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It's almost too late for eggs in Porter Square

Empty egg cases

Sophie went over to the Porter Square Shaw's tonight and now she wonders if New Englanders have never seen snow before. She stood in the "express" line:

Snow line at Shaw's in Porter Square

But it could be worse:

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Lol it's only a foot of snow not a hurricane

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I still should be buying more for every blizzard, though, right?

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I hope you dont plan on eating those 2015 eggs.. ewww :-)

and how do you have eggs left over? I don't eat many eggs but I do use at least one egg every other week or so, more if I go on a cookie making binge. So yeah a dozen can last me a month or two

(and yeah I have zero room to talk about expired cuz I will use eggs well over a month after the expiration but 2 years?!? ew)

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The restaurant critic gig at The Improper finds me dining out most nights. I stock a few basics: milk, butter, plain Greek yogurt, fresh berries, some cold cuts and pate, fruit preserves, bacon, olives and pickles, juice, a ton of condiments both ordinary and exotic, a lot of good cheese.

One bottle of Champagne, one of white wine, some tonic water, several kinds of vermouth with Vacu-Vin stoppers in them. (I suspect the reason many people hate vermouth is that they don't realize it spoils, once kept an open bottle on their bar for years, when it had gone rotten after a few weeks.) There's some parsley and thyme in there now, some carrots and celery. A hunk of tri-tip I broiled the other night that will make a nice sandwich for my blizzard work-from-home lunch tomorrow.

Bread, meat and sausages, ginger, and a few ice cream sandwiches in the freezer. Ice-sphere trays for whiskey. I usually have some ice-cube trays of homemade chicken and veal stock, but I'm out. (And I have an automatic ice-maker: once you get one, there's no going back.)

Between that and my larder, I can whip up a quick meal at home now and again. I'm a respectable amateur cook, a legacy of my long bachelorhood when I discovered that offering a girl a decent scratch-cooked meal was a real differentiator for a third date. (Young single men: take note. Don't be that schmuck that only subsists on fast food, takeout/delivery, and prepared supermarket foods, and can't make a decent omelet or roast a chicken properly.)

I also have a dozen eggs I bought last weekend. And one egg with a November 2016 date on it. Who says I don't live on the edge?

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I figured your gig was your excuse. You get paid to eat.

Speaking of which.. can I take along so I don't hafta cook so much? ;-)

*thinks about stuffed fridge and freezer at home full of food*

And yeah.. I'd eat that Nov 2016 egg also. Eggs really don't go bad, freshness you can tell the difference tho. Then again, as a child who crew up on a farm.. still nothing as fresh as a nice egg that was layed that morning...

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Tiverton, have a neighbor with a chicken coop who sells eggs. The color of those yolks, the flavor! Nothing like it.

I buy supermarket cage-free eggs, will spring for Chip-In Farm eggs from Bedford (South End Formaggio carries them) when I'm making raw-egg cocktails.

Everybody says they want to help the restaurant critic with his research, but call 'em up on a Wednesday night, and it's all, "Ehhh, I got a lot of Peak TV to catch up on." I have eaten entire restaurant menus for reviews solo. Good help is surprisingly hard to find.

(To say I get paid to eat is a stretch. The way I do the research, I lose money on most reviews. It's a labor of love.)

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I worked with a guy who had a chicken farm and would bring me a dozen eggs layed that morning every week. It was like being a kid again. Mmmmm

I'll have to check the Chip-In ones you suggest out. It's so hard to get nearly as good farm fresh eggs. It would be good for a treat when I make breakfast one sunday morning.

And I'd help.. ever see me? *rubs his big bear belly* I like to eat and eat good food :D And the best part, No cable TV so I don't have any 'stories' to catch up on.

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Russos has them all the time in my experience, and they're totally amazing. edit because I can't read.

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Oh Cambridge you're not getting nearly enough snow to be getting this crazy. People act like they're going to starve, carts overflowing

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Any excuse for a party is a good excuse for a party.

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So I left town on a small business trip to Provincetown (long story, but being paid to help out in an tax office). After watching the news this morning, I'm glad I did because of the messy ice and we'll probably get less snow out there. And the best part.. I don't have to shovel my walk or steps at home this storm!!

Anyways.. I made this joke to my friend who is the owner of the tax office that he better plan on half his appointments are going to be cancelled. He says "Nah everyone here is pretty hearty, a little snow doesn't stop people". So I replied "So if I go to Stop & Shop right now, there won't be massive lines and they'll be out of bread N milk?".. He just chuckled and said "oh city folks.."

So I went to Stop & Shop.. twice actually. Once at 4pm, and once again at 7pm (I forgot milk)

No lines. No shortages.Was in and out within minutes both times.. Looked just like a normal day at the Provincetown Stop & Shop in the winter. It was somewhat busy, but not packed (similar to it is in the summer time)

The only thing they were out of was their premade sandwich case was nearly empty (which is what I went for the 1st time). But bread, eggs, and milk aisles were just as full as always.

