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Ritziest arrests of the week as police bust up hotel party despite dire warnings about the consequences

Boston Police report busting up a grand old time at the Ritz-Carlton early this morning and arresting four young gentlemen on a variety of charges. Officers declined the party-giver's request to leave, now, and grimly carried on despite one party-goer's warning they would face the wrath of his connections, police say.

Police say officers responded to the downtown hotel around 3 a.m., on the request of hotel security, who said they were unable to quell the party:

While making their way towards the room, officers observed several individuals in possession of alcoholic beverages exiting the location. Once in front of the room, officers looked inside and observed approximately 25 – 30 people making noise and consuming alcohol inside the room. Upon entering the location, officers asked to speak to the legal tenants. When nobody took responsibility for the party, officers began turning the lights on and off while, at the same time, instructing everyone to leave the location. For a short time, most of the party-goers flat out ignored the officers and the legal instructions that had been given. Finally, one of the party-goers, stating that he was the legal tenant, approached the officers and told them that they were no longer welcome inside his place and that they – they being the officers – needed to leave.

Sultan Alhokair, 22, of Boston, was put under arrest and charged with being the keeper of a disorderly house and resisting arrest. Angelos Markakis, 22, of New York, was then cuffed and charged with resisting arrest and witness intimidation when he tried to block Alhokair's arrest, police say, adding Markakis warned:

You have no idea who you are messing with. You are going to be in big trouble. I have friends who will take care of you.

Abdul Alathim, 21, was also arrested on a charge of resisting arrest.

The night did not end with those arrests, police say:

As officers were transporting the suspects to Area A-1 (Downtown) for booking, officers observed and noted that a car, filled with people from the party, was following closely behind the prisoner transport wagon. Upon arriving at the station, officers approached the vehicle and asked the operator for his license. When the suspect stated that he didn’t have one, officers took the operator into custody.

Abdullah Saud, 23, of Cambridge, was charged with operating without a license.

Innocent, etc.

Earlier:
Harvard Law student's legal acumen fails to impress Boston police.

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Comments

Somehow I think the little trustfunders are going to find out that "their connections" don't take too kindly to having to bail them out of police matters and that suddenly the purse strings have tightened significantly.

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Well if the Google is right, then they are pretty well connected. I think they'll be able to make bail.

One's father is CEO of a billion dollar company in Saudi Arabia, another is the (grand) son of the King / Crown Prince??

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In that case they really should be more concerned about what their family is going to do to them rather than the authorities.

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I had a friend and classmate who was one of the wealthy children from Arab countries who attend school in the US. He once told me that the cardinal rule of attending college in the US was "enjoy America, but don't get caught!".

This will be way more complicated for them than many here can possibly appreciate. It will be taken care of within the family, and, suffice it to say, these kids are in real trouble.

Many families use their extended family networks to exercise control and accountability over the family youngsters in the US. Usually, an older relative's life in the states is subsidized by the family so that person can corral the youngsters going to school here. These kids got way out of line and it won't go unnoticed or be dismissed at home.

Sure, the family may work to get them out of the US legal system consequences BUT they will see sanctions at home. They may be recalled to the home base - with all the attendant restrictions. This interrupts their education and may mean a domestic university degree under parietal rules. They may certainly be restricted as "not trustworthy" in family business dealings due to their intemperate behavior, which will hurt their future careers for a time. This is, of course, in addition to any number of "less civilized" punishments they could find themselves receiving - like a good flogging.

That isn't to say that working the US judicial system and handling things "in family" is necessarily a good thing - this is only to say that it is unlikely these brats will go unpunished.

BTW, unless they are diplomatically attached, they do have to carry passports. Don't be ridiculous people.

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They have to carry passports to travel obviously, but not when roaming Boston. We're not Arizona. And even Arizona is not Arizona, the law was suspended by a judge.

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There was a statement made4 that they didn't need them to get into the US or some such rot. Even diplomats have to carry papers when crossing borders!

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Kind of makes you wish all those old stories of the Boston police were real. Sounds like these asshats need a reason never to return to Boston.

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The last guy is my favorite.

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"Don't you know who I am?" Yep, that's really going to give them pause.

Your filthy rich relations can use their influence to make this go away after the fact, but in the meantime, junior emir, you're spending the night in the pokey. Try not to stand next to that drunk in the corner: you probably don't want projectile vomit on your Gucci sneakers there.

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"Don't you know who I am?" I watched a detail cop at the Hard Rock give the best answer ever;

"Pal, if you have to ask me that question, then no one knows who you are".

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Please tell us more about this story.

