Hey, there! Log in / Register

Losing Senate candidate who once dreamed of collecting hundreds of millions from state officials in election lawsuit now faces tens of thousands in fines for disobeying court rules

Dotted lines connecting people in Ayyadurai's conspiracy theory

Ayyadurai said he used his advanced visualization knowledge to create this dotted-line conspiracy chart that he filed in court.

A federal judge today formally dismissed most of repeat Senate loser Shiva Ayyadurai's increasingly conspiracy-drenched lawsuit against state elections officials and a national association of election officers, but kept alive what the judge considers the most interesting legal question of the suit: Whether Twitter colluded with those officials to permanently ban him from the platform, in possible violation of his First Amendment rights.

In a sometimes hostile hearing in which US District Court Judge Mark Wolf twice ordered Ayyadurai to shut up - once while pointing his index finger over the Zoom connection at the self described genius - the judge said he was dismissing the parts of Ayyadurai's suit that claimed the officials were guilty of RICO violations and that they owed him millions of dollars in damage. Wolf ruled the officials, including Secretary of State Bill Galvin, are protected from monetary demands by the legal concept of "qualified immunity." Ayyadurai initially sought more than $1 billion.

Instead, Wolf ordered Ayyadurai's lawyer to file a possible revised law suit focusing only on the First Amendment issue and the question of whether Twitter became a "state actor" by banning him - even if it was months after the state filed a single complaint about one of his tweets. Twitter has said it will fight any attempt to join it to the case, that it has its own First Amendment rights to decide what to allow on its platform - in this case to not allow right-wing conspiracists free rein to promote their theories after Jan. 6.

At the same time, Wolf raised the question of perjury and the Fifth Amendment to discuss what he considered possible wrong-doing by Ayyadurai, now on his third lawyer on the case, which he has also frequently handled by himself. Ayyadurai at first claimed the Secretary of State's office stole last September's Republican nomination for Senate from him; he now claims Bill Galvin, other election officials here and in other states, Twitter, Mark Zuckerberg, various professors at Harvard, MIT and Stanford, Associated Press and a Rockefeller family foundation are conspiring not just to destroy him but to eliminate all Americans' rights to free speech, using software imported from the United Kingdom.

Attorneys for the state and the national association called on Wolf to just toss the case entirely, saying the nonsense has gone on long enough and that their clients keep getting threats - some of which they've referred to the FBI - by Ayyadurai's riled up fan base. The judge told the lawyers to file proof of such harassment by Friday.

In July, Wolf was only considering possible fines and sanctions - which could include dismissal - for the way Ayyadurai fired his second lawyer two days before key motions were due to be filed, even though that would force yet another delay in the case. Wolf said nobody has the right to force a delay like that.

But today, Wolf demanded an answer to another question: Whether Ayyadurai wrote a detailed legal memorandum on a proposed new complaint, submitted July 22, by himself or whether yet another lawyer, based in California at the law firm that represented him in a lawsuit over whether he really invented e-mail, wrote all or part of it.

Lawyers who have not told a judge they are representing a client are not allowed to do that; nor are people represented by a lawyer, as Ayyadurai was that day, allowed to file court documents like that.

Even aside from the fact that the font on the document was different from the one Ayyadurai had used over several months of earlier self-filed documents, Wolf said it just didn't read like any of Ayyadurai's previous and often lengthy filings. "This one stood out because it seemed to be written in a much more lawyer-like way than anything you've submitted to me before and since," he told Ayyadurai. Also, his current lawyer, Timothy Cornell, filed a document saying he didn't sign the memorandum because it was written by the California lawyer.

Ayyadurai said he changed the font at Cornell's suggestion to be more professional. He insisted he wrote the whole thing himself, only reading it out loud as he did so that other people in his office could offer suggestions. And while the California lawyer, Dilan Esper, also made suggestions, Ayyadurai said he didn't use any of them; they came in too late. Ayyadurai explained the change in writing style by saying he is simply a good learner, in this case to be more professional in his writing.

"I am not in stasis," he said. "Maybe I'll also go to Harvard Law School and become a lawyer one day."

Both he and Cornell said Cornell's assertion about who wrote the document was wrong, that Cornell had simply made a mistake.

Wolf ordered Cornell to explain in writing why Wolf shouldn't charge Ayyadurai at least $20,250 in fines for the way he fired his second lawyer two days before key motions were due to be filed, even though that would force yet another delay in the case. The money represents the number of hours defense lawyers have spent on the case dealing with the aftermath of Ayyadurai's decision to fire one lawyer and hire another - a total of 45 as of last night - times $450, the hourly rate Cornell said he is charging his client.

Wolf also said he will order the California lawyer to appear before him to answer the question of whether he had anything to do with the filing. Wolf had ordered Esper to appear today, but he refused, saying he was not a lawyer on the case and anything he told Ayyadurai would be protected by attorney/client privilege. Wolf said Ayyadurai waived that right in a closed-door hearing before the public one, and that Esper will be called before him not as a lawyer but as "a material witness" - one who could face a contempt citation if he tries to not appear again.

