that Harvard purchased in 2003 from the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority for $75 million. But without West Station in the first phase of construction, "I don't see much in this for us", Moran said. "It's now time for us to let MassDOT know how disappointed we are".

Moran was followed by dozens of people who spoke in support of West Station and improved bus service. The vision they expressed has much in common with the City of Boston's Imagine Boston 2030 plan and the State's 2014 plan for West Station. By building a new North Allston-Comm Ave bus route over the rebuilt Mass Pike and connecting it to West Station, regional transit would be greatly strengthened. Buses could run from Porter Sq and Harvard Sq through North Allston on dedicated bus lanes, stop at West Station, and continue down Comm Ave to Longwood.

Allston resident Galen Mook concluded the meeting with observations about the many ways this project needs to improve. Considering the trip on Cambridge Street from Pizzeria Regina to the Charles River by walking or biking, Mook said "You are going to cross a four lane intersection, another four lane intersection, another four lane intersection, then a five lane intersection, then a three lane intersection, then a five lane intersection, and then another five lane intersection. This is not the off-road multi-use pathway we've been talking about for three years."

Mook also questioned MassDOT estimate that only 250 people a day would use West Station. "If you modeled West Station connecting Harvard Sq to Longwood, West Station to Kendall Sq, maybe 250 people would use the first train each day." Without new bus and rail transit, Allston may not be able to handle the new development that could come to Allston if true transit oriented development is possible, he warned.

Comments on this project can be sent to:
Matthew Beaton, Secretary of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Attn: MEPA Office
Alex Strysky, EEA # 15278
100 Cambridge St Suite 900
Boston MA 02114
[email protected]

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Comments

ANYTHING they can do to strengthen non-auto transit

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in that area would be a boon to non-drivers and drivers alike. The area is already an automotive catastrophe, and adding in hundreds of new shops, thousands of new offices, and (perhaps) tens of thousands of new residents is only going to kick the traffic problems over the line from almost impossible to fully impossible. Considering the importance of the nearby stretch of Storrow Drive to the connectivity of the rest of Boston and Cambridge, it's scary to think what would happen if they underestimate the impact. Take transit seriously and do it right, and people won't need or want to drive there.

Basically we get to start almost from scratch, like the Seaport. Let's see if we can do it right this time. An integrated plan could turn it into a model for cities going forward.

(Also: What that new neighborhood REALLY screams out for is a shuttle tunnel under the river to Harvard Station. Half the length required is already there, using the old route to the Elliot Yards. Yeah, I know it will never happen, but a guy can dream, right?)

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Ironically the best way to do that is by trimming the $5B GLX

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Pollack & Ramirez choose the GLX over West Station. With realistic costs overruns, the GLX will rise above $5 billion by 2020. However, if Allston and its leadership can convince the state to trim the GLX then there's funding for West. The dirty little secret with the GLX is that the trolley project explodes in costs when it enters an already busy rail trench with Amtrak Downeaster service to Maine, Wildcat service to Haverhill & Lawrence, and all service to Woburn & Lowell. Trim the GLX right before it hits the Amtrak:Haverhill:Lowell rail trench: you'll have $4 billion leftover: $1 billion in allocated funding fed or state and $3 billion in overruns. Oh and btw, federal matches can be switched out and changed. Yet another dirty little secret MassDOT is hiding

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What are you talking about?

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None of this makes any sense. Yes, the Downeaster runs on the Lowell Line Commuter Rail line, where it switches to the Wildcat Line in Wilmington about 15 miles north of the planned terminus of the Green Line. I fail to see what any of that has to do with the GLX, or where you pulled this "$5 billion" figure from.

Here's my theory

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Maybe, just maybe, the anon thinks they should cut back the extension so it only goes as far as the Star Market on the McGrath/O'Brien Highway.

Or, somehow they actually think that the engineers haven't factored in that there are active rail tracks next to the GLX ROW. I'm going with the Star Market idea, though.

