Woman kidnapped in own car in Brookline, forced to get money out of ATM

Brookline Police report an out-of-town woman was getting into her car on Marion Street near Coolidge Corner around 9:15 p.m. yesterday when a man jumped in her car:

The male forced her to drive to a close by ATM and withdraw a sum of money. The victim then drove the subject to the lower Beacon Street area by Park Drive. The male subject got out. The victim then drove to her home, in another community.

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Seems a bit odd

Not that traumatized people don't do odd things at times, but it is strange to me that she went straight home. One would expect that she would have left the area and stopped to call the police, or driven to a police station?

If she didn't have a phone or it was stolen, that might explain it.

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My implication, is that

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My implication, is that CLEARLY the criminal is the one who terrorized the poor woman and made her drive around to the ATM and robbed her. Not the poor victim!! I was responding to Swirlycurl's comment before mine which hinted to blame the victim.

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Would you do this?

The criminal didn't make her drive home. She left the area, which would reduce the chance of finding the attacker.

Where do I blame the victim? I simply said that I found it odd that she took so much time to go to the police, and did so outside of the jurisdiction of the crime. That is possibly the result of trauma, but also possible that there is more to this story.

p.s. Matthew Stuart is a Black Man.

p.p.s. there's a junkie under your coffee table.

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If Matthew Stewart didn't exist

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people like you would have to invent him. He is statistically very atypical in a multitude of ways, not to mention there are plenty of every day examples of violent crime, but most wouldn't help forward your narrative.

Ut isn't necessarily to make everything racial. Maria made zero mention or insinuation of race, ethnicity, etc. Why do you feel the need to bring it up?

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Miss the point much?

One brother murders his wife, hands the gun to his brother to inflict a superficial wound, and then says "a black man" did it. The BPD took this at face value, launched an illegal house to house rampage, and found a convenient black man to vilify. Vilify to the point that he wasn't released even after smarter detectives took over and fingered the most likely suspect.

Wife murdering isn't statistically atypical, sadly. Wife murdering and blaming it on the bogeyman du jour isn't statistically atypical, either. Nor is auto insurance fraud, or faking a kidnapping for various reasons, etc.

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Unfamiliar things often seem odd

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Where do I blame the victim? I simply said that I found it odd that she took so much time to go to the police, and did so outside of the jurisdiction of the crime.

In the cold light of day, from a non-threatened perspective, it sure does seem odd. At night, already in an unfamiliar community, not knowing where the nearest cop shop is, who's to say it's in the least odd? Try to think back to a time when you were shocked or traumatized -- were all your actions perfectly rational and sensible? It's not really that much of a mind-stretcher to imagine the victim doing exactly what she did.

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It's still a good question

You're absolutely right. However, it's still a legitimate question to ask. We're not drawing any conclusions here, we're just asking ourselves a question.

I'm going to guess that a police detective does the same thing all the time. They ask questions, listen intently, gathering all the facts, all the time looking for inconsistencies and holes in an effort to be sure they have good info. Good info is the key to solving cases and bad info just leads you down the wrong path, ultimately wasting time.

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Yes, and I explained

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You: Not that traumatized people don't sometimes do strange things, but that sure is strange.
Me: Why yes, it is, but perhaps not so much given that she was 1)traumatized 2)in a strange city 3)at night.

Good now?

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What part of...

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"out of town woman" did you not understand? She wasn't from Brookline. Did you expect her to drive the streets after just being carjacked hoping to run into a police station? Jesus.

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It's a legitimate question

Are you serious?

Who is the criminal here?

Did you expect her to drive the streets after just being carjacked hoping to run into a police station? Jesus.

My implication, is that CLEARLY the criminal is the one who terrorized the poor woman and made her drive around to the ATM and robbed her.

Calm down folks, she's asking a legitimate question, and one that should be asked. She's not attacking the victim, just wondering about something that she thought was odd.

Tough crowd.

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Careful of taking this at face value

That's all I'm saying. It would be interesting to see if there are witnesses who didn't bother to call 911. Not completely impossible, but also unlikely.

What a bunch of Newman Flanagans we have here.

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From the report

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"Once home she texted her friend who contacted us. Officers made contact with the victim. The description we have at this time is a white male. This is an active investigation. The victim was not hurt."

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Even more bizarre

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Who gets carjacked, made to get money from an ATM, and then texts a friend about it rather than phone the police?

I get driving away, maybe even home. If you're traumatized, you go on a bit of auto-pilot until you feel you're safe. Jumping out and banging on doors looking for someone to call police after the guy gets out of your car puts you in the same place he is. But once you get home and want to reach out to someone, how is 911 not the first number you dial and not your buddy who then has to be the one to call the police for you? That's weird.

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When I was mugged (in DC,

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When I was mugged (in DC, where I lived at the time) years ago, I swore up and down to the kid pointing a gun at me that if he just walked away with my money and didn't hurt me, I wouldn't report him. I went straight home afterwards and it took a few calls to friends to finally get me to call the police. (and no, my delay didn't delay catching him. It's not like a kid with a gun was an unusual thing back then in DC, and the cops who did show up at my place, although very nice, essentially said they never catch them).

Point being, yes, nothing should be taken at face value, but also don't underestimate the effect a state of shock has on rational thinking.

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Another possibility

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Maybe the victim was illegal and afraid of deportation. Maybe she doesn't speak English. That could explain her reluctance to alert authorities and why the suspect description is so vague. Who knows. It's honestly none of our business to speculate why her behavior was what it was.

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It sure is our business

It's honestly none of our business to speculate why her behavior was what it was.

Huh?
When trying to determine the veracity of someone's story, it sure is our business. We're not judging anybody here, we're not coming to any conclusions, but we are asking questions. We're trying to explain what happened. That's all.

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