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Menino funeral procession will pass several sites in city

Around 10:45 a.m. on Monday, a hearse carrying Tom Menino's body will leave Faneuil Hall for a private mass at noon at Most Precious Blood Church in Hyde Park.

The procession will pass in front of several spots in the city that were important to Menino, including Fenway Park, Dudley Square, where he started the renovation of the Ferdinand Building, Grove Hall, to which he helped bring a supermarket, Bowdoin/Geneva, where he always gave out toys at Christmas time, Franklin Park, the Mattapan branch library and Roslindale Square, which he helped revitalize.

Meanwhile, City Hall will be open until 6 p.m. today and while his body lies in state at Faneuil Hall tomorrow for people who want to drop off flowers or other memorials.

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Any Idea if it will be business as usual on Monday with licensing hearings?

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But I would hope so. He wasn't the current mayor and it was a sad, but not unanticipated event.

The lying in state thing seems really odd to me, but if people really want to look at his dead body, that's their business.

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but you sound like an asshole.

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Uranus.

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So is the name of the church that he's headed for.

Local and traditional? Definitely.

But it isn't my tradition nor my church, so I don't care if others feel these things are important so long as I'm not being forced to go look or worship.

Meanwhile, the passing of a person who was mayor for that long a time merits such rituals, even if they disrupt business as usual in the city a bit.

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Agreed. I'm Irish Catholic so I'm used to wakes and unique church names (but Most Precious Blood church has always stood out to me as a particularly creepy parish name). Lying in state isn't all that unusual for certain public figures, and not unusual at all for many local Catholics. Personally, I'd prefer the Jewish traditional approach of burying the dead quickly and then sitting shivah (without the deceased), but i think Pope Francis has enough on his reform plate at the moment.

I think we can all survive the minor inconveniences associated with paying tribute to the longest serving Mayor in the City's history. Plus, most of these events are taking place between the morning and afternoon rush hours rather than during them. It would seem that those planning these events have already taken some efforts to work around the schedules of the majority of us while respecting the wishes of the Menino family, and the Mayor himself who apparently helped with the planning before his death.

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Locals call it MPB. And if you go way back, it's the parish that gave us the politically incorrectly named drum and bugle corps called the Boston Crusaders, or BAC (Best American Corp) or simply Boston. The Crusaders are still extant today, although they broke off from MPB years ago.

A place that gave us both Menino and the Crusaders can call itself anything that it wants to, as far as I'm concerned.

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Wow, had no idea the Crusaders were once associated with MPB. Makes sense, as most Corps back in the day seemed to sprout from catholic parishes....
/former drum corp groupie

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came from Hyde Park and they all went to MPB. As a kid, I attended funerals and mass there many times and always thought it was a cool name.

Maybe one of the reasons I became a nurse.

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I am not Catholic and, while admiring much of Catholic ritual, am too much a democrat and republican (all lower case) to be able to join an institution that is based on extreme hierarchy. But that does not prevent me from admiring the poetry and intense piety of names such as Sacred Blood and Sacred Heart. The image of a heart opened by hands always struck me as especially powerful. Instead of focusing on the gore I see the symbolism of an individual sacrificing himself for another (which is I think how it should be read). I don't have to believe the literal aspect to appreciate the meaning.

I remember seeing what I thought was a Catholic elementary school in Dorchester, not far from the Milton Line, that had as its sign the symbol of the heart. Was it called Sacred Heart? Or have I just seen too many movies featuring Catholic priests?

On the other hand we have plenty of entertainment that that would make a name like Most Precious Blood sound anodyne.

Which is creepier?

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St. Gregory Church is right past the Milton line.

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"Creepy, perhaps. So is the name of the church that he's headed for."

I don't consider the name creepy at all. Then again, I've been around Catholics and Catholic Churches my whole life. That's the way it's been for many native Bostonians.

I don't know how to consider your statement : silly, ignorant, insulting to Catholics,...maybe all three.

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I've been around Catholics and Catholic churches my whole life, too โ€” including 12 years of school, where I won a special award at graduation for being the holiest kid, or something. But I've also lived around non-Catholics, so it doesn't surprise me that they find "Precious Blood" a creepy name. Too many Catholics never stop to think about how their religion looks or sounds to others. So, if you try to view your religion from an outsider's perspective โ€” say, as an anthropologist studying a distant culture โ€” you'll discover that Catholicism has elements that are fascinating, mysterious, far-fetched, medieval, and... bizarre. It's hard for non-Catholics to understand us, and no wonder. I'm not insulted, and I don't consider the remarks here silly or ignorant. Just normal for non-Catholics.

Bodily fluids are not central themes in most other religions. Most houses of worship are not named after bodily fluids (despite every sperm being sacred). Pope Francis is encouraging us to respect others' beliefs while helping others to understand ours. So this "creepy" discussion presents an educational opportunity. Since you've been around Catholics and churches your whole life, I hope you will do the honors of explaining. Because when I thought about how I'd approach it... Last Supper, Crucifixion, consecration, transubstantiation... everything I came up with did not make it seem any less mysterious or creepy. Good luck.