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It was an Aerosmith event, and I was hanging outside, waiting for my client and some guy kept insisting he was on the list. The publicist lady told him 3 times he wasn't and that's when the cop stepped in and told him he had to go. That's when he said it. After the cop said that to him, he left with a big hangdog face. Someone told me later it might have been the youngest Lyons brother, whose name escapes me.

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I'll see you guys later at Cafe Armani for the after-bail party! And they talk about ugly Americans...

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Send these scumbags back to the desert.

And anybody who sides against me on this is an apologist for criminals and is welcome to join them.

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I A RACIST. ANYONE WHO CHALLENGE ME IS UN-FUCKING-AMERICAN.

WATCH I NOW SMASH BEER CAN AGAINST FACE.

Your well-documented racist/anti-immigration views are boring. Perhaps the owner leaves them up for the humor, but for someone posting under a French-Canadian name, where do you get off? How, exactly, did your family "earn the privilege," as you call it?

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Arabs are white. I think ethnic prejudice or bigotry, not racial, is the term you're looking for.

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I think it's OK to lump all prejudice based on national origin, language, color, and physical characteristics suggesting ancestry under "racism."

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I didn't interfere with a police officer or threaten one.

Me 1, these (expletives) 0.

And please explain to me what part of my comment was "racist."

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Where are my peasant-whipping manservants when I need them?

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The depressing part is that their wealth and connections certainly are going to prevent any real consequences. Yes, they spent some time in jail -probably very little time- but their lives of privilege will continue.

Imagine what they do in their home countries. Or imagine being their neighbors there, afraid to complain.

I loathe inconsiderate asshats of all strata. I especially loathe foreign ones.

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I doubt these sorts of people even have to carry passports to get in and out of this country. No TSA patdowns for these darlings and favorite sons of Saudi Arabia I imagine.

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TSA doesn't handle private charters. I doubt these little bastards have ever set foot on a commercial flight.

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Yup. Silly me. I bet you are right. No commercial flights for these Little Lord Fauntleroys.

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Where's Sharia Law when you really need it?

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I missed it if someone already said this, but it seems that the biggest problem for these guys could be...

that if they are not US persons, they could be deported if they are found guilty. If that were the case, it might actually really screw things up for them, because it would also prevent them from coming back to the US or transacting business here for a good long while.

I don't have time at the moment to look up whether any of the charges are for felonies, but ICE generally does not look kindly on those these days. Of course, if they really have any connections, that's where they will come in handy - not so much with the BPD.

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Having spent many hours sitting in front of hotels, waiting for any number of Saudi royals to wake up and come down for their daily shopping, I can tell you with complete confidence what's going to happen here.

Nothing.

They may have spent the night in jail and they may even make it to the arraignment, but that is as far as it goes. The generic State Dept guy will show up at the courthouse, or even just make that phone call and that's the last we'll hear about it. Trust me, I've seen it happen many times. Unless of course it's Saudi women who get in trouble here. Woo-hoo, watch out! Same scenario as with the men, but with one difference; the women have an ass whoopin' waiting for them back home.

Saudi's used to have much more of a presence here before 9/11. I've seen them take whole floors at Boston hotels while here for treatment at any one of our fine hospitals, but not so much anymore. They now go to European hospitals. The weirdest thing about them is that they would tell us they stay on Saudi time while they are here, so their handlers would have us at the hotel at 9AM every morning, but they would not come down til 3 or 4 in the afternoon. And of course there always was that fat envelope when they left!

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They made bail (surprised?) and so arraignment was held off until tomorrow in Boston Municipal Court.

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The Herald, natch, has more details including the fact that boys didn't rent a room at the Ritz - because two of them live there.

One of them IDed himself to police as Abdul Alathim, 21. City assessing records show Unit 21E, owned by Abdullah Abdulaziz Alothaim, is assessed at $3.07 million, although he only paid three Saudi relatives $100 for the property back in July, according to the Registry of Deeds. For that amount, he got a 3,246-square-foot unit with just one bedroom, but four bathrooms and two parking spaces.

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before the racial slurs started flying! Oh, Boston Herald, why are you the gift that keeps on giving?

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Nothing will happen to them, either here or back home. Their relatives back home will all have a big laugh at how they managed to use their "get out of jail free" cards.

The problem is that these brats and their piggish behavior infringe upon the rights of their neighbors to live in an environment free from loud parties at 3am. These brats do not have to get up and go to work like the rest of us do, and they think their money entitles them to do whatever they want to do, no matter the consequences.

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"they think their money entitles them to do whatever they want to do, no matter the consequences"

But it does. That's the real problem - it does.

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