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Alleged Georgia gang member wanted for three murders arrested at downtown homeless shelter

Boston Police report its officers and US marshals this morning arrested a man wanted for three murders in Georgia at the St. Francis House on Boylston Street.

Daniel Pena, 22, an alleged leader of the Gangster Disciples gang, is charged with three murders in July. In September, Pena and eight other alleged members of the gang's Hate Committee - in charge of enforcing gang codes - were indicted on 45 counts, including murder and aggravated assault. Others were rounded up, but Pena escaped arrest.

Boston Police say Pena was arrested without incident around 8:10 a.m.

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Comments

Sinners and Saints, unfortunately murderers,sex offenders and thieves often find refuge in the shelters and bully the most needy of our society

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or some of the biggest welfare benefits in the country.

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{citation needed}

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or some of the biggest welfare benefits in the country.

The biggest welfare benefit is prison where the state covers 100% of all costs for the duration of the resident's stay. And here I am working like a sucker while these guys eat in a restaurant 3 times a day!

According to Wikipedia, MA is #22 for per capita incarceration. NY spends far more per inmate so these guys really should have gone to Manhattan instead for top-notch benefits.

EDIT: Looks like MA isn't the highest in terms of prison spending per inmate but is in the top-10. So if you're planning on going to jail anyway MA perhaps isn't the worst state to plan your relocation. What these guys from Georgia might have forgotten is that you do the time in the state you did the crime so they won't have long to enjoy the Commonwealth's hospitality.

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Do a year in Walpole, and tell me that's "welfare". Better yet, spend two weeks in the hole and tell me *that's* "welfare".

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Not true. If you ever talk to the folks who sell spare change news, for example, they've all spent time in shelters and gotten out as quickly as possible, usually with the help of a benefits check and teaming up with a roommate to afford a cheap place out in Revere or something like that.

The people in the shelters, if they are not there temporarily following some catastrophic incident, are people who cannot get it together even to file for benefits in many cases, due to drugs, mental illness, lack of education, etc.

There are a whole lot of people making it work somehow, albeit just barely, on a 900 dollar disability check and a couple hundred a month in food stamps. If you think this is too much assistance to pay for someone who might be a little older, somewhat disabled due to poor health or a physical injury or unlucky circumstances in life, then I invite you to imagine the shelter downtown with 20 times the folks crowded around outside of it.

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Why don't the shelters fingerprint patrons at intake to verify their identities and flag anyone that is dangerous with warrants? It's a huge safety issue for the staff and other users of the shelters.

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Seriously.

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It would infringe upon a persons Civil Liberties and right to privacy. And it would discourage law-abiding guests from using shelter services. You can't treat poor people as though they're criminals.

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St. Francis Shelter is a private endeavour run by the area's largest human services provider.

But yes, they will probably not fingerprint because of their odd idea that someone wants them to shelter the homeless (as long as they don't cause trouble in the shelter.)

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Felicity have you ever walked by this shelter? It is like running the gauntlet of crack/meth/booze- heads both in front and directly across the street. They go across the street to buy and do their dope before they go in or after they come out it is a mess. Lots if needy homeless wont go in because they dont want their stuff stolen. So if there are violent offenders among them I'm sure the non- violent men and women who use these shelters wouldn't mind if the violent ones were removed.
Shit - Bank of America wants multiple IDs and your fingerprint to cash a check - if you want free housing and food it seems a reasonable request.

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I went to Emerson, and my friends and I would never walk by the shelter, even though it was only a block from our dorm, because of the intense, constant harassment we faced from "residents" every time we walk by.

Now, 15 years later, I get a lot of donation requests from St. Francis House in the mail. They all go in the trash.

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Violence, crime, robbery. etc., discourage many homeless from using shelters. And if they did manage to do a more thorough identification and background check, you can be sure people like Felicity would complain and protest that it is was a violation of civil liberties and human rights.

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If you go into a BOA with a note politely requesting money you'll be given free food and housing for many years, no questions asked. Safer then the shelters too.

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See pretty frequent reports of homicides in prison. Don't think I've ever seen one for a shelter. Not to mention other acts by both inmates and staff.

I take it you haven't been in either before. I have. The prison populations are caged for a reason.

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I had dinner once with a minister who ran a big soup kitchen. He said, "I make sandwiches for people who are hungry. I'm not under the delusion that these people are all nice, or even that I could safely turn my back on some of them without fear of getting stabbed." He shrugged. "I make sandwiches for people who need them."

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who provided meals to prostitutes (big Marine base nearby)...he said, "I just feed 'em, I don't judge 'em".

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Please explain how it would discourage law abiding guests? I am so very eager to hear...

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Homeless shelters are going to have access to some national database of fingerprints? I'm not seeing this as something that could ever happen.

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Guessing THEY have access to "some national database of fingerprints".

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I'm betting you also think drug testing welfare recipients is a great idea, too.

Great idea for the drug testing companies. Not for the taxpayers. Something like a total of ten people out of 10 million tested? On that order of magnitude. Arizona found 4. Florida found 1?

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Wasn't there some sort of catch, like one had to consent to being tested before actually being tested in order for it to be legal? Assuming that's the case, I'm surprised they even found ten - I mean, what kind of an idiot would agree to being tested if they in fact use drugs?

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Why don't the shelters fingerprint patrons at intake to verify their identities and flag anyone that is dangerous with warrants?

For the same reason the Ritz Carlton doesn't do it.

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