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At one point, there was some movement in the Catholic Church about the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, probably about the shedding of His blood helped the rest of us. So, when there was a need for the name of a parish, someone thought it was a good idea.

I have a very Catholic friend who thinks dedicating parishes to concepts as opposed to saints in wrong. To be fair, they were in St. Paul's Dorchester, which was renamed Holy Family after merging with St. Kevin's. I, of course, pointed out that I was proud to be a part of Sacred Heart. Of course, that was false modesty, since I really had never studied the Sacred Heart of Jesus movement. In hindsight, the whole Sacred Heart thing is pretty cool.

Of course, this is about the believers. If you are a nonbeliever then yes, these names are odd, but when the concept is explained, perhaps not so much.

And no, I can only vaguely think about what MPB is all about.

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For this is my blood, the blood of the new and everlasting covenant. It will be shed for you and for all men so that sins may be forgiven. Do this in memory of me.

(for non-Catholics - that is a standard prayer as part of every mass - I have hardly been to church in 25 years - and once I started reciting it, it came back to me like an old song verse).

The Precious Blood of Christ is a central concept to the sacrament of Communion (think about the meaning of that word). In fact, when sacramental wine is shared, we believe that we are drinking actual blood through "transubstantiation" - a distinct difference from Protestant denominations who believe in "consubstantiation" which is a more symbolic belief that Jesus is present in the bread and wine - but do not believe that the sacramental offerings undergo a physical transformation (quite honestly, most Catholics - and probably even priests - would have a hard time buying this - but it's technically part of the catechism).

To a Catholic - it's an uncommon name for a church, but when we think about it, we get it. However, I can understand how it seems unusual.

Context is everything. But all - please be respectful. Somehow the Catholic church has become a bit of a pincushion and I recently hear things in VERY public forums that would be criticized roundly were they said about other religions. All of the primary faiths are quite old and each has its own quirks. They are a deep matter of faith to many people. You are welcome to question them, but please do not belittle them - no matter whose religion.

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Of course, I know the eucharistic prayer, but now I see where MPB fits in the overall theological part of the Church.

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Thank you, Stevil, for taking the time to recall the significance of Catholic imagery, ritual and faith. Despite the failings of the Vatican, its imposed morality and misguided internal governance, the spirituality of these symbols do ring true far above the shortcomings of the church leaders, as you point out.

Salvador Dali was a modernist who captured Catholic symbolism in his surrealism. Check it out, intellectuals!

Amidst the cool, clever, often bitter sarcasm of the Universal Hub usual suspects, the tenets of the Catholic faith have been deemed laughable and outright creepy. So be it.

Respect goes a long way, friends. Body and Blood of Christ.

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A church with a name one would more likely associate with a vampire movie is not something that you find in many places.

I don't worship there and it doesn't affect me, so, whatever.

You would probably be the first to complain if the Mormons built a temple in your neighborhood, though.

I think you need to get out of Boston more - you might get more perspective, and less reactionary tribal impulse.

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"A church with a name one would more likely associate with a vampire movie is not something that you find in many places. "

HE needs to get out more?
Here are some scooped from a partial list from the first page of Google results, up until the point I got sick of looking:
Boston, MA
Dover, MA
West Collingswood, NJ
Hazleton, PA
Glidden, WI
Detroit, MI
New London, WI
Corpus Christi, TX
Chula Vista, CA
Oviedo, FL
Cincinnatti, OH
Kansas City, MO
Angola, NY
Long Island, NY
Brooklyn, NY
Tulsa, OK
Walden, NY
London, UK

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Too many locations to post, even though it isn't common.

No major cathedrals are in that set, and it is not very many instances for a very large denomination.

Sacred Heart and all its variations and translations, on the other hand, are very popular.

Note that there are Catholics commenting that MPB isn't exactly common as an appellation among Catholic churches, either.

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We called it St Buffy's when the adults weren't around. Used to scare the little ones that there were vampires at night looking for all the blood.

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Mother's side were Polish Catholics. Dad's side were Danish Baptists. I remember Dad's side of the family showing up for all the Polack wakes, Strong, Stern, Respectful, in contrast with the wailing and all but making out with the body that the other side were doing.

At my Polish Grandma's wake, my Dad and Godmother said, "don't touch the body if you don't want to. We don't. If they call you a cold b#!$%, just tell them that it's the Viking Blood in you."

At Grandpa's wake, we actually joked about, among other things, what is now known as the "Polish Kiss of Death."

***

This said, I'm trying to decide what to do tomorrow. Do I want to go see the "leftovers" of Hizzonah at Faneuil Hall, or should I just send a condolence card and a few dollars to the Menino Fund?

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Log out and back into the Herald comments section.