GLX cut at the Inner Belt

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Definitely realistic. The one spaghetti spur to Union Square that literally looks like interstate highway spaghetti. $800,000. It gets worse north of the Inner Belt

It makes sense

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The GLX trolleys cannot run on the same tracks as Commuter Rail or Amtrak: federal policy. Given these restrictions, the T needs to widen the trench and build a new set of tracks solely for trolleys. This leads to a major spike in costs, compared to the abandoned corridor in the Inner Belt where the GLX is slated to run. The certain self-propelled vehicles that have been pitched by past admins, diesel multiple unit vehicles, or DMU vehicles, CAN run on the same tracks as Commuter Rail or Amtrak. And DMU vehicles can become electrified in the future, so you're not deciding between between permanent diesel or electrification. However, it does mean the GLX project, a CLF initiative by Stephanie Pollack, is toast. Do you think Pollack will adapt or scream about DMUs?

Please focus on moving people instead of cars.

I urge the planners of this project to seriously rethink the plans to exclude West Station from the initial I-90 project and listen to community members instead of worrying about the fastest way to move non-residents cars through our neighborhood. I fear that starting this neighborhood without a robust connection to public transit will turn this area into another Seaport.

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Please focus on replacing freeway bridges

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that are slowly deteriorating and will eventually collapse if not addressed. Please focus on eliminating tight roadway curvature that is no longer necessary (as both the rail yard and toll booths are now gone).

And please allow MassDOT to make these NECESSARY improvements without delaying the work by interjecting your "cars are evil" inspired wish list.

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Please focus on TRANSPORTATION

This is ridiculous - the point is to move PEOPLE. The need is to focus on moving PEOPLE and not just cars.

Some of us plan to still be around in 30 years, and want to have an environment with reduced impacts from CARS - impacts of air pollution, impacts of noise, impacts of heat islands, impacts of carbon emissions, impacts on cardiovascular health, impacts on sedentary-related illnesses. Just because you have a fetish for 1950s development doesn't mean that the rest of us should have to live with that into the future.

Mass DOT, by 2008 law, will have to do a Health Impact Assessment on this project. They won't be able to meet the requirements without transit improvements to the corridor.

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Did a car driver cut you off recently, Swirls.

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Hokey. A data stat nerd, like yourself, should be aware that our pollution issues are not just with CARS, as you point out. Let us do a hypothetical, shall we? As cars are not going away any time soon (you seem to still have a problem understanding this simple fact), even if we could all afford electric vehicles (can you? I can't), the other big factor is emissions from our power plants (perhaps you can start a resistant movement?) and then you still have the issue with our trucks (which transport bikes to the zealots, BTW) as well as airplanes (do you take them regularly? You might want to cut back), and, well, other stuff.

So if you could step down from your bike zealotry pulpit for just a small point of time and offer up some realistic suggestions other than teetering on your soap box, we might actually get somewhere.

But perhaps I ask too much?

Thank you.

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Real Priorities and Process vs. Bizarro Projection

Perhaps you should step down from your car zealotry reactivity disorder and read what I read, honey? I'm afraid that I'm a bit too lumpy and hate wearing white and make a really bad screen for all that you just tried to project.

Maybe you would learn something about reality and priorities.

The stakeholders at this meeting made more than a few important suggestions. I think you should read those. They are realistic and will likely make an appearance in the legally-required HIA, just as they have with Grounding McGrath.'

Seems that projection AND whataboutism are on your dance card today. I will indulge your ignorance only this far: check out the Exec Office of Energy and Environment's energy dashboards if you want to see how fossil-powered transportation has become our commonwealth's greatest emissions issue these days. Maybe even download the USEPAs nifty emissions and pollutants calculator called COBRA while you still can, and play with the mix yourself. Nahhh ... that takes critical thinking skills.

BONUS POINTS: Find the words Bicycle, Bicycle Lane, and Cycling in my post.

(massive hint: YOU CAN'T)

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Higher level of thought, sweetie

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Knowing your previous posts as well as your thoughts on cars from the many years of you ranting about the evils of such (you are clever, though, you like to swing from the back), I can safely assume that when you rant, it is based on strong fact.

So, lol!, um, I do not need to see those words that you cited in order to know which way you bat, honey buns. So when I see you yell "CAR' and "CARS' or "DRIVERS" or, well, you fill in the word, in your posts, and then proceed to describe a half baked solution (?) without "CARS' included, well...

What I find interesting is you are basically confirming what I posted, that you can't have a reasonable and productive conversation because of your anti car bais. Which is really unfortunate, snookums.

In regards to the meeting, well, I have been a few meetings in my day and they are made up by many well meaning folks. Unfortunately, some, like yourself, are not dealing in reality.

