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Boston to expand pre-K seats, programs

Mayor Wu today announced a $20 million investment to expand the number of seats available in BPS pre-K classrooms and to bolster services available to child-care providers, including "developmental and behavioral health screenings, student support interventions, culturally relevant and challenging curriculum."

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culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k ?
Learning your numbers and alphabet has a cultural angle?

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For kindergarden, it means things like including "My Abuela and Me!" and "One Month of Ramadan" to "Make Way for Ducklings" and "The Night Before Christmas" in the curriculum. Adding classroom celebrations (which is a calendar tracking and themed coloring sheets, for the most part) of Hanukah and Diwali to Thanksgiving and Easter. Might mean learning to count to 10 in Spanish as well as English.

Nobody's teaching pre-k Critical Race Theory, don't worry.

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This is all stuff we used to do in the 1980s pretty much.

Googling "Cultural Competence in Early Childhood Education" is easy but there appears to be a lot of rhetoric in there.

Valuing diversity. Valuing diversity means accepting and respecting differences between and within cultures. ...
Conducting cultural self-assessment. ...
Understanding the dynamics of difference. ...
Institutionalizing cultural knowledge. ...
Adapting to diversity.

etc etc

What about the "dominant culture" (mentioned below) is wrong, bad, needs to be changed, etc etc?

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What about the "dominant culture" (mentioned below) is wrong, bad, needs to be changed, etc etc?

Who said it was?

This is the worst possible version of hit dogs hollering.

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I have you blocked so can't see what you wrote but can see you responded.

I'm guessing it doesn't answer any of my questions (since you never really know anything or post anything you just police message boards).

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that your question of "What about the "dominant culture" (mentioned below) is wrong, bad, needs to be changed" is a strawman, since no one said anything of the kind. Providing multicultural options is not some kind of attack on the dominant culture, and it's a pretty weird thing to jump to that conclusion!

Anyway, for more examples, how about one from the article of providing more multilingual options? That's definitely culturally relevant, and I can say at least personally, something that was not provided in my school in the 80s where non-English speakers were expected to muddle through things until they figured it out on their own.

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But again, what are examples of the "dominant culture" being used to teach/manage things and how are we changing it? I saw some examples of expanding religious or language teachings which was very common in the schools I attended in the 1980s and I assume Boston public schools were the same if not better.

historically been based on the ways of teaching and managing these things in the dominant culture.

I'm guessing it is the European/White traditions of individuality and property ownership? About taking pride in themselves as individuals or their country (America)? I am seriously interested in how a classroom addresses these issues, especially how many multi-generational African-American students will have those same values of private property, individualism, and taking the "look at me and what I can do" approach.

And when you look at the concept of "helping others" as not being a European/American tradition, how can you not look at that as something as something "good" versus "bad".

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Can't read my posts but can passive-aggressively respond to them? May I suggest SKIN-SO-THIN!

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Kids in pre-K are primarily learning how to function in a classroom. Learning about other people is an important part of that. More about learning how to put your own coat on or waiting for your turn for the teacher's attention.

Numbers and letters are more the focus in Kindergarten and reading in 1st Grade. Although some kids are developmentally ready in the earlier grades and do learn those things, the range of birthdates in one year's cohort and the broad range of typical development make it a focus for later grades.

Kids need to learn about the rhythm and expectations of school and being part of a larger, more complex community is necessary to set them up to learn at their best pace when they get to Kindergarten and 1st Grade.

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And both were in pre k and both learned the alphabet and colors and had playtime and Naptime and how to follow directions from the teacher and how to act with other children there was no culturally relevant instructions going on.( Unless all of that is now labeled as culturally relevant learning)I have plenty of experience with the Boston public schools and it just sounds like a buzzword, like equity learning.... which they use a lot

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They taught your kids in a culturally relevant manner because you belong to the dominant culture. If you didn't, you would notice ways in which the approaches didn't entirely align with your cultural practices.

