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BPS announces three superintendent finalists - one local, two from out of state

Boston Public Schools superintendent finalists: Santos, Izquierdo, Cassellius

Santos, Izquierdo and Cassellius.

The Boston School Committee has selected three finalists for school superintendent: Oscar Santos, head of school for the Cathedral 7-12 High School in Boston, Marie Izquierdo, chief academic officer of Miami-Dade County Public Schools in Florida and Brenda Cassellius, until recently commissioner of education for the state of Minnesota.

The three will be interviewed four times next week - once by a panel of community members, including one BPS parent, once by the School Committee, once by a panel of BPS students and teachers and once by a panel of parents and BPS administrators (all the interviews will be shown on the city public-access channel).

Santos, has led Cathedral, a co-ed parochial school with more than 300 students in the South End, since 2013, when he left his job as school superintendent in Randolph. Before that, he was headmaster at BPS's Boston International High School.

Izquierdo has served as chief academic officer in the country's fourth largest school district - with 350,000 students - for nearly six years. She oversees 1,200 employees and directly manages a budget of some $281 million.

Casselius was appointed Minnesota education commissioner in 2010. Before that, she served as administrator of a regional system of ten Minnesota school systems and as an associate superintendent for Minneapolis Public Schools.

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Comments

Looking forward to learning more about all three.

Santos would seem to be making the biggest jump from 300 kids to 50K kids never mind the huge budget difference.

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Voting closed 9

We reserve those jobs to Union Job Thug Enforcer for the Mayor!

#girlpower
#diversity
#newschool

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Voting closed 19

... just go away.

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Voting closed 54

Inane comment. That has nothing to do with the conversation. You're not contributing to the conversation but rather detracting from it. I just want the BPS to improve so I can send my kids there.

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Voting closed 11

Although I appreciate that its easier for me to say that living in Roslindale....

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Voting closed 3

For every person who gasps that I send my kids to BPS or laments that they "wish they could have, but, you know..." I ask if which schools they visited and what principals and teachers they met.

You already know the answer to that question.

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Voting closed 10

Which took exactly zero time.

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Voting closed 2

Considering you're usually advocating closing buildings and consolidating school communities as a cost savings. That's exactly what happens when schools close.

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Voting closed 1

when you close ALL the schools in a single neighborhood of a certain socioeconomic group and then keep other redundant schools open.

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That said, he's also the only one that appears to have first hand experience with the Boston system. That has to count for something.

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Voting closed 10

The Boston predilection for insisting that you have to be 'from here' to get stuff done as a leader is nonsense.

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Voting closed 14

...that the local politics are BRUTAL, and woe to those who don't understand that. Tommy Chang and Carol Johnson never truly got past the outsider status. The fact that they never moved their families here was also revealing that they never saw Boston as a long term place for them.

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Voting closed 3

They wont be able to make any meaningful changes, they will be fought on every decision and when things stay the same they will either choose to leave or be shown the door.

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Voting closed 34

That's the agenda. Status quo. Systemic failure, school to prison pipeline, continues. THE PLAN.

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Voting closed 7

The closest thing to a Boston candidate already failed as a superintendent in Randolph.

The mayor, who seems to view BPS as a burden, will have his all-appointed school committee rubber stamp his choice, only for the new Superintendent to answer to the mayor's Chief of Education.

The larger pool had no better candidates?

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Voting closed 16

I sat on a school committee recently (albeit smaller district of course). We were hiring a new Supt. Extreme shortage of qualified candidates. They are in high demand and usually well paid. Most everyone who is good is happy where they are. You get those trying to step up, or who want to relocate. Most others gainfully (very gainfully) employed.

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Voting closed 2

It has to be a local person. This city is all about being local. Unfortunately, someone from outside will not succeed.

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A complete shit show when it comes to public education? Why are we considering someone from there?

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Voting closed 4