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Who pissed in your cornflakes, sweetie?

You are really getting defensive and irrational.

Plenty of resources to fix stupid are being offered to you, but I'm not sure that will fix irrational.

And, hey, turn off that projector already - I'm wearing red and the colors look funny.

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LOL!

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You just can't stop! Keep it coming.

(I am really enjoying our exchange. Laughing here in my cube on lunch break).

But on a more sober note, I am disagreeing with you and reacting to your insults which is a very human thing to do.

So while you spew that I am "defensive" and "irrational" I counter that those are two of your best traits!

And as you now insult me as "stupid" well, that all I can say is I am so very glad I am not you. Also, calling someone "stupid" so is not cool.

In regards to getting help, BTW, you might want to check out a good counselor to deal with your anger issues. I am serious.

Have a nice day!

Oh, I don't eat Corn Flakes.

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Speaking of data!

For the first time in 40 years, power plants are no longer the biggest source of US greenhouse gas pollution. That dubious distinction now belongs to the transport sector: cars, trucks, planes, trains and boats.

http://www.afr.com/business/transport/automobile/cars-pass-power-plants-...

But back to the topic at hand, is it really so outlandish for us to ask for transportation projects that don't just focus on cars? Especially when it comes with a $1 billion price tag? Its the Big Dig all over again, lots of money for car projects, cutting of alternative transit projects.

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Ok, Spin, my last post on this topic..

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The reason why some projects focus on cars is that the majority of people in this state as well as the country rely on them. This is a fact. I will let you and others do the research.

Your reasoning regarding the Big Dig (which was a flawed project) and where the money comes from and is going is not that simple as saying "lost of money for car projects, cutting of alternative transit projects."

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I will not, lol!

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And I know you work with the issues, as you say. However, it is amazing that you can't have a productive conversation on this topic without going medieval on someone's ass. Or resorting to insults.

But that is the Swirls we know and love.

I like to think I am making some good points and you just can't acknowledge them. Thank you!

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You're being willfully ignorant on this

You are right, its not about where the money comes from and is going is not that simple as saying "lost of money for car projects, cutting of alternative transit projects."

Its about what projects were funded and actually built vs those that weren't. The Big Dig was required to build a number of projects to mitigate those specific car-centric elements but several have been delayed or never followed through on. That is a fact and you know it.

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I would say

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The point of the Big Dig was to re-knit back the financial district to the waterfront for residents and tourists alike. And they did succeed in that endeavor. Further, the noise level was reduced by a lot. Yes, there is still a lot of traffic at the surface level, but it is visibly and experientially miles above what it was in the late 80's (or is that miles below? (yes I know, it's not that deep)).

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That Was Just A Selling Point— The Main Point Was Fixing Traffic

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Yes, the Big Dig helped the surrounding neighborhoods somewhat, primarily by removing the eyesore of the elevated Central Artery, but that certainly wasn't the main reason for doing it. The Big Dig was a transportation project.

Boston's traffic was already terrible. It was projected if nothing was done, it would continue to get worse and lead to clogged highways much of the day. There's no question that extending I-90 through the Frozen Head Tunnel improved motor vehicle access to the airport, but the O'Neill Tunnel is just as traffic clogged as the old elevated artery was, and north-south commutes on I-93 and the Southeast Expressway are just as bad or worse than ever.

The biggest tragedy is the earlier promises of improvements to transit were scaled back or eliminated. In addition to significant improvements to the Ⓣ (Red-Blue connection, extensions to Blue and Green Lines, etc.), there was to be a North-South Station rail connector, and some sort of rapid-transit service to the airport.

Like its namesake was, the O'Neill Tunnel is wider than it needs to be. As a result, traffic creeps along miserably during rush hour because the roads leading out of it can't handle the load. One less lane in each direction would have been just as effective, and left billions available for transit. Even more tragic, the tunnels were constructed so shoddily, there have been constant maintenance issues. This will only get worse as the project ages, taking more funds from other transportation infrastructure.

The Big Dig tunnels are hideously ugly and have been filthy since the day they opened (who thought unglazed tile was a good idea?) Who else has fond memories of enjoying the sights of Boston on a pleasant day, while stuck in traffic on the elevated Central Artery?

Chicken and egg. The reason

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Chicken and egg. The reason people rely on cars is that our infrastructure (or lack of transit) made them. Why not try to do something about that?

