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Developers unwrap plans for seven-story apartment building on Mission Hill

Rendering of 1558 Tremont St. proposal

Rendering by Embarc Studio.

The developers who bought two small buildings and a parking lot on Tremont Street from the order that runs Mission Church across the street have filed plans for a 139-unit residential building with 54 parking spaces - 44 set aside for the church and the remaining 10 for residents of the building - and room for a cafe.

Jason and Melanie Savage of Savage Real Estate say the building's two-level parking garage will have 14 charging stations for electric or plug-in vehicles.

They hope to begin two years of construction this fall.

The Savages bought the property from the Redemptorist Fathers for $3.7 million in 2016. The order runs Mission Church, more formally known as the Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

1558 Tremont St. filings and calendar.

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Comments

The first place I lived in Boston was 1500 Tremont St - 1987. $1000 for a 4 bedroom apartment. Drove all my stuff out from W MA in my 1981 canary yellow Plymouth Horizon. Never had a problem parking on the street. Good times.

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Voting closed 25

This development is much too dense for that corner. I realize no one cares about parking anymore but only ten spots seems ridiculous.

This developer rents mainly to undergrad students so can you imagine what the gridlock will be when 100 of those units turn over every September 1st??

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Voting closed 29

It’s on the green line and sept 1st is always crowded. Let’s focus on density to lower housing cost rather than to continue to cater to car owners in walking distance to transit stops.

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Voting closed 51

So you think the developer of this project removed parking spots to lower the cost of housing?? Lol, ok.

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Voting closed 21

I know most car owners think its a natural resource, but it turns out all that concrete and pavement actually costs money that has to be charged to the housing costs.

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Voting closed 11

The developers were trying to lower the cost of building the housing. That does not automatically translate to cheaper housing on the renter side of things, because it's complicated and obviously developers would prefer to build cheap housing and then charge a lot for it, but generally speaking, when something is cheap to make that often helps the overall market price go down. And since the "we" of anon's post isn't limited to purely market-based solutions, you can sort of step back and look at the bigger picture that if housing is expensive to make that certainly doesn't help make housing cheap. Someone has to pay for building the parking.

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Voting closed 27

Supply and demand, more housing supply equals less cost.

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Voting closed 9

Let's focus on denying these transients places to park. Deny them residential stickers. Zone every street in the city resident only.

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Voting closed 15

I have no dog in this hunt, but help me with the math: 44 spots for the church, which will use most of them what, two or three hours a week? and 10 spots for full time residents? Help ths make sense.

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Voting closed 25

Maybe the church would make some of their spots available for local residents to rent?

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Voting closed 20

Don't be fooled into thinking the developer is giving 44 spots to the church out of some kind gesture. They have no option but to do so as it was part of the agreement when they purchased the property.

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Voting closed 36

why do they need parking? Easy to get to Northeastern from there via subway, walking, or cycling.

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Voting closed 44

Believe it or not, not every undergrad student spends all day on campus. Some actually work or want to visit friends or go home...but it's really not the point here as ten spots for 139 units is a terrible ratio.

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Voting closed 24

There are plenty of ways to get around the city without a car. And when you do need one, there are plenty of options to use one temporarily without needing to own your own. Or plenty of ways to store your own personal car somewhere that isn't directly in front of where you live, especially if you're an undergrad student who doesn't need it every single day.

ten spots for 139 units is a terrible ratio

Not if the people who are moving in are aware that there isn't any parking, so people who need to have parking directly at their building decide not to bring their cars. Which again, is pretty plausible for a building catering to undergrads within close proximity to their college campus.

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Voting closed 51

Hundreds upon hundreds of out of state cars left all winter long on JP streets by these types. Why do you support that?

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Voting closed 18

1. I'd love to see a source that all of those out of state cars are left by college students living outside of JP - as someone who used to park my car with out of state plates on the street in Brighton, I can assure you that there are plenty of Boston residents with out of state plates parking in front of their own apartments.
2. if it is actually the issue, the solution is to request resident parking permits for your street. The form is right here: https://content.boston.gov/departments/parking-clerk/resident-parking-pe...
3. There's already plenty of student-focused buildings in Boston that don't have parking. Warren Towers has something like 1800 students and ZERO parking spaces for students, and the local streets still manage to have open parking spaces. The idea that every undergrad is showing up with a Winnebago that they have to store directly where they live just doesn't mesh with reality.

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Voting closed 19

Gonna be even worse when someone shovels one out and claims it for the rest of the winter.

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Voting closed 26

if I were an undergrad living in dense, urban Boston 5 minutes away from the green line, 7 minutes away from the orange line, and a 15 minute walk from campus, I would simply not bring a car into a dense, urban environment. and if I did want a car, I would simply rent an apartment with parking, rent a garage spot, or complain to everyone around me about how hard it is to find street parking in Boston.

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Voting closed 10

They use JP residential streets as their free long term parking lot and the City Hall hacks and the humps at BTD won't fix it.

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Voting closed 15

this developer actually has a long history of not renting to undergrad students.

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Voting closed 10

Imagine that 200+ more people will have a place to live and there might be a lot of traffic on September 1 which is notably 0.27% of the days of the year.

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Voting closed 28