Downtown Crossing out of commish; burst pipe is the ish

Flooding at Downtown Crossing

The T has shut its busiest station after a pipe burst and sent water flooding onto the station floors. This comes not long after a briefly flaming Green Line trolley roof at Park Street caused delays on that line.

Ben Rey, who took the photo, reports he got on the last train to Forest Hills from DTX, around 1:20 p.m. Both lines are still running, but bypassing the station.

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Comments

wonder

Wonder what spot that occurred in. During periods of rain there is usually a bucket to catch leaks near the stairs by the exit near Winter Street. There was a wet floor sign there as recently as yesterday.

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16

That's it, MassDOT Winter Resiliency has officially failed

By on

Baker needs to clean house. Anyone who was around in 2015 needs to go. They had two years, and they failed. Stop all expansion, Green Line Extension, South Coast Rail, and put all funding into the existing system. We cannot, I repeat, cannot, build a multi-billion dollar suburban trolley line as our central subway nexus crumbles.

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61

NO WAY

By on

The GLX has been hard fought and the Feds are forking over lots of $. Build it, AND fix the core system.

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21

It's a burst pipe

By on

These things happen in the winter. The local television news shows have all been running bits about how to deal with bad pipes. It will be fixed and we will move on. My guess is that by evening commute this will be a non-issue.

If the T doesn't expand, greater Boston will atrophy.

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45

Says The T Employee

By on

This is not normal.

Alongside the latest Green Line fire

This is abnormal

And before the storm even hits.

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23

So the T should cease all expansion?

By on

The Green Line fire is a bit out of line, but if you follow this website, you’ll know that there was a burst pipe in a state office building. If you don’t realize that these things happen during cold spells, I welcome you to Boston.

Still don’t work for the T.

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17

Yes

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The underground breakdowns are becoming endless

Says the rider whose fare

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Says the rider whose fare only covers 52.4% of their daily commute. If the ridership paid their “fare” share we wouldn’t have these types of problems. The system needs more money. It should come from the commuters and not subsidized by the state or feds.

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That's nice dear

Drivers pay only 57% of the cost of driving. If you pay your total, transit riders will pay theirs. Fair is fair.

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no subject

IMAGE(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/bf/17/ea/bf17ea1b8aa857778138b91de51b96a0--sprays-funny-pics.jpg)

Adam, it looks like we have a live troll with a GLX fetish. This troll has been filling up multiple threads with endless rants. Education in the legalities of transit finance and earmarked federal money and demographic realities aren't working. Can you shut off this anontrollfeed, please?

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So again

By on

You don't see any reason why a switch might be frozen on a day where it is below freezing?

Okay, even I've been griping about that, since that is one of the "winter resiliency" improvement they were supposed to have, but still, how strong are your memories of Christmas, because that's the last time we were above freezing.

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12

Ah No

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Boston will not wither if it improves it's existing metro network. In fact, it will only wither if it takes on more transportation expansion debt (Big Dig 20+ bil on the rolls and counting)

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16

Suburban trolley line my rusty metal ass

By on

SOMERVILLE is MORE densely populated than Boston, moron.

Moreover THIS IS NOT A BOSTON SYSTEM. It is a REGIONAL system run by a STATE authority.

Go away!

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22

Somerville is as dense as JP

By on

A streetcar suburb patch emanating from the denser city center. The E Trolley extension in JP was unneeded. The E Trolley extension in Somerville is unneeded

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11

JP has a heavy rail subway system

By on

That runs no more than 8 blocks from the route of the E Line. If you were serious about your support of the Arborway Line, I could see your interest, but for some reason you are writing this solely because of your hatred of the GLX. Everyone else supports this. Even the conservative Pioneer Institute supports this, though they prefer that MassDOT would privatize the T I am sure.

Humor us. What is the real reason you hate the GLX? They’ve contained the cost, and you barely cite that as an issue, so why?