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Check out I-93 at Rush Hour

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No people are moving.

That's the problem - cars can move ... but they don't when there are too many of them.

I bet you could move a person by jumping off a cliff! Doesn't mean that it is the most rational way to move a person, though. Cars are not the most effective way to move people.

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If you plan to be in 30 years

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If you plan to be in 30 years, you might want to put away that bicycle. All it takes is one low speed accident on a bicycle to leave you a cripple. What's the carbon impact of that?

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Been biking since 1972

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Been biking in Boston since 1981.

No long term injuries from biking or accidents while biking.

I have many friends who have done the same. Most of our parents were dead by our age due to smoking and driving.

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Just a friendly reminder that

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Just a friendly reminder that approx 40,000 people die in motor vehicle crashes in the US EVERY YEAR and we've been hovering around that mark since at least the 1960s.

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To compare apples to apples,

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To compare apples to apples, how do you think the casuality rate compares between cars and bicycles per mile?

I for one still have scars from biking and jogging a long time ago, but not a scratch from probably a million miles of driving.

Go to PubMed

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Search "cycling health impact"

Read the studies. Risks of road injury and air pollution are far lower than risks of sedentary lifestyle. Even in Brazil.

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Yes, and motor vehicle

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Yes, and motor vehicle accidents do the same crippling. And leave a toxic legacy as well. Why shuttle a ton or two of armor all over for a SOV?
Join up with others and HOVer about, or get some tiny motor trike or something.

Fewer and shorter and combined trips makes sense to.
REDUCE.
Speed. Weight, Wolume. Distance.

What reduces demand?
High costs. Raise the price of fuel to cover subsidized and hidden costs and you can still have them to zip around. You'll just get more of the reaming than is currently given to all, including non-drivers.

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And what about

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the poor folks in this country that are living paycheck to paycheck and can't afford a rise in fuel?

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Well ... YMMV

I ushered in my 50th birthday with a 50km ride around an island in Italy.

My father celebrated his 50th with a nice meal polished off with a syringe of insulin. My brother was close to 400lbs at his 40th ... but then he smartened up and shed the bulk and the insulin and blood pressure meds.

Put simply: If I don't bike, I won't make it to 80. Meanwhile, I've been biking in the Boston area for close to thirty five years, save when I lived near I-495, commuted by car, and followed the family path toward sensational obesity secondary to sedentary lifestyle. I have had two accidents, nether requiring hospitalization, both were self-inflicted and partly due to road conditions.

There is plenty of literature on the subject to say that I'm not alone. I'm very well steeped in this research literature, and the weight of evidence indicates that the benefits of regular exercise from active transportation far outweigh the risks of collisions and pollution. The increased physical activity that comes with mass transit is also highly beneficial - people who use transit walk a great deal more than people who drive

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kevinmurnane/2017/04/25/new-research-indica...

So drivers should get $1

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So drivers should get $1 billion for this tiny stretch of highway and responsible public transit users should get nothing? Typical greedy driver.

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Not the best project to say that

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The highway in question is a toll road. The bonds issued to pay for this will be paid off by the very drivers that will be using the road, through the tolls that will be literally collected at the project area.

Now, if you can create a project in which West Station (a project I support) will be paid off solely by fares in the next 10 years, your criticism of this would be valid. And, of course, for a myriad of other highway projects. Just not this one.

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No thanks

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Cars are evil. I don't even believe that but if you're going to be such an insufferable prick then, fine, cars are evil.

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Well, are they or not?

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Cars are a necessity. Unfortunately, many folks want them to just disappear which is just plain silly and not conducive to productive conversation and problem solving.

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This conversation isn't about that.

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It's about Allston being promised West Station (and a ribbon cutting three years ago) and now having that promise broken.

Also, there are many who live without cars. So we see that although it makes life much easier for many, you can make the case it's not a necessity. I know those are fighting words to many, but let's all be reminded that driving is not a right, it's a privilege (i.e. licensed).

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*wave*

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On January 20th.. it will be 19 years car free for me.

No, not a biker. Just someone who thinks cars are waste of money. I seem to manage just fine.. I rent a car when I need it. But since I started lyfting more.. I rarely rent a car now.

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Really?

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Again, I was responding to Kip's post. Moving along.

Yes, many do live without cars. I, for many years, did not have a car or would borrow a car. I now need a car.

