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Like a bad penny, that forced hipster monicker for East Boston keeps turning up

197-207 Maverick St.

Architect's rendering. At least they'll be bringing back the Swish & Swash.

Construction has started on a 49-unit condo building on Maverick Street in East Boston that the developer has decided to call ēbo Condominiums, yes, lower case and with a macron above the "e" to let you know it gets a long pronunciation, so the name comes out like EaBo, which we thought was long dead, but Eastie Estates or Maverick Manse were just too déclassé, we guess.

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Comments

I'm not a NIMBY, I swear to God, but my WORD that building does not fit in that area AT ALL.

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Voting closed 22

But that hasn't stopped them. The city doesn't care. Growth and development look great and everything else gets swept under the rug, because the people who care about it now won't be here in a year or two and the people with the deep pockets moving in won't care because they have a building with a cool name and can pretend they live in Brooklyn or whatever.

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Voting closed 21

How many times has Eastie been redeveloped over the years? Would the first peoples recognize the timber buildings that the colonists built? Would those colonists recognize what you knew growing up?

Its a neighborhood, not a museum.

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Voting closed 23

and considering this specific building is surrounded by 3-families built around 1900, kind of a weak argument. You can talk in hypotheticals all you want, talk to me when you actually live on top of the thing (because nobody who does is happy about it).

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Voting closed 10

Why does everything have to look the same?

And how well did those triple deckers "fit in" when they were built?

Sounds like this is more about your personal issues with not liking change than any rational argument about development patterns.

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Voting closed 17

building these out in the burbs right next to your place. It doesn't have to fit in with whatever's there now either.

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Voting closed 14

I have neighbors screaming about someone putting in 11 units in "a residential neighborhood".

Next to a high school. Across from a gas station.

Meanwhile, I (like many in the area) have a modest house full of young adults who are faced with an absurdly unaffordable rental market. So I am like BRING IT and WTF cares?

Can I send them to live with you, dear? They are at least house broken.

Sorry, but I was raised in an environment where changes were being planned for and it was understood that zoning was the key to balancing the areas needs. The biggest problem where my parents lived are jackasses from the East Coast and California whining about not having personal sign off on conforming projects (OMG SEVEN STORIES TALL!!!).

Like I said, you have lived through a period of the least change, and think that is normal. I would suggest that, rather than trying this sort of I KNOW YOU ARE BUT WHAT AM I nonsense that you consider how your aversion to change does not give you special rights to the property and livelihood of others, and may be impacting your life in other negative ways.

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Voting closed 12

for market rate, of course.

And I'm by no means claiming special rights to anything--though speaking of, it's super fun to be woken up to your house literally shaking for months, or to consistently come home to find your porch and everything on it covered with construction dust, or to have to throw out a large chunk of stuff you were storing in your basement because a rat infestation happened to coincide with the start of the project.

And I'm not the only one in the neighborhood who has a problem with it, so you may want to print out the above and drop it on the porches of everyone in a block radius.

As a kicker, the ebo building also put out two local businesses that were actually useful to the neighborhood.

And, nobody currently living in the neighborhood is going to benefit from any of this.a good chunk will probably get pushed out, once again.

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Voting closed 11

I lived in Eastie for 8 years and was forced out 2 years ago. Don't miss it at all! It's so sad that so much of Boston has disappeared.

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I have to agree with you. Much of the architecture doesn't belong. I know I live in brutalist Shore Plaza. The buildings are f'ugly to say the least and there are very few amenities and they are an eyesore to the inner harbor shoreline but hey I can afford to live there. I don't understand why they want to make Eastie hip. The fact a harbor really separates us from Boston proper is a buzz kill. The Covid nightmare coupled with clueless management of public transport to boot (long lines for blue line shuttle at Gov't Center come to mind) why would anyone want to move here other than they have a car which they can choose to use and have a garage in their building or have more in on street parking than other neighborhoods.

I am saddened that Mayor Marty's administration and Beacon Hill has let development run amok. I feel bad that East Boston's nautical past is being wiped out of existence. Actually also sad that Boston so desperately wants to be NYC and is willing to divorce itself from its historical past as well to be another NYC which is so not.

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“ ebo “simplicity , can’t come with a better name ..

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It should named The Hen after what use to be there the white hen.

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Voting closed 17

The basic architecture of the general area is a bunch of triple deckers and buildings of that scale packed closely together and this is obviously not that, but what's currently there is a single story market and laundromat with a parking lot in front of it, so it's not like it blended in smoothly to begin with, it's just that that kind of sticking out like a sore thumb is something people are more used to. And there's definitely bigger apartment buildings in the immediate vicinity already. Take Victory Gardens around the corner, add retail onto the first floor, and change the blocky 20th century architecture into blocky 21st century architecture and that's pretty close to what the picture depicts. Part of the issue might just be that that style of architectural rendering with the people bustling around it makes it seem more conspicuously shiny and new.

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Voting closed 10

This is what every residential building built in the last 10 years looks like. With a few glass tower exceptions. Timid, cookie cutter designs built on the cheap.

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Voting closed 9

Here's a pretty good article on the proliferation of these types of building.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-02-13/why-america-s-new-apa...

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Voting closed 9

Not to be confused with the EBow,a beloved piece of guitarist's equipment.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EBow

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Voting closed 17

This is obviously some new usage of the word "beloved" with which I was not previously familiar.

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Voting closed 14

...not a guitar player.

:-)

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Voting closed 9

In general Boston needs to do a better job of encouraging more residential development, but I think that name is enough to justify revoking all permits immediately.

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Voting closed 36

Not that I mind this perfect melancholia.

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Voting closed 21

to people being afraid to cross the harbor? Eastie was much better back then.

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Voting closed 29

if they tart up the building with some incongrous SoCal hipster touches and call it eBo-LA?

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Voting closed 28

And realize that the years in which nothing much changed in the area were far more of an anomaly than the history of the area would predict?

This is a strand of local culture that has always driven me nuts. CHANGE HAPPENS. You can plan for it and deal with it, but many just choose to resist it and then bitch about the consequences of that denial.

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Voting closed 9

Nobody wants to live there until it ends up in the white zone on the State Covid Stats Map. Maybe East Boston, Chelsea and Everett were getting close to yellow at one point but then no they fell behind. Numbers could change overnight. Ya just don't know.

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Voting closed 8

I miss my place in Eastie. Probably my favorite neighborhood. I agree it was better when it was low key the people thought the blue line was just airport or end of the world

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Voting closed 11

The whole section of East Boston between Maverick Square and the water feels totally transformed over the past few years.

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Voting closed 14

Roxbury is the new place for investment property.

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