A suggestion: Read carefully

By on

A larger segment of the Southwest Orange Line extension is the traditional border between JP and Roxbury. Its something people miss when they gauge everything from the wikipedia-verse. Also, look at the PI author. We all know how the top PI brass feel. If they had their way, the entire rail network is removed and replaced with buses.

Um, no

By on

The border between Roxbury and Jamaica Plain is at a 90 angle from both the Southwest Corridor and Washington Street. The closest you get is that by Jackson Square one side of the tracks is Roxbury while the other is Jamaica Plain, but one block (or traffic light) to the north the unofficial border cuts west while the unofficial border south of there follows Columbus Ave to Egleston Square, which everyone concedes is Jamaica Plain. This would mean that the southern 3 stations are pretty much in the middle of Jamaica Plain.

I’m from Boston, specifically this neck of Boston. You are not.

I give you credit for unceasingly showing your knowledge of things.

Where to start with your post

By on

Where to start with your post...

Somerville is more densely populated than Boston. Calling it a suburban trolley line is not accurate. A huge portion of the green line extension is being paid for by the federal government. It would be dumb to turn that money away. It would be dumb to stop public transit expansion in general unless you want Boston to become Detroit.

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41

The Back Bay is 5x denser than Somerville

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Somerville doesn't have any major park space or bodies of water. Imagine if you put a municipal boundary around just the Back Bay, then it becomes "the densest municipality" by leaps and bounds. I rather the T fix what it has before it builds anew. No more fires, no more flooding, no more freezing, then you can expand.

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Nope.

By on

Put Somerville's boundary over central Boston, eight to ten times denser.

Oh, this is exciting

By on

You and I are in total agreement on an issue.

I will give you the warning that I unfortunately don't heed. This guy is a total troll who is blindly obsessed with the GLX.

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13

You have no clue how this funding thing works

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The infrastructure money cannot be just magicked into operating expenses.

Here's an example from your life to help you understand:
Your Mom gives you some money for lunch at school, a small allowance, and then gives you an extra $10 to pick up bread, milk, and eggs at the store since she works later than you get out of school.

Your Mom will be very angry if you spend your lunch money and that grocery money to go out to a movie and McDonalds.

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The funding for GLX is

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The funding for GLX is earmarked and can't be moved to maintenance. Much of it is federal money that is granted specifically to be used for the project; they'll take it back if the project is cancelled or delayed, and the MBTA trying to divert the money elsewhere would be illegal. I'm sure this is true for the other projects going on too.

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15

Charlie the winter plan has a few glitches

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Trolleys on fire
Trolleys crashing
Commuter Boat docks sinking
DTC Pipes Burst
Trains breaking down everywhere.
Wait till the blizzard hits in the morning. Captain MBTA Joe Pesaturo the winter soldier of the Transit world will have a monumental challenge explaining how the plan is working.

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27

Failure of the winter plan? Not exactly.

By on

Trolleys on fire, trolleys crashing, and trains breaking down everywhere can and do happen anytime (unfortunate but true). Plus, the pipe that burst at DTX was not the MBTA's pipe, but was between Washington Street and DTX. The reason the station flooded was simply a demonstration of how well the law of gravity works.

Regarding the Hingham ferry pier, when''s the last time the harbor completely froze over?

As for Joe P., he won't have a problem explaining how well the plan is working until Friday, when they try to deal with normal crowds and encounter the inevitable "day after the big storm" failures.

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12

One alarm to rule them all...

Seems the Orange Line fail triggered all the alarms in the neighborhood. I was at a noon screening at the AMC on The Common when the film came to an abrupt halt, the emergency lights on either side of the screen started flashing, and a robotic voice began to monotonously intone,“ Fire detected.”. The whole complex emptied out with everyone directed to wait across the street in the Common. After 15 minutes two fire trucks pulled up. One left almost immediately; the other about 5 minutes later, and we were let back in. The theater’s security people told us that alarms in the neighborhood are ‘interconnected” so if one goes off so do the others.