So it is not a necessity. However, if it makes "life much easier for many", than those people might think of it as a necessity, no?

In regards to driving is not a right, it is a privilege: You have a right to drive when you get your license.

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Again....

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Not sure what you're responding to. All of that amounted to a bunch of distinctions without a difference. Just because people colloquially use the word "necessity" doesn't mean it's accurate. Actually that's kind of the definition of colloquialism...

We're not talking about cars. We're talking about proper development of Allston, including West Station, as priority over the expansion of I90 or whatever highway projects are being proposed as the solution.

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Wait, huh?

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You do realize that I-90 is already there and that in a bandwidth level they are in fact technically contracting it, right?

Everything else is about the redevelopment of the old Beacon Yards. That's the big story with this project. The turnpike portion of what is going on is in fact a very small part of this, except that the road will be straighter and narrower where the toll plaza use to be.

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Yes

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And if they want to improve capacity of the corridor, it won't be coming from spending all the money on car travel amenities.

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Yep

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Think my memory was addled. Mainly wanted to highlight the West Station portion and misspoke. Thanks for correcting that for me.

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Car Culture is evil

Designing our cities and mobility around them have created a culture of dependency. We can build and design our communities around multi-mode transit options and still keep cars, we just need to stop prioritizing everything a single mode of transit.

Unfortunately, many folks feel entitled to drive and park where ever they want, which is just plain silly and not conducive to building vibrant communities.

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Well, yes,

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but the majority of people who say drive to work, drive by auto. And right now it is a priority as our the roads and highways are getting choked with traffic. And we need solutions to that problem.

Interesting that you and others are spewing this entitlement crap which does nothing to solve the problem. People who have to drive have the need to drive for a wide variety of reasons. I do not think they believe they are entitled. And as I car driver, I just can't park wherever I want. Using broad characterizations is not helpful. Or as you say, silly.

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Few things

Using broad characterizations is not helpful

Agreed.

Interesting that you and others are spewing this entitlement crap which does nothing to solve the problem.

Pot meet kettle.

And right now it is a priority as our the roads and highways are getting choked with traffic.

You ARE traffic.

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LOL!

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Well, this really has been an interesting, um, discussion, with you all.

Yes, I am traffic but definitely not feeling entitled although you and others think that way. Good luck with that line of tact. Unfortunately, you are not helping in the solution.

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I'm NOT traffic, since I don

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I'm NOT traffic, since I don't have a car.

But I still prefer transportation systems that reduce traffic jams, especially in neighborhoods.

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Yeahbut

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That's exactly what the call for West Station is about! If you build more and better transit, the cars will actually disappear, either left in their suburban driveways or not purchased at all (a 1-car household is within reach!).

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The ONLY way you are going to

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The ONLY way you are going to get cars OFF the road is by having a better transit infrastructure system. We need options for everyone in this city, not just the drivers. Yes we need to fix bridges and roads; I agree 100% but the transit infrastructure has been ignored to the point where we get excited that we get a new stop/station once every 30 years (Assembly Row for Orange line)? It's pathetic. Silver line was a billion dollar bus with no dedicated lane.

Cars have been the priority in this city/country for far too long. We need to have a better vision. We need to look forward. There are plenty of tax payers that take the T, walk, bike, etc...they deserve to have reliable, safe service as well. And more of it.

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Do it right or don't do it at all.

The highest priority should be improving the neighborhood around this project for the benefit of both current residents and businesses, and those who will move into it in the future.

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It is so frustrating that

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It is so frustrating that Boston is planned around the desires of subarbanites who don't feel like taking public transit. They should be the last group considered. Drivers should be ashamed with how much land and money they hog. Plan cities for people who actually live in them!

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You know what is frustrating?

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Folks like you making broad assumptions.

I am a suburbanite who takes both commuter rail and the MBTA. Daily. Hopefully you are aware that they both have major issues. Perhaps you might of seen a report this past year of ridership being down on the MBTA for many reasons. Just in case you are not aware, here you go:

https://commonwealthmagazine.org/transportation/mbta-ridership-downward-...

So, what does that mean? It means that many folks will choose drive into the city, by one way of an example. It is not a choice for many due to the many issues with public transportation.

So before you insult broad swaths of the population, please check yourself, hokey?

Thank you.

