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Boston used to have several of these

Elevated subway in old Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

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Somewhere in the vicinity of Henley St, looking northbound. That's my guess...

Some time around 1900-1901 given the lack of tracks on the elevated structure.

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Seems like the only answer could be Charlestown.

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Out of business by 1938 (although I don't know where along the route it could have been.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Avenue_Elevated

Suldog
http://jimsuldog.blogspot.com

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Union Freight Railroad ran under the Atlantic Avenue el. No signs of a freight railroad here.

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Everyone knows Frank Ward's restaurant at 39 Main.

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The building on the far left with the bay windows is still there today, and is visible in Google Street View.

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Side street on right could be Sullivan?

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Warren Street by Dudley station, Roxbury.

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It is definitely Main Street Charlestown.

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Atlantic Ave. in 1907

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IMAGE(https://elmercatdotorg.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/el-train.jpg)
          ( Miami's system is 30 years old, new systems are even better! )            GMap
As Adam has shown us in other posts, the original elevated tracks throughout Boston were assembled quickly, and from the simple steel components available in those days.

This resulted in lots and lots of obstructing vertical steel columns, and large horizontal beams across the entire street. It made the streetscape dark and ugly. The noise of the primitive trains resonated in the steel framework, making it loud and irritating. The whole thing was just very unpleasant for anyone driving, walking, or living along the path of the elevated line!

Modern elevated trains need far fewer support columns; they take up very little space and don't obstruct intersections. Modern reinforced concrete and steel technologies make the whole thing lighter and more compact, quieter, brighter, and less intrusive. Like the original elevated lines, it can be constructed above existing city streets, so there's no cost to acquire property for right-of-way; and of course, it's much less expensive than digging subway tunnels. The trains too — quiet, and automated to provide frequent service, while responding to surges in demand.

Unfortunately in Boston, too many people still think of elevated trains like they were in today's mystery photo, and reflexively reject any consideration of new, rapid-transit infrastructure in their neighborhoods on elevated tracks. Not only are they uninformed about modern technology, they fail to imagine how beneficial it could be!

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I agree that elevated trains would be great! However, I don't have faith in Boston's ability to construct or maintain that kind of project. Considering how many of our construction projects are years behind schedule (if they were ever started at all), I'd want to see improvement in how we do things before I'd start thinking about additional opportunities.

But in an imaginary, efficient, cost-effective Boston, yes please!

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Its the people who vote.

Every 4 years we have elections. People vote for the person who promises the most while costing the least. They want better infrastructure but don't want to pay for it.

Every time there is a fare increase on the MBTA, people have a melt down. Yet those fare increases are just to keep things running as is.

The entire system of funding is not working. Everybody wants government to be run like a business. But it is not. The MBTA costs more than the fares it generates. Way more.

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          ( their vague vagaries are never visionary )

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Money people are not willing to spend.

Its a losing issue for a politician.

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I would be much more amenable to increases if I had any faith that the T was managed well. But as it is, I don't believe the majority of the fare hike is going towards fixing the signal issues, restoring late night service, keeping cleaners staffed, or one of many various updates that the T needs. I would be happy to pay for those things.

I am less happy to pay for crazy OT hours, reduced service, and contractors that will eventually recommend privatization. Oh, and the big dig.

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Thanks for playing, folks! This is indeed in Charlestown. It is Main Street in April of 1900.

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Those poles are all over the place, even by urban el standards.

How did the street handle traffic in later years?

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