Frappe

A milkshake or malted elsewhere, it's basically ice cream, milk and chocolate syrup blended together. The 'e' is silent. Despite the chocolate syrup, it actually comes in many flavors. "My favorite was a coffee frappe with two scoops of ice cream in Guild's Drug Store (pronounced like guile), which stood on Boylston and Exeter until this past year when they wrecked it,'' Dee Burton reported in 1997.

Frappe reviews

Glossary: 

Comments

re: Frappe

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CAN YOU SEND ME THE BEST WAY TO MAKE A FRAPPE.

re: Frappe

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Put ice cream in a blenderput milk in a blender (the more you put in the thinner it'll be)blendthat's it

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re: Frappe

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When I lived in Arrid-zonna I was talking to another New Englander about "Friendly's" and mentioned how I would love to have a "Fribble". No one but the New Englander and I knew what we were talking about. They all thought it has something to do with sex. She and I laughed so hahd I thought we would pee ourselves!

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re: Frappe

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send anything on frappe's please!

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re: Frappe

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you gotta love the frappes.. chocolate are the best.

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re: Frappe

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OMG....give me a Brigham's black and white frappe!!!! Its been years since I have had one. I now live outside Baltimore and they think I am nuts.....but I am just a HAPPY Bostonian waiting to go back home :-) I had forgotten all the things I say and this is the best site. I have printed out every word....its PISSAH!!!

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re: Frappe

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Take a glass put a good spoonfull of Nescaffe in and sugar if you wish. Half fill with ice cold water and if you have a very small whisk (electric) whisk for a few seconds. Add milk if desired or try a whiskey liquer mmmmmmm

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re: Frappe

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Does anyone know why some people inRhode Island call frappes/shakes cabinets?

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Brigham's ice cream is the best and their Frappes are no exception! Everytime my family buys ice cream at the store, we always buy Brigham's, and everytime we go out for ice cream, we always go to Brigham's. Well, with one exception, and that is Cabot's in Newton!

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re: Frappe

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I was visiting relatives in Missouri and asked the waitress at some restaurant for a "black and white frappe" without thinking. Of course, everyone looked at me like I had three heads, and I had to explain that it was a milkshake with vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup.

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re: Frappe

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when I was in highschool I worked in a New England icecream shop outside of boston.The perfect frappe:You need 3 parts ice cream to 1 part milk.(Remember the more the icecream the thicker it will be)Then you need a "binding" agent. That would be a syrup of some kind. Chocolate, Strawberry, Vanilla or Coffee. Autocrat tends to put out syrups of the "other than chocolate" variety.They are in a 1950's looking like bottle next to the hershey and nesquick stuff.How much syrup depends on you. I tend to put about 1-2 heavy squirts (at max a 1/4 cup for every 2 cup milk). It depends on taste. The easiest thing is make chocolate milk to taste for your self then add it to ice cream in a blender.If you don't do this, it will be thick-clumpy and watery at the same time.Some folks also use raw eggs as a binding agent. As a uncooked food, its a bit of a risk and I would not suggest it due to possible food poisoning.You can blend in real berries and nuts if you like, just make sure that they are blended beforehand with a bit of water so that they do not block up a straw when you try to drink it.Do not over load the mixer or blender. IF you do, especially with an open top industrial/vintage one, you will be in for a BIG surprise and clean up task!As for a "Milk shake" I have explained many times to my midwestern husband that out here it is just ice blended with milk and a flavor syrup....and to beware when you order it in a resturant, it will be flavored milk or an ice shake.

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re: Frappe

When I was in the Navy I spent some time in Boston, and ordered a chocolate milkshake which turned out to be chocolate milk, I mentioned that I was hoping for some ice cream added to the shake, it was then I was told "so you want a frappe?", after tasting it, I asked for even more ice cream to be added, it was then I was told the next time I come in I should ask for a chocolate "cabinet", or extra of ice cream added.

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re: Frappe

A Friendly's Fribble is a frappe, right?The problem with frappes is that they often are so thick that after you drink them for a while you realize that you've sucked all the milk and flavoring out of the ice crystals and are left with some weird gelato stuff in the bottom of your cup.

re: Frappe

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I love frappe's but am diabetic. Needingredients for any kind of sugar free frappe. Vannilla is my favorite flavor.

