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JP could become haggis hotspot

The Boston Licensing Board decides tomorrow whether to approve a beer and wine license for the city's first Scottish pub, which would move into the old Zon's space at 2 Perkins St. in Hyde Square.

Owner Jason Waddleton said that among Wee Angel's offerings would be both meat and vegetarian versions of the traditional Scottish dish haggis. Haggis traditionally consists of a variety of an animal's innards, cooked in its stomach or a lining for three hours with oatmeal and spices. He said he's also trying to convince his chef to try haggis burgers.

In addition to traditional Scottish pub fare - which also includes a meat broth called Bovril - Wee Angel would offer acoustic music several times a week.

The concept drew praise from local elected officials, who praised both Waddleton - who currently works at Matt Murphy's in Brookline - and the idea of a neighborhood bistro filling the void left by the shutdown of Zon's and Bella Luna's move.

"Once again, JP is leading the way in the diversity of restaurants," City Councilor John Tobin said.

Wee Angel - the name is an homage to the Angell Memorial animal hospital across the street - would be open until 1 a.m. under its license request, with food served until midnight. He's also planning on acoustic music and weekend brunch.

One potential issue is whether the board has any alcohol licenses left to grant. Waddleton's attorney, Joseph Hanley, suggested the board transfer the old Zon's license to Waddleton. The board had a hearing scheduled for yesterday on revoking Zon's license for non-use. Nobody from Zon's appeared and the board will also vote on that matter tommorrw.

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Comments

A vegetarian version of a dish made up of a variety of animal innards?

"I'll have the spam, spam, spam, spam, and spam please. And could you hold the spam?"

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A lot of pubs in Scotland have a vegetarian haggis on offer if they also provide the real deal. In Edinburgh I liked the veg haggis at The Auld Hoose better than their meat haggis (it's my local when I'm in Edinburgh, so I've had both dishes a lot).

I forget which quasi-Irish pub it was in Cambridge years ago that would do haggis this time of year for Burns Nicht (and also I think in the fall for the feast of St. Andrew), but it was truly horrifying stuff. I think the cook (a Pakistani) knew how to make haggis primarily from watching old Billy Connolly comedy routines when he lived in Dublin, so he assumed when it was completely inedible it was about right. It was a waste of a perfectly good sheep.

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This is the local news story of the day, by a long way. I say that even though I am a long way away now, sort of in DC (Silver Spring would be more accurate, and Wheaton MD more accurate still). I am a sort of Scot because I was born in Inverness (albeit of English parents who moved back to England when I was very young).

I found myself compelled to post about the story, and to list no fewer than eight reasons why it might be found horrifying. See:
http://andrew.wandernote.com/2010/01/angel-of-the-...

I was going to turn the reasons into a poll, but don't have time right now. Anyone else who wants to is more than welcome.

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"Beer and wine" license? Please educate me... would that actually limit them to only beer and wine (i.e. no scotch or other liquor)? Is this something that could be built up on in the future (adding to the license later). Also, how is the number of available licenses determined... is it ever increased with the population?

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But in practical terms, that means beer and wine, and, yes, it means they can serve only that - no hard stuff. Good question whether it can be extended in the future, I don't know - anybody with more knowledge out there?

As for the number of licenses, every single community in the state EXCEPT Boston has the number set based on population. In Boston, the legislature, harkening back to the days when the Brahmins in charge of the state hated the Irish in charge of Boston, set a different rule for Boston: Basically, the legislature sets whatever the hell number it wants. You may recall that's what (allegedly) got Dianne Wilkerson in trouble - she managed to maneuver a bill through the legislature to increase the number of licenses in Boston, one of which would then be guaranteed for her pal with the bra-stuffing bills (who turned out to be working for the FBI).

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so it can't be only Boston that the legislature sets numbers for.

Anyone know whether a malt-and-wine license includes cider?

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So if Somerville has a population change, they can petition for extra license. I thought it was 1 full license for every 5,000 or 10,000 people. And I would guess the cider would depend on the alcohol content.

Wine: Wines”, all fermented alcoholic beverages made from fruits, flowers, herbs or vegetables and containing not more than twenty-four per cent of alcohol by volume at sixty degrees Fahrenheit, except cider containing not more than three per cent, or containing more than six per cent, of alcohol by weight at sixty degrees Fahrenheit.

Malt: all alcoholic beverages manufactured or produced by the process of brewing or fermentation of malt, with or without cereal grains or fermentable sugars, or of hops, and containing not more than twelve per cent of alcohol by weight

Liqueur or cordial : all alcoholic beverages manufactured or produced by mixing or redistilling neutral spirits, brandy, gin, or other distilled spirits with or over fruits, flowers, plants or pure juices therefrom, or other natural flavoring materials, or with extracts derived from infusions, percolations, or maceration of such materials and containing no less than two and one-half percent sugar by weight.

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...dammit, the packy's closed. Must you? ;o)

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There's a good variety of stuff that's legally beer, like Mike's and many ciders.

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I heard that the owner left town, but that license should be worth something, no? Even if it was only beer and wine...

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