The unfrozen north bank of the Charles

Galen Moore asks:

Anyone know why the north bank of the Charles won't freeze between the Longfellow and the Museum of Science? It's creepy.

Neighborhoods: 

Comments

Some answers via Twitter

By on
up
16

salt water

By on

the ocean/harbor feeds salt water into.

up
16

Ye old dam

By on

The Museum is on the old dam, of course, and the old sluices are open on the north side right about where you approach the canal that leads to the Galleria. I've paddleboarded over there and seen them open and flowing. I could assume that most of the river is flowing through that sluice or sluices or whatever you call em.

up
16

Cogen feeds into the steam grid

They were digging up Cambridge Parkway (the street there) over the last year & a half or so and I was asking one of the workers what they were doing. He said they were replacing the steam line that runs from the Kendall co-gen plant down to near North Station which is part of a steam grid for industrial heating so despite the insulation it probably still keeps the ground temp high enough to affect it.

up
14

River no frozen

By on

It may be due to the fact that the water is brackish and has a high salt content. The bubblers and the locke activity could be helping as well.

up
12

Ha!

By on

I like the flesh-eating eels theory.

up
31

I think we have another

By on

I think we have another winner for the Inappropriate Use of the Word 'Creepy' Award.

up
16

The mob keeps it open so they

By on

The mob keeps it open so they can easily deposit bodies, which won't be found until the college rowers get out there in late spring.

up
25

Go walk along the shore by

By on

Go walk along the shore by the marinas on a really cold day (10Âş) and watch the bubblers keeping the water moving and liquid.

up
14

I suggest you look at the DCR

By on

I suggest you look at the DCR's field in front of Massachusetts General Hospital.

They routinely dump poisons on it to keep alive sickly grass which will die without it.

A few years ago, the regular poisons would not work, so they dumped even stronger stuff. The next day, the Charles was dead from the harbor to the Mass. Ave. bridge and the crud comes back yearly.

The DCR is so fond of poisons on the Charles River, they destroyed the responsible grass and Magazine Beach which had survived the better part of a century without poisons. So they destroyed the responsible stuff and imported the sickly stuff. They then destroyed part of the playing fields to create expensive drains to keep the poisons out of the Charles River.

Next step? Governor Patrick's House Bill H3332, bond authorization for "Historical Parkways" which will destroy hundreds of trees between Magazine Beach and the Longfellow Bridge.

up
14