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re: Frappe

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where that hell did they come from!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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re: Frappe

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hahahahahaha.....i thought a frappe was a word that friendly's made up. i had no idea it was a boston thing..lolol

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re: Frappe

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People think I'm crazy when I mention that I used to see "cabinets" used for frappes in Rhode Island. I swear I'm not crazy.

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re: Frappe

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Brigham's? Are you people nuts? The best ice cream on the PLANET, and therefore the best frappe, is from Kimball Farm, in Westford, MA (http://www.kimballfarm.com). They make everything right there -- dozens of flavors of ice cream, and even the syrup is homemade.Also, frappe is from the French verb "frapper" -- to beat. Appropriate, no?

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I grew up in southwest Missouri, and I've lived in Chicago for the past 14 years, but I lived in Boston from 1979 to 1987 (plus a little bit of time in Brocton, in 1974), and I remember being amused that Bostonians used a different vocabulary for some foods and drinks.The frappe is an obvious example. (I don't remember hearing the term "cabinet" in connection with cold drinks.) As a person new to the Boston area, I remember being very disappointed when I ordered a milkshake, only to learn that it had no ice cream!I also experienced my first "egg cream" in Cambridge. That drink is really indigenous to New York, but they have it in the Boston area, too.Another Boston eccentricity that amused me was the use of the term "tonic" to describe carbonated soft drinks such as Coca Cola, Sprite, etc. Perhaps the use of that term hearkens back to the days when some soft drinks actually contained small amounts of cocaine and/or other drugs. (Even today, Wikipedia says that Coca Cola contains tiny traces of cocaine, but nowhere nearly as much as it once did.) When I heard the term "tonic" in reference to such drinks (known in the Midwest as "pop" or "soda" or "soda pop"), it didn't appeal to me, since it made me think of my father's hair tonic (e.g., Vitalis)!By the way, I loved Friendly's when I lived in Boston (and earlier, when I lived for about 1/2 year in the Brocton area). I don't remember drinking many frappes there, but they had great sundaes! Brigham's was pretty good, too.While you're on the subject of frappes, be sure to look up the term "frappe" at Wikipedia.org. Their entry for the term briefly mentions the New England use of the term, but the article mostly talks about a Greek coffee drink which is very similar to a drink I discovered by accident, except that the Greek version (served cold) uses "spray dried" coffee, whereas my homemade version uses Taster's Choice, mixed with non-dairy creamer and water and sugar, then shaken vigorously in a closed jar (creating lots of foam, albeit foam which isn't as thick as the Greek version). When poured over ice, it's delicious.For a tasty variation, mix my "Americanized coffee frappe" described in the previous paragraph with vanilla- or coffee-flavored ice cream, to make a milkshake. A great way to beat the summertime heat! And it's the closest thing you're likely to find to a drink which combines the New England type of frappe with something which is somewhat similar to the Greek type of frappe. I haven't tried mixing chocolate syrup with it, but I imagine that would make it taste even better.

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re: Frappe

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As an ice cream expert, did you ever hear of a chocolate covered ice cream bar being called an "iceberg"?

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re: Frappe

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I'm from Littleton aka bout 5 mins from Kimballs and omg all I can remember is everybody skipping school and going there on the first day they were open in the season. That and we'd stop at Fudruckers whenever we were coming from Boston. The good old days...

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re: Frappe

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I came here to find out how to make a frappe and what did I exit this site with? WASTED TIME!!! Please post some REAL helpful recipies!!

