What's a bird gotta do to get some privacy in this town?

Heron at the Watertown Dam

In addition to the usual ducks and geese, a heron patrolled the water just beneath the Watertown Dam today. Mostly, he quietly stood on some rocks under some brush on one side of the dam. He did take one leisurely stroll from his post to the other side of the river, attracting the eye of little kids and a couple of photographers, but finding no fish and seemingly getting annoyed by all the attention, retreated to his semi-hidden spot.

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He (or she) has been in that spot every day

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for at least the past week. There are frequently GBH along that stretch of the Charles, but seldom are they as non-skittish as this specimen. It's probably the closest look you'll ever get to one in the wild.

That spot along the damn has also been good for Black-crowned Night Heron in the earlier part of the summer, but they seem to have retreated from daytime activity about two weeks ago.

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Late in the season

In the spring, they all seem to be a bit skittish, and will relocate if a small boat gets anywhere near them.

By fall, most will regard a passing kayak with little more than a brief glance.

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Local neighborhood heron

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We have one here in West Rox/ Dedham behind Mosley's. I've nicknamed it Caladonia, in honor of the former name of this area. Quite the beautiful creature!

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this town?

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Are we supposed to care about Watertown now? On Sunday there were two different GBH on Riverway and Fenway sections of the the Muddy River.

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And if I'd known ...

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I might have gone down and taken (or tried to take) a photo. But nobody told me, alas, so instead, after dropping the kidlet off at a competition at BU Saturday morning, I drove into Brighton to take a photo of the Pig 'N' Whistle, then just kept going ...

It's not like Watertown is so far outside the city that it's terra incognita.

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There are two main ways of

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There are two main ways of learning about birds in Boston - the e-bird reports and the Google Group. In both, the Muddy River between Charlesgate and Louis Pasteur Ave is prominently present. It may be the good transit, but I suspect its hybrid nature makes it more of a curiosity. You get the birds that wade in the sea water, those that fish in river water, and the beach, algae-foraging kind. So it seems it's a one-stop shop for the pros of the birdwatching game. My memory can only hold a few genera, so I stopped taking pictures of birds when I was in college and lived there. Now I take pictures of people taking pictures. I have a few tens of people with the GBHs. (GBHs are more noticeable than, say, flickers.) Agassiz Road and across the street from MFA are the hotspots.
You could say that, for privacy reasons, birds go to the LMA section. Phragmites are so big there, that they can hide.

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