I swear the whole madness about the supermarket thing must be a city thing... country folks do not do it (my dad says they don't up there either in rural NH)

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Well, first off, the cape gets much less snow, typically, than the rest of New England, so I think your friend is being a bit selective in his scoffing.

But primarily, I think that those who mock the reoccurring runs on milk/bread/eggs/etc are missing the point - people aren't generally buying those things because they fear the snow, they're loading up in anticipation of an impromptu and guiltless break!

A snow day means a day spent with family, french toast or equiv for breakfast, sitting in a pile on the couch with bowls of popcorn and a movie (or two). And yes, maybe venturing outside to do some shoveling (blech) or go sledding (yeah)!

Who wants to run errands tomorrow when there's shameless lounging to do?

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I'll put this out there because you said something.

My friend is a South Jersey/Philly Native. Moved here about 4 years ago. He's well aware about the whole French Toast thing. They do it down there too in the city the minute some flakes fly.

Even still, my dad says the same thing and he's in the mountains of rural NH and they get far more snow than Boston does. People don't fear snow up there and learn to work around it. Everyone has "snow" tires, own sets of chains, and knows how to drive in snow. And it takes blizzard like conditions for folks up there to cancel any plans or even cancel schools. (There's always alot of heated debate up there because it does take alot for them to cancel schools up there and alot of parents are tired of it). You really just learn to live around it.

I think the worst fear up there is ice.. icing conditions just cause more problems.. slick roads and power loss (which is my dad's biggest concern since his furnace has a blower.. but he has a generator that kicks on when he loses power).

And yeah some of it is the lounge effect, but not always. I do think people fear being snowed in for the most part.

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Well cybah, I grew up on a farm in Jersey, across from Amish country and a few miles up a gravel road that often wouldn't get plowed for a day or two following big snows, so I know all about winter driving and the relative hardiness of country folk. We can swap stories if you like.

But having said that - NH is getting far less snow than eastern MA today and...whoa, lookee all those closings!

http://www.wmur.com/weather/closings

***

I just think snow hysteria isn't as endemic as people like to make out. Snow slackness, on the other hand...

Now if you'll excuse me, these waffles aren't going to eat themselves!

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I think you glazed over two key points.. sure he's from south jersey but he also lived in Philly. You said above:

so I think your friend is being a bit selective in his scoffing.

So I said that because he's lived in city and the country and sees the difference people. I don't believe he's scoffing.

As far as New Hampshire... sure they closed school but many places were anticipating more than a foot. And my point about schools (which was a very minor point) was that down here, we get 4" and they delay or cancel school.. up there, not so much. Takes a bit more to do that.

And frankly, you just solidified my point of my post.. you've lived in both the city and the country, so you know yourself that in the city its more extreme than it is in the country. Country folks don't care, city folks do. Or least your post above kinda eluded to that. That was my entire point of this post.

Anyways.. I keep losing power so yeah.. gonna try to shutdown and just nap I guess. I hope your maple goodness was delish! And sure we should swap stories sometime.. ;)

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Yeah, Seattle could work around that huge snow dump they get every 10 to 20 years.

Except for not using but maintaining those plows most of the time wouldn't be worth it.

Easier to work around it when there are only 5 people nearby, not 500,000, too.

Do your parents have air conditioning? No? If not, I'm betting that it isn't worth it for those two days a year when it is hot.

Same goes for snow. It has NOTHING to do with being special or smart or hardy or anything of the sort. It has EVERYTHING to do with being adapted to what you have to deal with on a regular basis without spending immense amounts of resources on things that you will rarely use.

That's why many buildings here struggle at 0F for longer periods of time - designing to a different standard means having resources that you not only rarely use, but that are inefficient at warmer temps.

And population density - that matters, too.

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We need the supplies in case we are stuck on the red line.

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Don't you mean "when" we are stuck... ;)

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People still remember the blizzard of 78 when supermarkets were closed and we were stuck inside for a week,

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I think that most are over that by now.

Although it would have been tough for us if we hadn't had a garage that is consistently 38F in the winter for extra food storage.

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A lot of Bostonians don't have cars or are elderly or have other mobility issues. With a big storm, the streets and sidewalks are going to be icy and slushy for a few days (or more if we get another storm over the weekend) and shopping will be more difficult. That's why I bought, yep, milk, bread, tea bags, and TP yesterday. Some people overdo it, though - I saw one woman grabbing loaves of bread like she expected to be shut in until April. The look on her face was pure terror.

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... as we had no pancake/waffle mix. Followed a recipe that came with the waffle maker -- but the baking soda (or baking powder or both) gave this a sort of bitter taste. Still, with lots of syrup etc.... -- they were edible.

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Apparently some people taste the bitter and others not. I've learned to always read ingredients when buying baking powder. I usually use Rumford brand -- I think Trader Joe's doesn't have aluminum, either.

I've also read that the bitter taste is an indication that the baking powder didn't react completely, but why use a powder that even has the possibility of ruining a whole batch of baking?

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I'll look for some alternate baking powder -- when we go shopping after _this_ storm. ;-)

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Not a huge thing, but they rebranded that Shaws back into a Star Market a few years ago.

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