"I am not pleased with Mr. Esper's failure to appear at all," he said. "I think there's a good chance we'll meet Mr. Esper."

Wolf acknowledged that in addition to fines, he can dismiss the case completely - and said he has yet to rule that out. But he said he remains reluctant to do that, despite arguments from assistant state Attorney General Adam Hornstine and the lawyer representing the national association that their clients long ago deserved to clear their name, to stop getting harassed by Ayyadurai fans, and to get back to the business of running elections.

"Embedded in this case are some serious issues," Wolf said. "The kernel of the case is whether [there has been] a violation of the First Amendment," whether through coercion by Bill Galvin and his officials or "close collaboration between elections officials and Twitter."

Normally, in addition to qualified immunity, the state officials would also be protected by the Eleventh Amendment, which bars suits against officials doing their jobs, while Twitter, still technically not a defendant, would be protected by its own First Amendment rights to decide what to allow on its own platform.

But from the beginning of the case, Wolf has said he was struck by how Galvin's elections division filled out a Twitter complaint form last fall about an Ayyadurai tweet that alleged the state had destroyed one million electronic ballots, which he claimed cost him victory in the September Republican primary.

Twitter didn't respond to the complaint and did not delete Ayyadurai's tweet, but temporarily banned him for similar tweets and then, after the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, banned him permanently. Wolf says this raises the issue of whether Twitter became a "state actor" in doing Galvin's bidding - a claim that Ayyadurai has expanded over the past several months to come up with his global conspiracy theory.

Wolf said that if he does decide to let the narrowed case continue, he's going to keep Ayyadurai on a short leash - even to the point of threatening criminal contempt charges against him, which could mean jail time. "What's past is not prologue," he said.

When Ayyadurai began to recite his entire conspiracy theory, in answer to the question of how he came to fire his second lawyer, Wolf cut him off.

"OK, stop," he said, just as Ayyadurai was about to explain how his parents came here from India to escape tyranny. "Do you hear me?" the judge asked. Ayyadurai stopped.

Later in the hearing, Wolf and Ayyadurai bickered over whether the plaintiff should hand over as evidence the e-mail messages that might have incorrectly led his current lawyer to believe that Esper had written the legal filing at the heart of the potential-fines question.

Wolf cut him off again. "You want to litigate the Eleventh Amendment issue," he said, beginning to jab his finger at Ayyadurai through his screen. "Now I'm going to explain to you one more time what you need to do to try to do that, so listen!"

Wolf ordered all the filings, including the new more limited complaint to be filed well before hearings he scheduled to start Aug. 25.

Topics: 

Ad:
Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

the pictures with twine.

I'm starting to wonder less if this guy is a thirsty troll and rightie-dimwit fleecer, and more if he's simply an unhinged ding-dong with delusions of grandeur and competence. Imagine being dumb enough to vote for this pitiful schmuck.

up
Voting closed 42

IMAGE(https://en.meming.world/images/en/7/78/Pepe_Silvia.jpg)

up
Voting closed 57

Has Shiva referenced bird law yet? That just might be the key strategy he's missing.

up
Voting closed 27

Google him -- he's an unhinged ding-dong as well as a two-bit con man. For example, he's sued dozens of people who point out that he didn't "invent email" as he's so fond of claiming.

If it weren't so deeply problematic, Dr. Email is a prime example of how I wish universities would revoke diplomas based on public behavior -- this guy is an embarrassment to anyone else who went to MIT.

up
Voting closed 25

He did in fact "invent EMAIL" in the sense that he once developed what was the first modern email client featuring an address book and some other features, which he called "EMAIL". That's how he won money in those lawsuits.

It would be ironic if he comes out a winner in his argument over social media and goverment collusion, and then for years attorneys from Harvard Law Scool will have to cite Shiva v. Twitter in their arguments.

up
Voting closed 13

Gawker, already just about dead because of the Hulk Hogan case, simply gave up and settled the libel suit.

He then sued TechDirt for also disparaging his claims to be the Father of Email, they fought back, and he lost.

At best, US District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor ruled today, Ayyadurai invented an e-mail system; whether he is the father of all e-mail, however, is a question that is open to legitimate public debate.

up
Voting closed 22

(Seriously, Shiva's bus has been sitting on and off for several months at an autobody shop in Medford on my route to work; guess he needs that sweet twitter money to fix it properly)

The more and more I read his arguments, the more I suspect this guy has a serious social-emotional disorder, like ODD or a Social Communication disorder; where those with it assume they're right on everything, and even with more and more evidence otherwise, begin to shut down and believe in bigger and bigger conspiracies that don't make sense, because it's easier to believe than them making a mistake or not being right in the first place. His sister in an interview years ago suggested that her brother is very smart, but is easily influenced by others contradicting him.

