Provincial New Yorkers think Bostonians don't eat burgers

It's true! Look at this headline from today's Times: New York Burger Stand on Boston's Seafood Turf?

Yes, it's all about the godawful decision Michael Ross has forced us into: Turn a giant unused men's room on the Common into a frappey New York Shake Shack or rent it out to a local who wants to sell Freedom Trail Ketchup with his burgers. Or as the Times frames it:

First the reviled Yankees won the World Series; now Shake Shack, the New York burger stand, might stake a claim in one of Boston's most sacred spaces.

The paper mentions our very own Jay Fitzgerald, first off the blog on the topic, although, naturally, being the Times, they don't link to his post or, for that matter, even bother to check whether the outrage they attribute to him actually came from his site (it doesn't).

But maybe I'm just cranky because I haven't had lunch yet. Maybe I'll go out into the backyard and rustle up some lobster.

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Comments

I had that same thought.

I am shocked by the idea that there once was a restroom at the Common. I hate having to wait in line at the Starbucks. But it's all about money. Public accomodations require publicly financed upkeep. Give it to a private vendor and things will be kept in good running order. There just isn't much investor interest in privatized johns unfortunately.

But they close super early

One nice summer day, around 6:15pm I went to meet my wife on the Common. Every single bathroom was closed for the day, there is nothing you can do except go to the Starbucks. It's ridiculous because the whole park is full of people, and there's not a public bathroom in the whole place.

"The seating is likely to be outdoors."

Good luck with that, fellas. I guess these Shake Shack nimrods are counting on global warming to make that possible the 6 or so months a year when only mad dogs & Eskimos sit out in the Beantown sun.
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"Never write if you can speak; never speak if you can nod; never nod if you can wink"-- and the Eliot Spitzer codicil -- "never put it in e-mail."