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Officer remains hospitalized as suspect is sent to Bridgewater for evaluation

A Boston police officer suffered a possible concussion and a large laceration trying to arrest Carlos Agrinsoni for allegedly exposing himself, a Suffolk County prosecutor said today.

A Dorchester Municipal Court judge today ordered Agrinsoni to Bridgewater for evaluation after a court psychologist testified he seemed unable to understand why he was in court and that he has had problems since suffering a serious brain injury when he was 17.

According to prosecutors, Agrinsoni, who has a long record of exposing himself and assault and battery, was exposing himself on Blue Hill Avenue last night when officers arrived.

Agrinsoni allegedly exposed himself to officers, said "I just want to go home" and started running.

Officers caught up with him at 70 Tennis Rd. When Officer Henry Doherty told him to sit down, an assistant DA said, Agrinsoni began to struggle, knocking Doherty in the face and opening a gash on his forehead.

He then ran away and jumped into a basement window at 85 Tennis, where he was arrested.

Innocent, etc.


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Comments

And he was walking the streets why?

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Not a prison. (although we have them)

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... that we have too many prisons, eating too many resources that could be used for things like mental health care.

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Who would you have the prisons set free or not incarcerate? The rapist? The person terrorizing their neighborhoods with firearms or doing robberies? The guy breaking into people's houses? I know it goes against your narrative but Massachusetts prisons do not confine people for having a bag of weed on them. To get indicted, stand trial and get sentenced to state prison means that you have committed a pretty serious crime, or have a lengthy criminal record with serious violent offenses.

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mental health centers.

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Because many people have fallen through the gaping holes in the social safety net and he sounds like he may be one of them.

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Another example of our mental healthcare system failure, as if more is needed. Mr. Agrinsoni has probably been engaging in similar behavior for years, and apparently is known to police and the courts. But no doubt, their hands are tied due to out-dated laws regarding mentally ill people. I realize there were serious abuses in psychiatric hospitals prior to the ACLU 1975 ruling saying mentally ill people can't be forced to take meds, and committing people. But, The System is not working. Today, prisons, jails, and homeless shelters are holding pens for the seriously mentally ill. Or, they are living 'in the community' receiving out-patient care (if that, and assuming they take their anti-psychotic meds). I feel for the cops and others on the front lines who have to deal with this mess.

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the situation is getting crucial. Our putative ISIS volunteer from Adams by way of a BPD Captain's family is another example. When Dukakis was taking bows for closing Dickensian state hospitals and for the "Massachusetts Miracle", he didn't account for economic cycles and the funding requirements that don't go away. Another example of people seeing things as they wish they were rather than as they are.

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Excessive use of the criminal justice system and prisons has sucked away so many of the resources which could be used for more appropriate approaches to public health issues, such as addiction and mental illness.

In the US, we just declare war on all of it, criminalize it, and lock it up in prisons rather than deal with certain types of people as human beings with rights in a productive manner.

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No one appears to have declared war on this person, criminalized his actions, or locked him up in a prison. It's great that you say all this stuff, and wonderful if you mean it, but you can't expect us to believe any of it when we actually look at the facts as reported.

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The war on drugs and the massive scale corporatized imprisonment explosion have sucked out the resources that should be used to treat such people.

We have a lot of money for prisons, but none for prevention and treatment. Total for-profit scam.

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I'm waiting for you to respond to my earlier comment swirly. Who would you release from the prisons?

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Actually, nobody who has not been convicted of a violent crime should be serving more than a few years.

Also, I would require screening for and treatment of mental illness of those in prison, using the proper diagnostic criteria and not the "legally insane" criteria. Countless articles chronicle the reality that the prison population is rife with mental illness issues that are not treated appropriately.

That mental illness population also overlaps the population of people with drug and alcohol dependencies that are not appropriately seen to in prison populations, too.

People with serious mental retardation should also be released and treated accordingly. People with learning disabilities - another seriously enriched population - should also be appropriately taught life skills and basic abilities.

For profit prisons should be banned. Period. That's a huge root of the "send them all to prison and criminalize everything" world that starts with the well-documented school-to-prison pipeline.

To summarize: learning disabilities, addiction, mental illness require a public health approach. Period. These people end up in prison populations because "law and order" approaches simply do not work. We know that. Now we need to act on that.

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Those serving state prison sentences are those that have been indicted, found guilty by a jury and sentenced by a judge. Would you release the rapist or person serving their second or third sentence for a firearm? Or the serial armed robber? As I stated earlier there are no Massachusetts state prisoners serving time solely for possession of drugs. I don't consider Massachusetts state prisons corporate run institutions, but you can keep repeating your false narrative if it makes you feel better.

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Joshua Komisarjevsky

David Laffer (Long Island Drug Store murders)

Both guys were considered non-violent offenders.

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But no doubt, their hands are tied due to out-dated laws regarding mentally ill people.

There is only so much anyone can do, legally. And I can't believe there is $$ available in the state coffers for mental health care and furthermore, the State likely doesn't want the liability of having so many become 'wards of the State'.

It's a legal and logistical nightmare. And let's not forget the closing of the Long Island Shelter which provided needed mental health services to the guests. Does anyone know if these were reestablished anywhere else?

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I wonder if this is the guy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OY27tTT1qS4

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The guy in court seemed younger, lighter skinned and not as beefy.

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