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Man sues Dunkin' Donuts franchisees for not properly buttering his bagels

The Globe reports some guy has sued Dunkin' Donuts franchisees across the state because they allegedly didn't use real butter when he ordered bagels with butter. The Globe reports even the guy's lawyer thought twice about filing the suits, but figured an important principle is at stake: "A lot of people prefer butter."

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"More recently, Subway faced a widely mocked class-action suit by customers who said the chain’s heavily advertised foot-long sandwiches were not, in fact, a full 12 inches.
Ten plaintiffs won $500 each, while attorneys were awarded more than half a million dollars."

Well...maybe I'll have cream cheese with my bagel.

"The legal action may resuscitate memories of past fast-food lawsuits, such as when McDonald’s was sued by a customer who said that its coffee was so hot it burned her."

At least the Mickey D's lawsuit was on the level. Apparently the coffee was served about 50 degrees over the normal temperature and basically destroyed her skin in seconds, badly scalding her. Plus, it wasn't the first lawsuit for McD. along those lines.

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"Well...maybe I'll have cream cheese with my bagel."

Fuhgeddaboutit. DD just dumps a pathetic pustule of bogus cream cheese into your bag.

Now THAT'S criminal. Maybe I'll sue, too.

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Thank you for mentioning the McDonald's lawsuit. I'm tired of seeing that woman constantly slandered as a grasping opportunist. She was severely harmed by McDonald's recklessness:

http://www.eater.com/2016/12/14/13955424/mcdonalds-hot-coffee-lawsuit-video

http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm

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The little cruller told them they butter pay up.

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It may sound trivial, but it's important to people who have food allergies (yes, I know it was not the case here). Food establishments should be required to be honest about what they're putting on food. There are people who aren't allergic to butter but may have severe allergies to the ingredients in some margarines - but if they think they're getting butter they won't know to check into the ingredients.

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And the right way to enforce accurate ingredients is through regulatory agencies. Not random lawsuits by people who didn't actually suffer anything except eating something they didn't like as much.

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Civil lawsuit is one of the main regulatory mechanisms in this country. The ADA, for example, is entirely enforced in that manner, that's what's written into law.

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.

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Maybe DD will get sued for presenting the brown water they serve as "coffee."

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My friend Jim, who lays plausible claim to be an authentic Brooklyn Jew not of the hipster variety,, says, holding up a supermarket bagel, "interesting food item. Soulless goyische bread in the shape of a bagel. What is it called?"

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"Oh Lisa, that's a load of rich creamery butter."

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Back in the 90s and maybe up until today, Papa Gino's would use this exact liquid stuff to butter the hot dog and burger buns before toasting:

http://www.dietsinreview.com/diet_column/01/phase-oil-another-fat-secret...

If you asked for butter with your pasta(it was/is an option on their computer system), they would fill up a little 2-3oz cup with it on the side. I am sure I have eaten that much in one popcorn sitting but there is something so wrong about pouring it on pasta IMHO... especially when that linked article kinda confirms what you suspect about butter substitute in a bucket.

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IMAGE(http://www.icantbelieveitsnotbutter.com/Skins/ICBINB/images/logo.png)

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PARKA-AAAAAAAY?

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For calling what they sell as a bagel a bagel? It's not

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"I can't believe the Andelmans were lying to me about how great that restaurant that advertises on their show is!

Well, if I'm being perfectly honest, it did smother everything in ooey-gooey cheese. But the greatest veal parm in the universe? A destination worth driving to?! I was misled: horribly, horribly misled. It's just, just -- just that they seemed so *trustworthy*!"

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...But the greatest veal parm in the universe?

I just go there for the replacement windows. Oh, wait - that's the place with the good eggplant parm! Never mind.

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A line must be drawn somewhere. "Butter" should still mean something specific, not just any old spoodge that's kind of yellowish.

His next target should be movie theaters!

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Unlike the other "bakery" products, butter has a real, legal definition by the USDA. If you ask for butter and they add something that isn't legally butter, that's illegal.

Movie Theaters already understand this which is why they advertised "Butter Flavoring", not butter.

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tort reform in this country. OMG, it's NOT butter. Fine, then don't patronize the restaurant in the future. But don''t tie up the courts with another FRIVILIOUS lawsuit looking to get a undeserved cash payout.

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Or are you one of those people who don't "believe" that allergies exist and people who have them must be horrible wimpy whiners or some such.

Given your posts here about how people not like you must be subhuman ...

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Please assemble a hard statistical case with the definite impacts enumerated.

Be sure to count in there people like my friend, who has twice been injured by "substitutions" made when buying food that resulted in hospital stays for allergic reactions.

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And who cares if an allergy is triggered by what you were told was butter. The plaintiff doesn't say he's allergic, but there are certainly people who are allergic to some of the ingredients that would be present in margarine but not in butter.

It seems a simple thing to require businesses to provide the actual ingredient they're advertising.

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If this were a truck driver suing over signs on Storrow not meeting federal standards (according to you), you would be turning cartwheels with joy.

But this is about a different federal standard regarding food - known as "standard of identity" - and its example number umptybillion of why grumpy old man thinks his world is ending and everyone is stupid and needs to be put in prison or something.

Way to be consistent. Every consider thinking about an issue from more than one frame?

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How does one find a lawyer to take such a case? When I was renting my town home to a very friendly black couple the home owner association boss guy changed up the laws in a way that forced my tenants to have to leave.... he was a racist (the real kind not the fake news kind) and when I looked for legal help I couldn't get any lawyers to call me back, etc. yet when a guy wants to sue DD for butter being fake he finds a lawyer.. god bless America

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To be honest, sueing DD over butter is kinda a clear cut case. They violated the meaning of a USDA defined term. Whereas civil rights in real estate is complicated and requires real legal skill and investigation.

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It does sound silly but butter should be butter. If they can't be trusted to at least get the butter right what else are they misleading customers about?

I am not a person who believes everything should be banned but I am all for truth in presentation. If you want to serve trans fats , do it! Just make sure that you mention they are there and none of this .5 grams doesn't count crap.

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While yes, butter should be butter, expecting any kind of quality foodstuffs from the home of the blueberry coconut coolatta is just plain...I mean, come on. It's all gross, ersatz food and how it's come to represent essential morning fuel for Boston and environs is beyond me.

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Unless "butter" is explicitly written on Dunkin's menu, I don't see how the guy has a case. And do they even charge for it?

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A surprise!... Bagels at Whole Foods from the fresh bakery case are very good. But not their bagels wrapped in plastic from a different baker.

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?

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this bagel with the fake butter the attorney may have had a better chance of landing a front page bio in lawyers weekly.

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It's the lawyer.

The plaintiff will get LESS than 1 percent of the award.

"A central Massachusetts man who sued more than 20 Dunkin’ Donuts shops for allegedly using margarine when he ordered buttered bagels would receive $500 — while his attorney collects as much as $90,000 — under the terms of proposed settlement filed in Suffolk Superior Court this week."

http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/04/04/fake-butter-news-settleme...

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