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BPS to open more schools next week

WBZ reports BPS next week will re-open 28 schools to roughly 1,700 "high needs" students, under pressure from state education officials. The district is currently providing in-school education and services to roughly 150 high-needs students.

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Students definitely invited back: "Students with disabilities in inclusion classrooms with high needs, as defined by the PL3 in the student’s IEP," SLIFE (ELL students with limited/interrupted education). Not clear if students involved with DCF that don't meet this criteria are invited back.

The list of schools is not available publicly, but we can surmise a few obvious schools (BINCA, the Frederick, other schools with a SLIFE strand or SPED strands not already attending).

I'm not in BPS but follow with moderate interest so I am curious to know the full list and what groups were and weren't chosen.

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Well gee that's just the right thing to do as cases surge ahead in the Commonwealth. By all means let's send teachers who also have families back into rooms with no proper ventilation other than opening a window or two. That should do it!

The state had from April - August to figure out a solid plan to teach from home and what did they do? Nothing... except sh*t on the teachers.

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It's a timely move. The worst of August-September-October is thankfully over.

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Have you looked at a chart or the numbers lately? They're rising daily and we're about to get a surge from all those who ignored public health advice and had family Thanksgiving gatherings.

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If so, get in here right now, 'cause we're witnessing the birth of a word. We'll define it as "a self-inflicted injury made especially humorous by the speaker's choice of name." I'm workshopping ideas for the actual word. Some kind of combination of "eponymous" and "hilarious" and "idiotic," maybe? What about "eponysterical"?

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I ride by one of their schools and kids are going in and things seem pretty normal. I guess their teachers union isn't as powerful as the one in Boston.

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At themselves for abandoning these kids. I hope the city and school parents remember this when they demand a raise.

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The vast majority of Brookline students are from families who have the privilege to work from home, work at distance, not take public transportation, live in large houses with relatively few people?

But sure, let's laud the super rich, racist suburbs for the luxury of their wealth and disparage the poor all in the name of taking a shots at a union. Cool stuff.

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There is a fair amount of evidence that schools are not leading to major spreading events particularly for younger grades. There is also overwhelming evidence that online learning for this group has been a major failure and that the loss in-person teaching is going to haunt this generation for decades.

There are no easy decisions but that assumption that "classrooms = death" is inaccurate.

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...

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But I guess dying teachers isn't enough to cause concern?

Funny how "what aspect of the pandemic we are concerned about now" and "what aspects of the pandemic we ignore" are conveniently linked to "what me want NOW" rather than "what is ethical, what is acceptable, and what is equitable".

Also important: the vast majority of pediatricians are not specifically trained in public health. Keep it in mind when they sound off.

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what is ethical, what is acceptable, and what is equitable

That is the most important question as it relates to schools and everything else. Is it ethical and equitable to deny someone an effective education? What are the risks teachers face? Can the risks be lowered without making children attend class remotely?

I'm not a crazy no-mask MAGA person but I also don't sit around and think about things in stark black and white terms. As a society we need to constantly be looking at the data and making changes.

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A few points to consider:
1) BPS buildings are poorly ventilated and in disrepair
2) kids above 6th grade are on the MBTA to get to school - another oppty to spread COVID
3) kids over 10 spread this as well as adults
4) In person learning in Boston presently looks like at home learning hosted in a school classroom. No live teaching, kids sitting in a classroom on a laptop

For all of the above reasons I would suggest we prioritize the highest need students (homeless, IEP, etc), particularly those under 10, put them in the BEST ventilated buildings and everyone who can stay home do so. If you have the wifi and work from home so kids wont be alone just keep them home.

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Who have to stay home and not work while their kids are at home?

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We also acknowledge that a home environment conducive to distance learning is also even more associated with privilege -- the affordability of an adequate internet connection and computer, as well as a parent with the flexibility to work from home and keep tabs on whether their children are attending class and doing assignments. Not to mention having enough money to keep kids fed with nutritious breakfasts and lunches.

The kids who end up with the most negative impacts from distance learning are generally the ones who were already behind to begin with.

So yeah, let's ignore the profound negative impacts on kids who already needed extra help and their parents who can't work because they have to stay home with their kids.

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But teachers, will anyone think of teachers?

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I assume everyone's aware that there are no drinking fountains in the school buildings? There are signs everywhere not to drink the water. Yes most buildings are well over 75yo. Because nobody wants to financially support public education. Students ( and staff) do not have windows that open, heating systems that are efficient or can keep the temperature between 65&80, or drinking water, never mind having to share books etc., now all of a sudden people care about our students........mmmm seems unlikely.

Brookline is a different universe from BPS, even obvious when looking down from the white ivory castle windows.

Yes, schools could be the safest place for students, but not in Boston. I would urge everyone to volunteer inside a BPS for 3 days before ranting.

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The seer of Covid, Dr. Fauci, pronounced on television yesterday, that the safest place for children is school.

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