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What does this have to do with anything?

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All of what you said doesn't negate the fact that Allstonians want options they were promised such as West Station and don't want I90 to take higher priority over the area than them, much in the same way the residents of Somerville and Cambridge didn't want the proposed I695 to take priority over them and their neighborhoods.

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Boo_ums

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I was directly responding to the previous post and the broad assumption made by Kip. So it does have something to do with that.

In regards to West Station and what the Allstonians want, well, the powers that be see I90 as a bigger priority.

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And...

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Those who live there are challenging that power. Not sure what's so hard to understand about that.

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Irrelevant "rebuttal"

Seems like Whyaduck is carefully stepping around her desperate need to have her own VIP lane by nonsensically attacking people today.

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Riiight...

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Keep thinking that, Swirls.

Why don't you smoke a joint, it might make you a nicer person.

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In vs Out of the City

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Keep in mind that many people who live in the city (hi!) work outside of the city. And while public transportation is available to the current place of business, it wasn't to the previous one. And it's not on the best time schedule for the place of business. And turns a 30 minute drive into 90 minutes.

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In the case of this project, moving cars is kind of baked in

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The entire project is being made possible by moving the Pike. By definition, automobile flow is an unavoidably huge component. The "focus" as such cannot be turned away from autos. What can happen is that balance can be significantly shifted.

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If we want this area to

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If we want this area to develop as a new transit-oriented neighborhood, we need transit FIRST! West Station is a no-brainer and should be built now.

Furthermore, MassDOT needs to shrink the size of the streets in their plan. Most of them are nearly as wide as Cambridge St today. The whole point of a street network is to distribute traffic. Therefore, the streets themselves should be able to be smaller as well.

MassDOT is well on it's way to repeating the same mistakes we made in the Seaport: Poor transit service and streets that are not human scaled. Have we learned nothing?!

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Allston Stalinists

Exception proves the rule. Divided plots lead to individual character. Leads to nimbyism which our present day Stalinists want to stamp out.

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Spot the fatal flaw?

Between your ears?

I don't think the words "Stalinists" and all those other lovely scripted polysyllabic things you saw at Bratfart and love to throw about because you think they sound good mean what you think they mean.

Remember folks: spewing vocabulary doesn't make you look smart if you have no fucking idea what any of it means.

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When you have to go back over

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When you have to go back over a century to find a project which worked and there have been decades of failed projects, including the urban renewal debacle, it doesn't look good.

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Not sure

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But, seemed to work out pretty well in the Back Bay all things considered. This, also, is not the government creating a neighborhood - it is only moving and condensing infrastructure freeing up land that is owned by a private party that will then probably develop it.

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If people think it's pleasant

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If people think it's pleasant to live in the city's western neighborhoods and have access to the joys of the Worcester commuter rail, accessed by a station not near any retail district and not served by useful local transit, they're welcome to move to Boston Landing.

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Wow dude

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Move if you don't like it - is living in Allston part of your parole? If you actually live there, you will note that there is tremendous construction upgrading this Western neighborhood specifically because of Boston Landing, they're just not done yet. Not a coincidence - if you build it (transport hub), they (retail, restaurants, condos, apartments) will come as the trend is towards less dependence on cars. This, and safer streets, were promised to the people of Allston with the West Station (which would be adjacent to existing retail, restaurants, condos, apts, etc btw). It would also allow students & staff to/from BU & Harvard without having to drive (both have very limited parking) and the area residents (hi!) to get downtown quicker as the green line is slow & congested during the school year. Try driving down Cambridge Street at the pike on/off ramps - there currently is not a safe crossing for bikes & pedestrians on either side of Cambridge. People have to take their chances crossing with cars on/off ramping at highway speeds - people have actually died. The current "improvement" project has added painted crossings with no lights to signal cars to slow down/stop - better than nothing but still dangerous. The pike repositioning was sold to the neighbors (hi again) with the promise of a transit hub to help get into/out of the area without driving and safer streets - they were promised to get the project approved and now they're reneging. We're allowed to be mad about it.

You are aware, of course...

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that there's a fair amount of retail already next to Boston Landing, and more on the way? Heck, it's practically unrecognizable from three years ago.

Allow me to summarize

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Blah, Blah, Blah.

Cars are evil.

No they are not.

You're an idiot.

No YOU are.

Did you read what I typed?

