Hey, there! Log in / Register

New developer unveils plans for replacing the old Anthony's Pier 4

The Boston Business Journal reports on Tishman Speyer's new look for the proposed office and residential buildings it wants to put on Pier 4. The actual old Anthony's building will be replaced with a park. The company purchased the property from another developer, who had BRA approval for its own plans, last December.

Neighborhoods: 

Ad:
Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

wow, its been scaled back from 383 units to 100? Just more low slung boring buildings in the squidport that more and more looks like you are in an office park in Houston.

up
Voting closed 0

It's not like there's a massive housing shortage in Boston or a red hot residential market or anything.

Cripes! Why the reduction in the number of units?

up
Voting closed 0

would you rather these new buildings look like? Seriously, I actually want to know.

up
Voting closed 0

I really like the early industrial look of lots of brick, big windows, and some skilled masonry work. You know, like they used to make.

Less modular plastic-looking garbage with faux-brick panelling. I realize that in these here times, that's what we're stuck with, though.

up
Voting closed 0

for the insight. People often criticize new design plans, but rarely offer up an alternative.

Personally, I would love to see new brick row houses constructed in residential neighborhoods, but understand that the cost is too prohibitive, and would only increase the price of new housing units.

up
Voting closed 0

I wonder if going to the neighborhood meetings with the brick rowhouses already existing in these areas would get them through those and the BRA process faster, though, saving some overhead. It's undeniable that a good chunk of development costs are the ridiculous back-and-forths that happen all through the design phases.

up
Voting closed 0

So basically you're upset that a new neighborhood, with height restrictions due to the airport, looks like a new neighborhood with height restrictions?

up
Voting closed 0

Gotta love that two level below ground parking! Hope there is some protection from storm surges.

up
Voting closed 0

Boston already has waterfront parking garages (there's one at Rowes Wharf, at least one in the North End), so I suspect somebody's figured out how to make them reasonably waterproof.

up
Voting closed 0

In fact, the first floor of this building should be non-critical/expendable, given expected surge potential over the next half century.

The assumption is that people will just move their cars ahead of the storm - like they did in NYC (or, in reality, didn't despite rather prognostic surge zone maps). Or that they will just get their insurance to pay for it. There is no "waterproofing" or anything like that. In fact, some builders consider this to be surge storage - takes up some of the surge as it heads inland.

up
Voting closed 0

While waiting for a train at South Station, I got to thinking about how vulnerable the T is to storm surge damage. It seems as if the Red Line beginning as South Station could flood from Andrew to Park. Based on NYC's experience that could shut down that part of the system for years.... or maybe forever. Given all the subway entrances/exits, emergency stars, and ventilation needs I don't know if flooding could be prevented. Perhaps, some large pumps could be installed in the tunnels as protection.

up
Voting closed 0

Those pumps already exist. Whether they'll work when needed most is anyone's guess.

up
Voting closed 0