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re: Frappe

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Anita and others -Presuming you have a blender (and not a frappe maker like ice cream shops have) here's the PROPER way to make a frappe:6 ounces of COLD milk2 medium scoops of ice cream2 tablespoons of syrup in the same flavor as the ice creamThese are the measurements the Autocrat company (the coffee syrup manufacturer) reccommends, and I find they work well. For a larger frappe, double everything.Put all the ingredients together in a COLD blender pitcher - one that has sat empty in the refrigerator for at least 15 minutes. Switch on and mix until thin, about a 30 seconds to 1 minute. Pulse the blender (or switch off and on) a couple times. Pour into a glass and serve. That's it - but that's not it. There's a chemistry essential to frappes that you have to pay attention to.For one thing, the blender pitcher has to be COLD because the milk has to be stay COLD. The reason these have to be cold is so that the ice cream needs to be MIXED instead of MELTED. What you want to have happen is this: some of the ice cream is mixed with milk and air, while the rest is broken down into crystals, which separate and the glom back together again. That's what gives you the sensation of "melting on your tongue" as you drink it. If you put milk and ice cream together in a warm vessel, the milk immediately starts to warm and the ice cream immediately starts to melt - and they continue warming and melting while the blender is going, until they reach temperature equilibrium with the blender pitcher. Melted ice cream can't break down and then reattach like frozen ice cream will. So, cold is essential.For another thing, you don't want to use too much ice cream. Most milkshakes/frappes are made with WAY too much ice cream. One of the most important ingredients in a frappe is AIR. Air, whipped into the milk by the blender or mixer, is what gives a frappe its light texture and frothy head. If you use too much ice cream in the milk/ice cream/syrup combination, you're essentially keeping air out of your frappe, and it will be more like a glop of ice cream. (Also, this air is warm and tends to melt the ice cream - that's another reason the milk and the blender pitcher have to be COLD.)I hope that helps. Basically, keep in mind COLD and AIR.The tendency in ice cream shops is to make milkshakes "thick", I guess because people think they're getting a good deal on all that ice cream. Not surprisingly, these cement-like glops generally don't taste all that great.A frappe is a milk beverage with ice cream in it, NOT an ice cream dessert made with milk. It should be relatively thin. If you can't drink it through a straw, or drink it all down in one libation, then it's too thick.(The person who said "3 parts ice cream to 1 part milk" presumably misspoke. Those ratios will give you a disgusting cement-like glop. No doubt the pimply-faced eejits working in ice cream shops will give you that, but it's not a tenth as good as a real frappe.)Posted by Peter Mullaney at May 19, 2007 11:56 PM

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re: Frappe

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its funny i live in san diego, and nobody out here knows what the hell a frappe is. They all call it milkshakes. Brighams has the best vanilla frappes along with J.P. Licks. man i miss their ice cream

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re: Frappe

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the best frappee i have ever had is the gloria geans arnots time tam one they seriously are to die for, if anyone knows how to make them could you please tell me.

re: Frappe

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LOL I like Derek's analysis on how to make a frappe. Nice job Derek :)

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re: Frappe

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When you ask for a Frappe, what you get is one or two scoops of ice cream. Day run it in da blenda foh-evah an' all ya get iz a mout fulla foam. When I grew up in Fa'haven, I don't remember "cabinet", but a cabinet is what you need to ask for.In Mass, everything is over-sweetened. I got a thick coffee frappe at McDonalds in Fa'haven and it was so sweet, I almost spit it out. Everybody is fat and toothless.When I go back there, I have to have Frozen Pudding ice cream. The recipe is Cherry Vanilla with rum flavoring and date puree.

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re: Frappe

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i have been work in starbucks&baskin robbins. i think the important thing to make a best frappe is frozen and thicky. maybe you can put a chocolate bars or white chocolate in your frappe. thats so good.and youve got a sprinkle taste. have a nice try.

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re: Frappe

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A frappe is a milk shake w/ ice cream, pref. Brighams, in the 60's Friendly's fribble, a powder and ice milk concoction( not a frappe) was called an Awful-Awful, as in , I suppose, 'it's awfully, awfully good. Steve.

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re: Frappe

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Frappe is the Greek national drink!! Any other drink using the term frappe is BS and is similar to the crap frappucinno that starbucks makes. It is made by using Nescafe instant coffee and sugar. After you put these two about 2-3 teaspoons of the coffee and desired sugar you put enough cold water in to cover them. You use a electric whisk in the glass until it foams up about 3/4 of the way up on the glass. Use a tall thin glass. Add 3 ice cubes, cold water to fill and milk is optional. Rather than milk, what makes it taste better is carnation canned evaporated milk.

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re: Frappe

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Kimball's Farm has the best Frappes and the second best is Herrell's in Harvard Square with Brighams third best, I don't really like the Friendly Fribble and I don't like the Frappes at Friendlys either.

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re: Frappe

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A frappe is mostly icecream and a little bit of milk.A milk shake is mostly milk blended with a little bit of ice cream.Frappes are thick and heavy where milk shakes are easily consumed.

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re: Frappe

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The best frappes, with the perfect consistancy, are made at Erikson's in Maynard. They've been made the same way with the same homemade ice cream for 70 years. No contest.

