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Board affirms death sentences for two South Boston bars

Proposed 100 A Street building in South Boston

The new 100 A St.

The Zoning Board of Appeals this week approved the replacement of Williams Tavern, 100 A St. and the Stadium Sports Bar, 232 Old Colony Ave., with the sort of fancy new housing that is rapidly taking over the neighborhood.

Williams Tavern and the adjoining My Diner will make way for a six-story, nine-unit condo building. At a board hearing on Tuesday, developer Michael Moor's attorney, David Murray, said they will be talking to the diner's owners about moving into the first-floor commercial space, although he said it looks like they might move elsewhere in the neighborhood.

The building will have room for 10 cars, with leased spaces for another 8 cars in a nearby garage.

The board also approved plans by developers Kris Meola and Ryan Sillery to tear down the shuttered Stadium to

  1. make way for a building with 24 residential units

and 29 parking spaces.

Also Tuesday, the board approved a developer's plan to replace a single-family house at 37 Mercer St. with a three-story, six-unit building with a 6-car garage.

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Comments

Thank god! I live in this area and am sick of finding needles around Stadium. Which closed, by the way, after a shooting occurred outside its windows. Progress!!

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29 spots for 24 units?

24 units nowadays requires a minimum of 40 spaces. Good luck with parking. An almost impossible task now just got harder. There will now be on a daily basis a dozen or so more cars looking for parking in that area.

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24 units near the T should only need about 18 spaces.

Otherwise, why are you more entitled to free public parking than anybody else who lives in the area and pays taxes?

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Apparently, you know nothing about South Boston . Average is 2 cars a unit. We experience the parking nightmare on the other end. It's terrible.

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When I drive to work I PAY good money to store my large piece of personal property in South Boston for the day.The price of that daily rental of space for my private possession has risen about 40% in three years, but that's because I am taking advantage of a scarce resource. I don't think that that is unreasonable.

But, hey, you can always pay for parking or get rid of your car and use the T if not being allowed to take over and control your own special bit of publicly-owned urban asphalt for your sole private use bothers you so. You just have to learn to share with people who have the EXACT same rights to that public property as you do. You don't own the street, and you never did. You don't get to demand that others pay for what you get for free because you feel special. Pretty simple.

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You basically proved Kimberly's point, which is that there is demand for parking in Southie. Kimberly is asking for the private sector to handle this, just like property owners on Commonwealth Flats have.

I don't live in the neighborhood and barely visit there, but I do know that South Boston's parking situation is almost at the level of the South End, and at this rate residents could be facing Beacon Hill levels of frustration in a decade.

We can encourage people to take public transit (ignoring that without investments, we will be encouraging overcrowding of public transit) but if people either need or want to drive, not dealing with parking is burying your head in Carson Beach.

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but not based in reality. I live in a 7 unit building with 8 off street parking spots. There are 13 cars for our building. We are actually closer to Andrew T than the staduim building. Hopefully people use the T more, but the fact is if it is a hassle for someone to not have a car, and they can afford the time or money to avoid that hassle, they are going to do that 99% of the time. I honestly don't think parking is terrible around here, even after 8pm on a weeknight I can find a spot within a couple blocks. Weekends are a breeze. Having an off street spot doesn't make me an asshole for also using on street parking that, like you pointed out, I also pay for and have the same rights to as everyone else.

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If you live a mile from downtown, why have a car?

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If you live a mile from downtown, why have a car?

Maybe they never go downtown?

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Live near downtown, but my job is now in the burbs. Had a couple of great jobs downtown. Taking the T to one of them was pretty good, and walking to the other was even better. But then things changed and I got a different job, in the burbs. So now I drive to work.

I guess I could move, but we're talking a $500,000 decision, plus +/- 6 months of my life devoted to a house-hunt and move, and I don't really want to move. So I live a mile from down-town, but own a car to drive to work.

Does that make me a terrible person?

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In fact, commuting out from the city to a job in the 'burbs, as backasswards as it may seem, is actually more sensible than commuting from the suburbs into the city (the latter is what most people do.), because one is going against the rush-hour traffic, as opposed to with it.

I commuted to a piano tuning job down in Providence, RI, from Somerville at least a couple times per week for a long time, so I know. The volume going out of the city during the morning rush hour, and coming back into the city during the evening rush-hour was still heavy, but at least it moved along pretty smoothly.

I'd watch everybody coming into the city during the morning rush-hour, and the northbound side of the Southeast Expressway looked like a damned parking lot. The same could be said for the southbound side of the Expressway when I was coming back into the city during the evening rush-hours.

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Another ugly luxury condo building.

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I hope my diner finds a new home. That place is great. Don't want to see them go.

on a random note - anyone know if anything is going into the old bordered up Chinese restaurant at west boradway off D street. I live right there and kinda looks like crap - been vacant for a few few years.

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What is bordered up? Like the Great Wall of Mexico?

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The only way we're going to solve the housing crisis in Boston is to build dozens of projects this size. Build!

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Dozens? Try hundreds!

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...very weird...first floor looks like the ceiling height is about 7 feet....looks like something from sim city.

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The march of the Yuppies continues! Does anyone ask, or really even care, about what happened to the families who had lived in town for generations (almost all renters) and got displaced from their community because housing prices went through the roof?

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Similar to the way that so many of the "baby boom" generation from Somerville, Arlington, etc. moved out to the burbs when they came of age, many of that same generation left because of the low rents, not because of high ones.

25-30 years ago, my much older SIL and BIL lived in South Boston for the cheap rent, and left as soon as they could. There were few families there in the mid-80s. You are about 30 years off on your "exodus" and displacement spiel. The families were already gone, for much different reasons than "yuppies".

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Wrong. There's still many families in South Boston. Just don't as your BIL or SIL. They wouldn't know. Just like you don't know.

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After all, she knows both her sister-in-law and brother-in-law, who "lived there in the 1980s."

Meanwhile, some of us know people who actually grew up in Southie in the 80s and 90s and know families who have been there for generations. Some of us have even spent time in Southie getting to know the places other than the waterfront.

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packed up their bigotry and retired to the suburbs, where fellow hicks share in their racism and the brown folk won't bother them.

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The "Yuppies" are going to move in one way or the other. The less new housing there is, the more the "families who had lived in town for generations" will be displaced.

This is simple arithmetic Tom.

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