Man learns to let sleeping club goers lie

A man who tried to wake up a guy seemingly passed out on a couch at Royale, 279 Tremont St. got a punch in the face for his efforts, police and bar managers told the Boston Licensing Board.

Police and bar managers said that at closing time last Nov. 5, several people noticed a man and a woman on a couch, their eyes closed and appearing to be completely out of it. A Good Samaritan started to shake the man in an attempt to revive the him. But it turned out the man was not passed out, just resting with his eyes closed. Thinking somebody was attacking him, the man responded by jumping up and punching his helper/attacker.

Bar managers said it is not unusual for club goers at the end of the night to rest on the couch while waiting for their Uber.

The board decides Thursday what action, if any, to take for the police citation for "patron on patron assault and battery."

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Comments

I can see it already

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Special "couch resting" licenses will now be issued. And patrons will be required to show a valid ID to use them.

And only the Licensing Board could figure out a way to blame a bar for something like this. Time to abolish this wasteful bureaucracy now.

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Voting is closed. 44

Not the licensing board

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The citation was issued by police. They tend to do things like that when one guy punches out another. The point of the hearing is to determine whether the club could have done something to prevent the attack, because for some wacky reason the city prefers not to have establishments where people have to worry about getting punched or worse.

As for couches, I haven't seen one in awhile, but, yes, clubs sometimes did get cited and had to explain to the Mayor's Office of Consumer Affairs and Licensing (yes, of course Boston has two licensing boards) why they were allowing dancing on couches.

For that matter, that office used to have hearings about restaurants that didn't have licenses for dancing where police found people dancing.

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Voting is closed. 41

our house, allston, couches

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couches everywhere. in those days you could actually pass out on the couches and adam would never find out about it.

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Voting is closed. 52

I'm not that much of an old fogey

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Where do you think my wife and I went on our first date? But I have to admit, we didn't dance on top of the couches.

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Voting is closed. 33

I say I'm resting.

I say I'm resting.
Here your resting!? How come not at a beach or a bar?
I say, I'm resting.

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Voting is closed. 30

What do you expect

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from a club that gets its name from a Pulp Fiction line about the French name for a Big Mac?

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Voting is closed. 30

Is a hearing required?

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The Licensing Board ought to be able to decide if something requires a hearing, or not. The incident can be part of the public record, maybe take written testimony, but spare everyone the time and money spent on a hearing.

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Voting is closed. 20

How to determine whether to have a hearing, though?

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You'd need to, um, have a hearing.

OK, OK, these hearings are quasi-judicial in nature - witnesses even have to swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. That means people/companies facing potential penalties have the right to due process. And that means, among other things, the right to cross examine witnesses. And that happens all the time. Take away the hearing, you take away that right and you open yourself up to lawsuits. I'm not sure that's a better process.

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Voting is closed. 15

Let them vote on whether to have a hearing

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Couldn't they look at the police report and the history of incidents at the establishment and decide, "Hey, no need to look into this, no action required" and then vote to NOT have a hearing. No consequences for anyone. If they decide to have the hearing, schedule it for a later date, and everyone get their day in court, so to speak.

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Voting is closed. 22