The ways that early childhood education approaches things like meals, hygiene, dressing, responsibility for belongings, independence, peer relationships, adult relationships, etc. have historically been based on the ways of teaching and managing these things in the dominant culture. Since schools include students from all different cultural backgrounds, teachers need to understand how these routines are viewed and taught in the students' homes, and need to teach in ways that include and affirm everyone.

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You seem to know a lot about me and my kids.

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Only what came through in your comment.

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So when you enroll a child in pre k will they ask you what culture your child should be taught? My kids are mixed race so they would ask where their grandparents came from and assume that's the culture they should be taught or they could ask mom or dad.... Or they could assume they belong to the " dominant culture" and teach how to count, read letters and play with other kids in that culture?
Most people learn their families or ancestors culture at home, it's a better place to learn it, Pre K teachers have their hands full and asking them to teach in different ways to different kids is too much.

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There's no room for a conversation with you if you won't acknowledge that there is a dominant culture and that it's always been present in the socialization that children receive in pre-k and early-grade education.

Most people learn their families or ancestors culture at home

This is manifestly not true, but if you are a member of the dominant culture, it takes an extra step to see outside your own experiences. The dominant culture reflects your experiences, and for you to understand that it even exists, you have to be the proverbial fish that is capable of understanding what water is, and that water is not the natural and normal environment in all places. Not everyone is ready to do that.

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My question was what is culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k?
Does the teacher have a list of the 20 or so kids backgrounds and prepare a curriculum for them? No one has defined what it is yet, just a lot of buzzwords.
We are talking about pre k not high school.
The curriculum in pre k is pretty straightforward.

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My question was what is culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k?

I'm not a pre-k teacher, and I'm pretty sure you aren't either, so likely neither one of us is the best candidate for what a pre-k curriculum would be. If you want some ideas for what might be included, though, take a look at We Need Diverse Books as just one example. Their focus is of course on literature/books, and that's not the only aspect of pre-k education, but their site is full of resources on books that show a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. Their goal is to "create a world in which all children can see themselves in the pages of a book", which certainly seems like a good thing to me. Do you agree?

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But I'm a Mom and have one kid in BPS and one in private school, both went to pre k in the BPS system and those books are in Boston public schools already. Announcing a culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k after spending more money on pre k sounded like something new to me.

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Announcing a culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k after spending more money on pre k sounded like something new to me.

It probably is? And a good new thing, yes?

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When it can't be defined, the BPS website has nothing on it, it could be a speech writer for the Mayor made up the term for all we know.

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I was literally mentally placing bets that after I labeled your colorblind racism nonsense, you'd claim that your kids are not entirely white (as if this makes colorblind racism OK? It makes it 100x worse in fact), and you didn't disappoint. It's so textbook.

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What culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k is,, you're a colorblind racist?
And if you mention you're mixed race it's a bingo card? OK

Still looking for the what culturally relevant and challenging curriculum for pre k means, and how it's implemented.
Someone mentioned using a Spanish word for Grandmother but there must be more to it than that for a curriculum.
We are talking about pre k here, it sounds like buzzwords to sound noble but actually means nothing, one of the reasons the BPS was thisclose to being taken over by the state is stuff like this.

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in early education this includes books, dolls, puppets, foods and clothing in dramatic play, among other things that showcase a variety of cultures. Important to remember that learning about other cultures in the 80s/90s/00s and even now, in some places, was/is approached in a tourism like manner -focusing on holidays- rather than looking at other countries and cultures and learning about them in meaningful ways that young children can understand. One way that would connect literacy and STEM is how homes around the world are built. Talk about the materials used, why the maybe used, how the houses are structured, and why it might be that way. Are they similar to the homes we live in?

Early education is so much more than ABCs. What child learn in the early childhood classroom effects their outcomes well beyond kindergarten.

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what eeka said. In particular, kids should not be considered "bad" or punished when the way things are done in their home environments differs from what is expected in preschool.

For things that are important (i.e., safety issues and the like), they should be taught how things are done in school in a way that doesn't denigrate their home environments but simply explains that some things are done differently in different places and this is how things are done at school. For things that aren't important, they should be allowed to act in the ways that are the norm in their homes.

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And thee $20 million comes from?