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Litaniae pretiosissimi Sanguinis Domini Nostri Iesu Christi
Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ
The text of this Litany in honor of Jesus in His Most Precious Blood was drawn up by the Sacred Congregation of Rites and promulgated by Pope John XXIII on February 24, 1960. The form of the Litany is actually older, for similar texts can be found in early 20th century prayer books1. The devotion to Jesus specifically in His most Precious Blood was first popularized by St. Gaspar del Bufalo (1786-1837, feast Dec. 28) who founded the Missioners of the Most Precious Blood. A partial indulgence is granted to the faithful who recite this litany, which is approved for either private or public use.
Kyrie, eleison
R. Christe, eleison. Lord, have mercy
R. Christ, have mercy.
Kyrie, eleison
Christe, audi nos
R. Christe, audi nos. Lord, have mercy.
Christ, hear us.
R. Christ, graciously hear us.
Pater de caelis, Deus,
R. miserere nobis. God the Father of Heaven,
R. have mercy on us.
Fili, Redemptor mundi, Deus,
R. miserere nobis. God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
R. have mercy on us.
Spiritus Sancte, Deus,
R. miserere nobis. God, the Holy Spirit,
R. have mercy on us.
Sancta Trinitas, unus Deus,
R. miserere nobis. Holy Trinity, One God,
R. have mercy on us.
Sanguis Christi, Unigeniti Patris aeterni,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, only-begotten Son of the eternal Father,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, Verbi Dei incarnati,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, Incarnate Word of God,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, Novi et Aeterni Testamenti,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, of the New and Eternal Testament,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in agonia decurrens in terram,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, falling upon the earth in Agony,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in flagellatione profluens,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, shed profusely in the Scourging,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in coronatione spinarum emanans,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, flowing forth in the Crowning with Thorns,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in Cruce effusus,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, poured out on the Cross,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, pretium nostrae salutis,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, price of our salvation,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, sine quo non fit remissio,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, without which there is no forgiveness,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in Eucharistia potus et lavacrum animarum,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, Eucharistic drink and refreshment of souls,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, flumen misericordiae,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, stream of mercy,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, victor daemonum,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, victor over demons,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, fortitudo martyrum,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, courage of Martyrs,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, virtus confessorum,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, strength of Confessors,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, germinans virgines,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, bringing forth Virgins,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, robur periclitantium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, help of those in peril,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, levamen laborantium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, relief of the burdened,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, in fletu solatium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, solace in sorrow,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, spes paenitentium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, hope of the penitent,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, solamen morientium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, consolation of the dying,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, pax et dulcedo cordium,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, peace and tenderness of hearts,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, pignus vitae aeternae,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, pledge of eternal life,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, animas liberans de lacu Purgatorii,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, freeing souls from purgatory,
R. save us.
Sanguis Christi, omni gloria et honore dignissimus,
R. salva nos. Blood of Christ, most worthy of all glory and honor,
R. save us.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi,
R. parce nobis, Domine. Lamb of God, who taketh away the sins of the world,
R. spare us, O Lord.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi,
R. exaudi nos, Domine. Lamb of God, who taketh away the sins of the world,
R. graciously hear us, O Lord.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi,
R. miserere nobis, Domine. Lamb of God, who taketh away the sins of the world,
R. have mercy on us, O Lord.
V. Redemisti nos, Domine, in sanguine tuo.
R. Et fecisti nos Deo nostro regnum. V. Thou hast redeemed us, O Lord, in Thy Blood.
R. And made us, for our God, a kingdom.
Oremus;
Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui unigenitum Filium tuum mundi Redemptorem constituisti, ac eius sanguine placari voluisti: concede, quaesumus, salutis nostrae pretium ita venerari, atque a praesentis vitae malis eius virtute defendi in terris, ut fructu perpetuo laetemur in caelis. Per eundem Christum Dominum nostrum. R. Amen. Let us pray;
Almighty and eternal God, Thou hast appointed Thine only-begotten Son the Redeemer of the world and willed to be appeased by his blood. Grant, we beg of Thee, that we may worthily adore this price of our salvation and through its power be safeguarded from the evils of the present life so that we may rejoice in its fruits forever in heaven. Through the same Christ our Lord. R. Amen.

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which does not mean an open casket for viewing the body. Many officials Lie in Repose in a closed coffin. If I remember correctly; Joe Moakley was an open casket and Governor Celucci was a closed casket. Both of whom were in the State House Great Hall.

This is essentially a wake (with an honor guard) for the Mayor with a very large attendance list.

Lying in State usually refers to being viewed in the Capitol Rotunda. A privilege granted to few, usually a President or Senator In the US, we seem to have gotten away from the traditional definition.

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Here is a small fraction of what Menino accomplished in this City.

Http://www.cityofboston.gov/news/default.aspx?id=5023

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is here.

via Reddit

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Procession runs behind his adopted parish, St. John Chrysostom.

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I wonder why he switched to St. John's, given that St. Ann's was practically a neighbor?

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As I understand it, St. John's has long been the "parish of choice" for many who live in another parish, whether in the city or in some suburbs.

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St. John's is a great parish - wonderful, welcoming priests - Father Charlie, Father Connolly, and Sister Maureen. It's a very happy church. When you go to Mass there, you leave happy.

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Father Mantle would be glad to hear that !

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