I keep wondering where he gets his money for all these failed political runs and lawsuits; yeah, for a while after the Gawker downfall, every news site caved and paid him to go away after a writer would try to debunk him, but that money can't have lasted that long. So who's got him bankrolled? Fellow tech assholes, like Thiel? Koch heads? MAGA hats? And how long before they get sick of him and let him just dance for middle fingers on the Fellsway?

up
Voting closed 35

Some of the people on this chart would no doubt march his ass into court for a sweet and well-deserved defamation payout.

up
Voting closed 16

I tried to zoom in and figure out why one woman in sunglasses is in black and white like a real Mata Hari, but it's low-res.

Maybe if I had advanced visualization knowledge I could figure it out.

All my basic visualization knowledge can figure out is that's a heck of a lot of people all involved in three colors of lines to boil down, at the bottom, to Twitter telling him to GTFO with his crazy-ass nonsense.

up
Voting closed 20

It's well know she's had it out for Ayyadurai ever since Whitewater.

up
Voting closed 19

That's no Mata Hari, it's just just Michelle Tassinari flipped left-right and made to look scary in black and white. I guess seven pictures of her in color right-side-right wasn't enough to make the point.

On the other hand, when the crazy wall is larger you can see all the dotted lines, which increases the crazy.

I used to have advanced visualization knowledge, but then the tab wore off.

up
Voting closed 18

And wow. Just wow.

Who knew that Michelle Tassinari is such a powerful person? She even directs (looks down and to the left) Michelle Tassinari.

Or is it Amy Cohen? I mean, Cohen's photo is more in the center, but there is that line above her to Tassinari.

up
Voting closed 20

"supported Tassinari and Cohen's false narrative that Dr. Shiva was not credible"

One would tend to conclude, based on this chart, that Dr. Shiva requires zero help with the whole "not credible" narrative.

(oh, and there were no ballot images to delete - the lunatic fringe seems to firmly believe that if their marks are technologically illiterate, they can just magically conjure up things that either don't exist or are not relevant and then claim they were destroyed/deleted).

up
Voting closed 14

This is the key - the shadowy figure at the center of this vast conspiracy to supress the genius of Shiva Ayyadurai, so devious and powerful he can even keep himself out of this diagram, is Shiva Ayyadurai.

up
Voting closed 17

The one at the very heart of the very big, worldwide conspiracy out to get him.

up
Voting closed 14

Ayyadurai explained the change in writing style by saying he is simply a good learner

He's amply demonstrated the opposite. If I were judge, I'd toss this lawsuit, and enjoin the plaintiff from filing similar time-wasters.

up
Voting closed 29

Ayyadurai explained the change in writing style by saying he is simply a good learner

That was the instant the judge decided that he had indulged the guy's delusions but he was not going to indulge outright lies.

up
Voting closed 15

This is satire, right? Please?

Shiva's antics are so ridiculous that if there actually was a massive conspiracy against him, I would like to join it.

up
Voting closed 34

And all I got was this fricking t-shirt

up
Voting closed 30

I imagine that could be listed on a resume. Then how many times listed in the Conspiracy chart.

up
Voting closed 11

So why isn't the previous president looking to hire this guy? None of his lawyers have come up with this chart - or anything like it.

up
Voting closed 17

I thought there were dozens and dozens of unique people working to undermine the guy who didn’t invent anything but Amy Cohen is pictured at least half a dozen times in this chart! Looking at the high res version there are many repeat photos.

Launch this guy into the ocean already

up
Voting closed 16

I really do hope the state finds it appropriate to provide Michelle Tassinari with some State Police encores for a while or at least check in with her on occasion. This chart looks bonkers and she is the center of his crazy web, including a wild looking Janus thing going on at the top. I would give her a restraining order against him just for the heck of it too...

up
Voting closed 12

I would have sworn that "architected" was not a word, but it turns out that it is, although it is "somewhat clunky and only a few standard dictionaries recognize it." This guy really IS a genius!

/snark

up
Voting closed 13

This guy actually has a fan base? I know nothing in politics should surprise me anymore, but it's so hard to imagine someone watching Mr E-mail in action and thinking "that's him, that's the guy I'm rooting for."

up
Voting closed 12

It would be very entertaining to get a visual remix networked diagram of "garbage in" converted to "garbage out" with lots of connecting lines.

up
Voting closed 16

Edward Tufte.

up
Voting closed 14

with the Brooklyn Bar Menu Generator?

https://www.brooklynbarmenus.com/

It’s a bit old now, but still enjoyable. I think there’s definitely a need for a Conspiracy Diagram Generator along the same lines.

up
Voting closed 11

Looks like a fun crowd and good bragging rights. Like the modern Four Hundred. Tell me, how do I get on that poster?

up
Voting closed 11