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Taxpayers. Investing in pre k is easily one of the best uses of taxpayer money. Studies have shown it more than pays for itself.

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Taxpayer money? Citation please!

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With early education we won't end up with people like you who don't understand the value of early education for society.
/s

But you can look at this or try this if you want something more local.

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1 - I have a master’s in engineering. My wife has a bachelor’s in business. We both do very well because of our education. So, early and all levels of education isn’t lost on me and a big reason why my son will never attend BPS. We’ll spend an enormous amount of money to make sure he gets the best education available at all levels including pre-k.

2 - the articles you posted still don’t support biker boy’s argument that pre-k is one of the best uses of taxpayer money. Sure, universal pre-k is beneficial. Anyone can understand that and I’m not arguing against it, but is it the ‘best’ use of a limited stream of money? Still waiting on the data.

3 - you’re a dick and your grand assumption making is childish. People like you are a reason why this country is so divided.

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Sure, universal pre-k is beneficial. Anyone can understand that and I’m not arguing against it

So we found a government program funded by taxpayers that even people like you agree is good for kids, and you're going to whine about $20 million dollars, or about .5% of the city budget? The BPD probably overruns that with fake overtime.

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Why are you putting words in my mouth? Kinopio made a statement and I asked for a citation because I find it hard to believe. I guess your ok with people making bold statements without any data to prove it. Very Fox-esq I must say. Are you watching Fox news right now? Because it sure sounds like it.

I pay more in taxes every year than you probably make so don’t give me this ‘even people like me like’ schtick.

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Based on your comment that you "pay more in taxes every year" than I make (I also have a masters in engineering btw) then yes, you are exactly my target for my "people like you" comment. People like you who constantly complain about taxes paying for social goods.

It's a trait pretty widespread in the engineering field, as you know.

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Show me, otherwise you’re just full of shit and wasting everyone’s time with your whataboutisms.

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Do you really want someone to post a complicated analysis of return on taxpayer dollar per city budget item, including pre-K? No, you don't.

Stop gaslighting. Kinopio posted an enthusiastic statement about pre-K programs and you just lazily trolled your way in, trying to undercut it.

Also, look up "whataboutism," it has no relation to what I've posted here.

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I thought he had read something somewhere or had something to base his statement off. I guess I was wrong.

Again with the troll comment. I can’t for the life of me understand how so many people on this site use that term without understanding what it actually means. Must be a bunch of geezers on here that heard it from their grandkids and now they just sling it around. Hint - you’re using it wrong.

Whataboutism - the technique or practice of responding to an accusation or difficult question by making a counteraccusation or raising a different issue.
Robo - where did I complain? Why are you putting words in my mouth?
Pete X - People like you who constantly complain about taxes paying for social goods.

Is that clear enough?

I never complained about paying taxes. I asked a very genuine, and I thought basic question, but a few people went way off the rails and started throwing around accusations about how I’m complaining about paying taxes. WTF?!!!! You guys are taking a page out of the Republican playbook and it’s not a good look.

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Nah dude, what you're doing is gaslighting and you're not smart enough to pull it off. Your sarcastic "citation please" now is: "I thought he had read something somewhere. " Give me a break, do you expect ANYONE to believe this?

You gaslight all over this site, and then you end by pretending you're not a right-winger. Believe me, we know. Everyone knows.

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how not to be a dick. Getting along with others and respecting them -- that's a social good, one I hope your son will at least learn.

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And see what your response is. I become a dick after someone starts making accusations that have no basis.

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2. While "best" is debatable the link shows that there is a net positive financial return to the city for each dollar spent on pre-K.

1. So if you believe in education and funding this program will also improve the city's budget and bottom line I'm not sure why you would fret so much about this funding.

3. I have to answer with a question. How do you survive in Boston if you're so thin-skinned that you can't take an indicated and light-hearted sarcastic barb?

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Dude has posted multiple times about how they're moving out of Boston, but somehow can't stop jumping in here to give their opinion about how terrible this place is.

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... he had already moved.

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Whether he's moved or not depends on the state of the current argument in which you find him.

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