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re: Frappe

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The best Frappe i ever had was from my friend Cosmo at the Landing in Southie. But, like most good things people have to ruin it and they ripped the place down. I have yet to have another Frappe that could equal or better the ones i used to get from Landing.Most people might remember it as Kelly's Landing. :)

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re: Frappe

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umm lol in aus frappes are just ice, milk or water and flavouring blended hahah americans have icream...typical jks

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re: Frappe

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Frappe is actually Greek first made in 1957 en(dot)wikipedia(dot)org/wiki/Greek_frappƩ_coffee after that in the mid-60s turned to what you show.

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re: Frappe

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I thought Awful Awful's were from Newport Creamery not Friendly's?

re: Frappe

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Nobody even mentioned the DQ. Tom Deftos who owned the DQ at the Brockton / Avon line made the best black and white frappes I've ever had. I went to a DQ on Sanibel Island, FL and asked for a black and white frappe and the kid just smiled and whipped it up. That was real good too. I think the softserve blends with the milk and syrup better

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No, they're not real frappes.

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No, they're not real frappes. They're a lot thinner and they're made with some type of mix. Even Friendly's is quick to point out that they're not frappes.

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Frappe

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I grew up in Western, MA and recall frappes with great fondness (as well as every other offering at the "Creamy"...ah, the sausage grinders). Perhaps my memory is failing me, but I thought there was a difference between milkshakes and frappes. Maybe I'm thinking of something else. Frappes and....? I stumbled upon this website looking for the answer to this very question. I'm hungry!

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cabinet drink

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When I was a kid in RI I remember that I use to go in a drug store that had a soda fountain, like a bar for soft drinks. When I ordered a cabinet the nozzles that nozzles that dispensed the liquid parts of the drink were enclosed in a wooden cabinet. Now, I'm just guessing here, but I wonder if that's where it came from. I mean I can't see anything in the etymology / derivation of the word that would give a hint. Unless it's from a foreign language.

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Frappe

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Huh! That is not how a Frappe is made - what you are putting together sounds more like an iced coffee.

Just remember this - a Frappe is made with ice cream/syrup/milk. The more ice cream, the thicker it is.

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Mcdonald's Frappe

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Why the hell Mcdonald's put so much sugar in their Frappe's.
Considering the way this country is about obesity, diabetic, etc., you
would think they would use another substitue. Splenda they may use but
it includes chemicals. There are other subsitutes they can use, stevia and
truvia are good plant sweetners. Please pass this on to the executives of Mcdonald's
because this is ridiculous. We have been promoting good health in this country
and Mcdonald's insist on making us diabetics.

I threw the free Frappe in the trash.
Nothing but sugar, sugar, sugar.

Thanks,

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Frappes

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A frappe is 3 parts milk, 2 parts ice cream and 1 part syrup. It's thin, frothy, airy and cold. The ice cream particles melt on your tongue as you drink it.

A milk shake is 3 parts milk, 1 part syrup, shaken in a shaker. Not mixed in a blended. Sometimes malt is added for a malted milk shake.

The rest of the world may call drinks with ice cream "milk shakes." If so, the rest of the world are idiots.

The rest of the world may think big concrete globs of ice cream with a little milk are tasty. If so, the rest of the world are idiots.

If the Greek frappe was first made in 1957 then it's not the original frappe, because they were selling frappes in New England before the war.

They're called frappes. New England invented them, so we get to say what's in them and we get to say what they're called.

These are the facts. Ignore them at your peril.

You may go.

Splenda they may use but it

Splenda they may use but it includes chemicals

Chemicals? Oh, the horror! I never let chemicals get anywhere near me - my body is a chemical-free zone.

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I lol'd

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Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go heat up some carbon for lunch.

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frappe

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Back in the day, fifties and sixties, frappe was serve at teas and wedding receptions. it was made with half sherbert and half vanilla ice cream and ginger ale in a punch bowl with the punch cups.
It could be the black version of frappe.

Frappes, cabinets, milkshakes, fribbles, Awful Awfuls

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Let me set the record straight. In Rhode Island and Massachusetts, a milkshake contains no ice cream, only milk and syrup. In the rest of the country, a milk shake contains milk, syrup, and ice cream. What is called a milkshake for most of the country is called a frappe in Massachusetts and a cabinet in Rhode Island. The Awful Awful is a thick ice milk shake served at the Newport Creamery in Rhode Island. Friendly's in Massachusetts also served an Awful Awful. Newport Creamery sued for copyright infringement so Friendly's changed its drink to the Fribble.

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