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Roslindale man charged up over the labels on Duracell batteries, so he sues

Duracell Copper Top Battery commercial 1982

A Roslindale man and a Reading woman are suing Proctor and Gamble and Gillette over the risk that their Duracell batteries might leak some time over the next ten years.

Jamal Yusuf and Lauren Carlson are seeking to become lead plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit for more than $5 million in alleged damages over the fact that labels on packages of "Copper Top" batteries with "Duralock" have a 10-guarantee - but also a warning that the batteries might leak.

Yusuf and Carlson do not allege in their lawsuit that their batteries actually did leak, but they are positive they were harmed by labeling that says they might leak in regular use, which negatively affects the whole idea of a 10-year warranty.

As with a series of other recent labeling lawsuits, this one was brought by Mirabella Law in the Back Bay, under both federal and state consumer-protection laws. In all the cases, the potential class is Massachusetts residents who bought a particular product, in this case, Duracell batteries.

Proctor and Gamble got into the battery business when it bought Gillette, which got into the battery business when it bought Duracell.

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Comments

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though I doubt that this silly lawsuit is the reason.

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because some idiot 1980s MBA graduate was repeatedly told by their instructors that the best way to raise a company's stock price by half a point is to sell off profitable divisions.

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batteries with the intent of not using them for several years? Oh wait, the same sort of idiots that see no problem with tying up our court system with frivolous lawsuits in the unrealistic expectation they will somehow receive an underserved big cash lottery payout.

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in anticipation of power outages. But I typically buy them shortly before the storm season and use them within a year or two of purchase (if not sooner), even if there isn't a power outage. Most people I know do the same thing, and don't say - well the package says that the batteries will last ten years, so I'll buy a ten year supply now.

In the rare instances I've had battery leakage in devices, it was usually a backup radio I neglected to check for awhile (lesson learned) and the batteries had completely run down. Never ever heard of leakage while the batteries are still in the package, unless the package was subjected to extreme heat.

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Opening an old flashlight meant dealing with old leaky batteries.

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leaked batteries usually meant destroyed toys. Which never made my Dad happy.

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