There was a certain simplicity to houses in the old days

Old house in Boston

The folks at the Boston City Archives wonder if you can place this scene. See it larger.

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Boston City Archives folks too limited by lack of understanding!

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The folks at the Boston City Archives don't understand the difference between the public funded Stenographic Record of City Council Public Meetings a more accurate on site Historic Document than the lacking inaccurate video captions for hard of hearing folks.

Edited on site in the Council Chamber during the Public Meeting the Stenographic Record is due for Historic Preservation as was done for the Stenographic Record during the Busing Era, now available at Special Collections Department Boston Public Library.

Inaccurate video captions are a remote production at WGBH studios made from video off site not actually done in the Council Chamber.

As a result of misunderstanding the difference between the two different Documents the more accurate Historic Document isn't preserved for study. New Staff are needed with better, more up to date knowledge for Historic Preservation of Data and Data Files!

RAIN Records and Archives in the News https://paper.li/RAINbyte/rainbyte#/

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Voting is closed. 7

Geez

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Since this seems like a particularly unidentifiable one - at least to me - I'll take a wild guess and say Dorchester Lower Mills. Why not?

Suldog
http://jimsuldog.blogspot.com

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Voting is closed. 10

It was in West Roxbury

Fun facts, the neighbors initially complained about this house being the wrong fit for the neighborhood and probably likely attract immigrants from Poland or even Ireland. They were also worried that more development would just lead to more horse poop on Centre St and possibly too many horses clogging up the Holy Name rotary never mind the issue of commons lands being overgrazed by the livestock of new residents.

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Voting is closed. 33

Very wild guess

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Somewhere in Mattapan in 1902.

My gut says Mattapan.

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Voting is closed. 8

This Albert St was in South

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This Albert St was in South Boston. It ran from Abbott St to 11 Kemp St. It was where O’Connor Way is now.

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Voting is closed. 12

I am always a fan of a good

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I am always a fan of a good picture finding game but I have to ask an honest question. Is there anything in this picture at all that would have helped solve the riddle? I pulled up map of that street now and can not see a single item that matches up and by the looks of it the current buildings have been there for a while (looks like 60's era housing stock.)

Those salt box houses were common for the whole region and that time period could have been anything from a rather large chunk of time as well. The only limitations would be the blue tint being limited to post 1870's

These are more fun when people have a chance at actually answering the question :/

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Voting is closed. 9

Tut tut

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Very unbostonian of you. Simply because you don’t know where something is based on where things close by used to be is no excuse. In fact, it smacks of “not from here”. This is obviously somewhere close to where Store 24 used to be by the old Hi-Fi Pizza (not the new one that used to be in Fields Corner). Learn your directions.

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Yes

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I hate to agree, but “Albert Street” is vague. Where is/was Albert Street?

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We should have specified that

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We should have specified that this Albert Street was in South Boston - its not the Albert Street near Northeastern.

A TGN Code is a geographic code from the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names. We put TGN codes in our metadata so that aggregators like Digital Commonwealth can map or sort our records by location. You can see what that sorting looks like here: https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search?f%5Binstitution_name_ssim%5D%...

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Voting is closed. 13

How do you use " 7015007 " ?

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Please explain how to use a TGN code... how do you use " 7015007 " ?

What do each of the letters represent mnemonically?... in " TGN "

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Voting is closed. 3

Albert Street??

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The city's official "A Record of the Streets, Alleys, Places, Etc., in the City of Boston", issued in 1910 by the city street-laying out department -- and available on Google Books -- lists two Albert Streets:

One is in Roxbury, extending southwest from 16 Heath Street for one block, parallel to (and just west of) the former New Haven RR tracks. The site would now be part of the Southwest Corridor.

The other is in South Boston, a private way that was laid out in 1898, also one block long, extending from Abbott Street south to 11 Kemp Street. Abbott Street was later renamed Ralston Street. This Albert Street was parallel to, and one block east of Dorchester Avenue. The site is now occupied by the Mary Ellen McCormack housing project, approximately on the site of the north-south segment of O'Connor Way.

But old atlases of both areas don't show any buildings that look like this.

As for the street in Roxbury, both the 1873 Hopkins Atlas of Suffolk County, Vol. 2, and the 1899 Bromley Atlas of Roxbury show that the west side of the street was entirely occupied by attached rowhouses (mostly built of wood), and the east side of street was the railroad tracks.

In South Boston, the 1919 Bromley Atlas of South Boston shows that there were no buildings whatsoever on either side of the one-block street.

[These atlases are all available from the State Library website, http://archives.lib.state.ma.us/handle/2452/127850.]

So... a mystery.

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Voting is closed. 10

Tall Timber

They were built with tall timber from Maine - old growth trees that were used for "balloon" construction. Balloon construction allowed for the fairly simple shapes like this and the later triple deckers.

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Voting is closed. 10