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Guess we know who won't be signing up for the vaccination lottery

Protesters outside DESE meeting in Malden

Tim Lanning spotted a small group of vaccine-denialist anti-maskers this morning in Malden Center, outside a meeting of the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education board, scheduled to discuss post-pandemic guidance for schools that might include eliminating all Covid-19 masking requirements for the fall, given that most people in Massachusetts have gotten shots.

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Comments

identify Fauci as a villain in the pandemic. Those feckin'-eedjit adults need to go back and repeat middle-school science.

Bad enough you put your own lives at risk, but your kids, too? I won't weep when you take yourselves out of the gene pool.

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there are very few arguments that can counter

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I will not give a damn, as they'll deny it all the way to death.

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Ignorance, willful or otherwise, leading to preventable harm and death is still an unfortunate result of them being mislead, misguided or misinformed.

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Because they will put a burden on healthcare workers, serve as an incubator for covid variants, and infect others.

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At least just plain stupid people can sometimes be moved to reason, in a situation such as this.

These people are either conspiracy theorists and/or anti-vaxxers themselves, or they're in bed with the conspiracy theorists and the anti-vaxxers. They're just plain willfully stupid, vicious, or both, plus they're the reason that the pandemic got so rampant and so out of control here in the United States. It's beyond disgusting, and these people need to be leaned on and hit in their pocketbooks for endangering the overall public.

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I have a young child under the age of 5. He is up to date on all of his vaccinations, however, if approved, he will not be getting a COVID jab. There are serious health concerns for young children and it appears the risk doesn't outweigh the reward.

Signed, A fully vaccinated parent...

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n/t

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Citations needed here, especially considering the EUA requests haven't even been filed for that age group for any of the vaccines currently being administered in the US. Which means the set of data for that age group has not been reviewed, so uh, how can you draw a conclusion based on data that hasn't been collected yet? I mean, the Pfizer under 12 continuous phase 1/2/3 trial is still recruiting new participants so... (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04816643?term=BNT162b2&recrs=af&a...)

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and it appears the risk doesn't outweigh the reward.

So in other words, the risk of getting the shot doesn't outweigh the reward of your child not getting covid and possibly dying, and therefore it makes sense for him to get vaccinated.

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but all vaccines do have some (very low) probability of serious side effects. Younger people are at a lower risk of having a serious case of covid and the vaccine isn't 100% effective (because nothing ever is). Considered individually, it's possible that the risk/benefit is razor thin. I don't know for sure that it is, but it certainly moves in that direction. (There are certainly open questions about long term effects of covid for children, but there are also open questions about long term effects of the vaccine).

HOWEVER,

considered from a societal standpoint, those kids may not be as likely to get a serious infection, but they could still help spread the disease. I don't have a kid, so I don't know what I would do, but this seems like the more important part to me. An unvaccinated child is a risk to others even if the risk to the child is minimal.

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Risks to children of COVID are NOT NONEXISTANT. Risks of the vaccine so far are EXTREMELY LOW.

I suggest that if you have no sense of proportion and such a poor grasp of statistics that you defer to people who know this stuff - like doctors and scientists.

Then again, you probably have plenty of stories of "kids thrown clear" of an exploding car because they weren't in a car seat/seat belt (denying the carnage that results in most cases when kids are thrown from a car).

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if approved, he will not be getting a COVID jab.

even if it's approved you would withhold a lifesaving vaccine from your child based on... your own interweb-fueled speculation?

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My family is all fortunately free of any conditions that would put us at particularly high risk with regards to a newly approved vaccine or at high risk were we to contract COVID.

Other people's children, however, are immunocompromised, undergoing cancer treatments, or have fragile systemic illness that makes them higher risk for getting a recently approved vaccine. So we take the risk and vaccinate so we can achieve the herd immunity that will protect these folks. Because, you know, protecting the children.

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Anyone who owns a mini-megaphone to scream at protests as a full time job is not someone I would consider to be on the same level as my kids' doctor. These people look like the people who stormed the White House during the failed coup.

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stormed the White House since what, 1814?

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There have been security breeches of the White House since then, some of a somewhat aggressive nature, but nothing on the level of what happened down the street on January 6th.

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Though the US Capitol is a white building that contains a chamber that we call "The House", it is not the same as the White House.

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Moreover, they're acting like them, also.

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so stupid she stormed the Capitol Records building.

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They are already required to vaccinate their special little tenderspawn already. This is yet another fucking dimwit anti-science tantrum by the usual stupidspects.

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Massachusetts is one of forty-four states that let parents exempt their children from the vaccination requirement for religious reasons. And it doesn't matter that very few religions are opposed to vaccination--"I believe this, because God spoke to me through my refrigerator" is as valid, legally, as citing the pope.

Interestingly, that law has an exemption for epidemics, which means they could require the Covid vaccine, even if the parent has invoked a religious exemption for the other vaccine requirements.

Every state allows medical exemptions, but that's specific to the individual child, and sometimes the specific vaccine. If your child is allergic to an ingredient in a vaccine, they don't have to get that vaccine. Some immune-suppressed children can defer or be exempted from all vaccines.

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Allowing people to be exempt from vaccines, especially the Covid-19 vaccinations, for religious reasons is absolutely and totally asinine--and inane, to boot. Look what happened at that school in New York, when kids were exempt from the MMR vaccine for religious reasons: There was a huge outbreak in that school as a result. The results could be way worse, with the Covid-19 virus.

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As a devout follower of the Church of My Refrigerator, I take offense.

Peas be with you.

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Valid medical reasons fly here (like immunocompromise and anaphalaxis). Religious ones? Not so much.

California seems to have a "don't ask don't tell" policy and they have paid dearly for their developing world rates of vaccination.

The bar is vastly higher in MA than in CA - so much higher that when there was a US measles outbreak and my son went on a school trip to Spain, his group wasn't even asked for the vax records they were carrying - but a California-based group coming in the same day at nearly the same time was turned back.

There are exemptions - and then there is validation.

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"There is not yet enough evidence on the use of vaccines against COVID-19 in children to make recommendations for children to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Children and adolescents tend to have milder disease compared to adults. However, children should continue to have the recommended childhood vaccines."

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More evidence is needed on the use of the different COVID-19 vaccines in children to be able to make general recommendations on vaccinating children against COVID-19.

WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) has concluded that the Pfizer/BionTech vaccine is suitable for use by people aged 12 years and above.Children aged between 12 and 15 who are at high risk may be offered this vaccine alongside other priority groups for vaccination. Vaccine trials for children are ongoing and WHO will update its recommendations when the evidence or epidemiological situation warrants a change in policy.

added emphasis mine

Lack of evidence today does not mean lack of evidence tomorrow. And they agree with the FDA on Pfizer for 12+, which was based on clinical evidence.

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19...

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