History

By - 7/17/17 - 11:31 am
R. Schell

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By - 7/13/17 - 1:23 pm
Queen Elizabeth and Mayor White in 1976

In 1976, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip let bygones be bygones and visited Boston as part of the Revolution bicentennial. The British Consulate in Boston has posted some photos from the visit, including one of Gov. Dukakis welcoming the Queen at Logan Airport and this one of Mayor White bringing her into Boston City Hall.

On July 11, Prince Phillip presented an eagle statue to the Bostonian Society: Read more.

By - 7/6/17 - 11:40 am
Map of smelly Boston

In 1878, the Boston Board of Health published this map of the smelliest place in Boston and Cambridge. As the Boston City Archives tells us, "the biggest culprits were sewer outlets and 'offensive trades.' "

By - 7/2/17 - 12:51 pm

J.L. Bell introduces us to the mystery of the missing royal seals in the waning days of British rule in Boston.

By - 7/1/17 - 1:27 pm
Old MBTA map showing Arborway line

Pat from Boston notes that Hynes station still has maps showing the E Line going all the way to Arborway (even if in the "temporarily suspended" format), something it hasn't actually done since Dec. 29, 1985.

By - 6/27/17 - 11:22 am
Mystery people

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can figure out who these people are, where they are and what they're doing. See it larger.

By - 6/23/17 - 10:54 am

With a two-year restoration project nearly done, Patrick Kennedy of Suffolk Construction takes a look at the one thing without which the work wouldn't be possible, at least not without hauling the ship onto a muddy embankment: The dry dock.

Undefeated in the War of 1812, Constitution was already a legend when she entered the brand-new, Quincy-granite dry dock in Charlestown, Massachusetts, on June 24, 1833. (That’s 184 years from this Saturday.)

By - 6/20/17 - 12:32 pm
Mobile station in old Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By - 6/18/17 - 10:11 am

Joy of Sox recounts the Gamblers' Riot, 100 years ago today.

By - 6/17/17 - 7:41 pm
Hotel Vendome commemoration

Stevil attended the memorial service on the Commonwealth Mall today, on the 45th anniversary of the death of nine Boston firefighters when the fire-weakened Hotel Vendome at Dartmouth Street collapsed.

Copyright Stevil. Posted in the Universal Hub pool on Flickr.

By - 6/9/17 - 9:08 am

WGBH takes a look at the Confederate memorial on Georges Island; reports Gov. Baker would rather have the thing put somewhere else.

By - 6/5/17 - 12:53 pm
Minutemen firing muskets in downtown Boston

Ted Folkman watched the musketfire downtown as the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company held its annual June procession.

By - 6/1/17 - 12:58 pm
Kids on a street in Boston, but where?

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By - 5/29/17 - 10:01 am

John A. Andrew Post 15, Dept. of Mass., and Geo. G. Meade Post 38, Dept. of N. Y., Grand Army of the Republic, commemorate Memorial Day on Boston Common in 1886.

Photo from the BPL. Posted under this Creative Commons license.

By - 5/28/17 - 4:11 pm
Gulf Super Service Station in Coolidge Corner

This postcard, sometime from between 1930 and 1945, shows the Gulf "Super-Service Station" at 1309 Beacon St., in Coolidge Corner - where the Trader Joe's building and parking lot is today (and of course, then, as now, that was Brookline, not Boston).

Postcard from the BPL Massachusetts postcard collection. Posted under this Creative Commons license.

By - 5/26/17 - 9:25 am

No, we don't have any statues of Robert E. Lee - our memorials for slavery supporters are more subtle than that. Kevin Peterson wonders if it's time for some name changing on places such as Winthrop Square, named for slave-owning John Winthrop, and Faneuil Hall, named for slave-owning Peter Faneuil.

By - 5/16/17 - 11:30 am
Street scene in old Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

By - 5/15/17 - 11:26 am

The Yiddish Book Center in Amherst has compiled some oral histories of vertical shtetls, Blue Hill Avenue and, of course, Leonard Nimoy's West End.

By - 5/12/17 - 9:38 am

J.L. Bell makes the case that the painting the Tate Gallery acquired last year is not really by John Singleton Copley:

I can imagine Copley being influenced by the recent “conversation pieces” by Zoffany and others. He might have studied examples, even sketching figures from them in his style. And then he tried out the form with his own family as models, creating the biggest group portrait he’d made to date. But I’m not convinced he took an one-off side journey into the style of a second-rate provincial portraitist.