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Andrew Square watering hole to dry up so that yet another Seaport restaurant can open

The Seaport continues to spin like a vortex, sucking out liquor licenses from the rest of the city: On March 27, the Boston Licensing Board holds a hearing on a proposal by chef Todd Winer (late of Met Back Bay) to buy the liquor license from Aces High in Andrew Square for his impending Pastoral at 345 Congress St.

Zagat reports Pastoral will be focused around a wood-burning oven and will feature "Neapolitan pizza and dishes made with new, locally sourced ingredients."

For some reason, Zagat has no listing for Aces High, but one reviewer at another site says, "This is where the teachers who ain't scared of nobody come to drink after hours."

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Comments

It is so true, the local 'hoods are being deprived. There needs to be geographic considerations along with the granting of many more licenses, and an end to this pay to play situation. Sorry for all those who have spent exorbitant amounts on the latest wave of licenses, but it's getting ridiculous (although typical Boston), and we need much more expansive licensing of these places.

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So it's not going to happen anytime soon.

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We either keep the fiefdoms, or we solve the social problems while greatly boosting the local economy. We need to start saying yes more; liquor licenses, allowing stores to go in over NIMBYisms, fixing the cap/medallion issue, late night public transit options, ect.

Rising tides tend to make everyone better off, and Boston needs to realize that the small minority and a old way of doing things are greatly reducing growth and prosperity for even those with a stranglehold on profitability right now.

Greater risk, greater reward, but it's the risk those power brokers are worried about. They don't have to deal with that in this climate, and the greater chance they can't control everything.

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How many new brick oven pizza joints does Boston need?

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quite a few more in the BackBay. There's a lack of places to grab a (good) pie down there.

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Are you implying they shouldn't be allowed to open because Boston doesn't "need" any more pizza places? Can you name 2 NEW brick oven pizza places that have opened in downtown Boston in the last 3 years?

Regardless, the market will dictate whether there is a need. If this places opens and there isn't enough brick-oven pizza business to go around, then it either it will close, or one of its competitors will close. That's what happens in a free market. If you open one bar more than a community "needs", then one will close. It's the beauty of supply/demand. Unfortunately, in Boston the government tries to limit supply (of liquor licenses) which causes problems like you have here (the absurd price of liquor license). How long would Aces High have to stay open to make the $300k+ they're going to get for their license? Frankly, I'm somewhat surprised most local corner bars don't just sell their license and get out of the biz all together.

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talking to the dude above me. I agree that we need MORE, especially Downtown, back Bay, and the South End.

Southie has plenty, both great and terrible local kinds. DTX, go check out Rico's on Bromfield, they make a good pie.

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Sure, there are a lot of pizza places, but this is more of a bar/sitdown-type place. Think Picco in the south end, or Figs.

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