No. Did you read what I said?

No. Why should I? You're an idiot......

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Or:

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Or:

We need to think about more than just cars. Our population is growing and we have terrible traffic congestion already. We need to create better non-car options along with repairing our existing car infrastructure for a whole variety of reasons.

Why are you bike nazis always trying to force me not to drive?! I love driving, and most people drive, and transit ridership more recently is down, therefore funding transit is a waste.

If you want to drive, that's fine, but not everyone does.

I will never give up my car!

I'm not asking you to.

Why are you forcing me to ride the crappy T?

I'm not. I just want to give people options.

OK whatever car hater.

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This.

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Why are you bike nazis always trying to force me not to drive?! I love driving, and most people drive, and transit ridership more recently is down, therefore funding transit is a waste.
If you want to drive, that's fine, but not everyone does.
I will never give up my car!
I'm not asking you to.
Why are you forcing me to ride the crappy T?
I'm not. I just want to give people options.
OK whatever car hater.

Boom.

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Very well said, Gary.

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It is really too bad that some can't seem to engage in a productive, non-insulting conversation. Alas, I try to go high when others go low but I am not perfect.

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I'm definitely on the side of

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I'm definitely on the side of West Station having to be in from the beginning (though they really need to sort out DMUs and signals and the prospect of getting anything approaching half-rapid service on CR lines like Fairmount Line and anything between Auburndale and Back Bay on the Framingham/Worcester Line).

I wish the people were making a more coherent argument, though. West Station connecting Harvard Sq to Longwood? Connecting to Kendall?

The first has nothing to do with rail - so just call it the 66"X" and be done with it.
The second is hypothetically possible as rail - but may never happen even if/when West Station is built.

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Now, search for "whyaduck" in page

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Read all the comments.

Pretty amazing that this would get posted during a particularly acute flurry of attacks on anyone who dares cite facts that point to private cars as causing problems and being a poor solution to moving people.

QED

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LOL!

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Oh, anon...

I think there is a big difference about calling one "stupid" as opposed to pointing out ones foibles, no, or challenging ones statements when I feel they are loosy-goosy and/or not realistic and/or not productive. I have not called anyone names on this thread, i.e. "stupid", "idiot" or whatever, in contrast to others. So my post was relevant since I was the recipient of those insults.

In regards to your words, let us see, "acute flurry of attacks on anyone who dares to cite facts (well, that is debatable) that point to private cars as causing problems..." Ahem, all I said, more or less, in between defending myself against said insults, is that in order to have a more productive conversation we should acknowledge that cars are not going to disappear any time soon and to incorporate said cars into any solutions.

So you say "private" cars are a "poor solution to moving people", um, hokey, well, what alternative modes of transportation other than cars do you suggest that can move the same number of people (very important) in and out of the city on a daily basis and please let us know how you will pay for it ('cause that is also a major issue where many fear to tread).

QED

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Again, willful ignorance

Trains, subways, light-rail, buses, BRT, cycling and walking are alternatives that can provide reliable transit networks when funded and planned properly but you've carefully setup your strawman, wrapped in the armor of convenience and funding so that it appears that private cars are THE only solution.

Motorists don't pay their fair share, you do not pay for the true cost of driving, gas, road construction, upkeep, external impacts on the health and the environment etc. Cause thats a major issue that motorists fear to acknowledge.

Lets try what London has done, where congestion pricing has reduced traffic and travel times in the city center. Automobiles down 44% and yet total number of people entering GREW 23%.

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2017/12/05/london-traffic-would-be-at-least-...

This would even address one of your biggest complaints, traffic! More transit alternatives removes more cars from the road and means more open roads for you to drive on, yay!

But I really don't expect you to give a genuine response to this, I do think its partially willful ignorance and the other part is willful trolling. Plenty of sound solutions have been presented to you but you still keep hammering on about your feelings being hurt because Swirly called you stupid? Welcome to the internet I guess.

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Trust me, if viable public

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Trust me, if viable public transportation were available, LOTS of drivers would gladly use that instead of driving. Until public transportation can provide an adequate level of service and reliability, people are going to drive.

Am I the only one

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Who thinks the guy in the photo is a real life version of Shaggy from Scoobie Doo?

I happen to agree with him that solid public transit options should be the (not just a) priority, but when I see his picture, all I can think about is Scoobie snacks.