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Area man claims feds owe him $300 billion as his birthright; makes more modest $5 million claim on Fidelity based on money order he self printed and sent in

McGuire's self-printed money order

McGuire's self-printed money order, featuring his trademarked name and crest, sent to Fidelity.

A man who follows a key tenet of the sovereign-citizen movement - that the government sets up secret bank accounts on people's births with which to enslave them - is suing the federal government to get the $300 billion he claims it owes him as his birthright and because its "silence" in answering any of his hundreds of pages of notarized dunning demands proves its "acquiescence" to his request.

Nathan McGuire also wants $5 million from Fidelity Investments for the self-printed money order he sent to the company, which the company did not then send back, and is seeking roughly $16 million from the state Department of Revenue, for reasons that a reporter could not quickly glean from his filings, but which might stem from the secret bank account he claims the state set up for him when he was born - or maybe the child-support payments the state once claimed he was refusing to pay, or maybe something else, it can be hard to tell from his lawsuit, which consists of long strings of words that, individually, have meaning, but which when strung together create impenetrable assertions and phrases difficult for a layperson to grasp.

McGuire, or as he defines himself, the Sole Contributing Grantor and Beneficial Owner of the COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS NATHAN ALIAH MCGUIRE agency - the secret bank account he alleges the state set up for him at his birth - initially sued the federal government, Fidelity and the state in Suffolk Superior Court in May.

The US Department of the Treasury, however, moved yesterday to have the case transferred to US federal court in Boston - where a judge last year rejected McGuire's earlier attempt to collect the $16 million he claims the state owes him.

Neither the feds nor the state have yet to answer McGuire's claims that his birth on April 19, 1977, as he says is recorded at the state Registry of Vital Records and Statistics office at 150 Mt. Vernon St. in Dorchester, led to the state setting up the secret bank account that he wants the funds from.

McGuire's trademark

However, in a motion filed in Suffolk Superior Court, Fidelity asked for dismissal of what it called the "sprawling and largely incomprehensible" claim against it, that, like the federal claim, is based on McGuire's theory that Fidelity owes him the money because it never told him it was not accepting the demand - and, in the company's case, a self-printed money order featuring McGuire's trademarked name and crest consisting of two black panthers facing each other over a crossed key and arrows.

In support of these claims, Plaintiff attaches hundreds of pages of exhibits that are replete with purported agreements and certificates - fabricated by Plaintiff - that have no legal authority.

The company says the judge should throw out the case with prejudice - since it's so ludicrous.

Reading the Complaint in a light most favorable to Plaintiff, it alleges that Plaintiff sent a self-authored "Security and Control Agreement" to Fidelity along with self-authored "Money Order" for $5 million. By Plaintiff's logic, Fidelity "had every right to not accept the contract," but "silence constitutes acceptance and Petitioner is owed performance." In other words, Plaintiff asserts that Fidelity owes him $5 million under a unilateral contract and a facially fraudulent money order that Fidelity neither accepted nor deposited. Plaintiff's fraud should not be countananced.

That's just not how the law works - people and companies don't become subject to a contract they didn't ask for and didn't agree to - Fidelity argues.

McGuire says he first made his demand on the federal government to fork over his $300 billion in a UCC filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State's office on April 9, 2019, in which he identified himself as Nathan Aliah McGuire, Creditor, Settlor, Surety, Private Banker and Authorized Signatory, for "NATHAN ALIAH MCGUIRE©™", ARTIFICIAL ENTITY, U.S. CORPORATE VESSEL, PRIVATE CITIZEN, TRUST, and PRIVATE BANKING ENTITY.

He says that document gave the federal government three days to answer his demand and 30 days to file "certified, authenticated documents of the laws that rebut these claims point by point" - but to keep in mind that he is a "Private People of Posterity, a Original Living Personam Sojurn, in fact, NOT a 14th amendment citizen or surety within" and to remember that "IGNORANCE OF THE LAW IS NO EXCUSE!"

McGuire's complete complaint (800k PDF).
Fidelity's memorandum on dismissing the case (197k PDF).
McGuire's UCC filing (2.9M PDF).


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Comments

fuckwits, or do they just think everyone else is?

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Yes

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The sad truth about this folks is that the tend to come from minor errors either on their part or someone else, a misunderstanding about what being a 1099 contractor means or a miscalculation on how a child support payment works. This often finds them on tax day owing far more then they expected and they start digging, initially using fairly legal methods to delay paying the tax and then more and more outlandish methods until the IRS or whoever starts with the leins and levies and the newly minted tax protester start diving into the SovCit c
Kool-aid. It's depressing to watch when you see it happening in real time.

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I have some otherwise bright friends who believe in the power of ritual magic. This strikes me as a very similar phenomenon: to an unsophisticated eye, the esoteric gobbledygook in the Lesser Key Of Solomon probably resembles the esoteric gobbledygook in a contract law textbook.

The key difference is, courts actually do something because they're attached to this whole bulky enforcement apparatus made of cops and jails and fines and so on.

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There is a whole book on it

Sovereign Citizens: A Psychological and Criminological Analysis [1st ed.]
Christine M. Sarteschi Chatham University Pittsburgh, PA, USA (Associate Professor of Social Work and Criminology.)
Series Editor Vincent B. Van Hasselt, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA
ISBN 978-3-030-45851-5
Published: 23 July 2020
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45851-5

This brief serves to educate readers about the sovereign citizen movement, presenting relevant case studies and offering suggestions for measures to address problems caused by this movement. Sovereign citizens are considered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to be a prominent domestic terrorist threat in the United States, and are broadly defined as a loosely-afflicted anti-government group who believes that the United States government and its laws are invalid and fraudulent. Because they consider themselves to be immune to the consequences of American law, members identifying with this group often engage in criminal activities such as tax fraud, “paper terrorism”, and in more extreme cases, attempted murder or other acts of violence. Sovereign Citizens is one of the first scholarly works to explicitly focus on the sovereign citizen movement by explaining the movement’s origin, interactions with the criminal justice system, and ideology.

https://dokumen.pub/sovereign-citizens-a-psychological-and-criminologica...

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It's a condition of mental divergence. I find myself on the planet Ogo, part of an intellectual elite, preparing to subjugate the barbarian hordes on Pluto. But even though this is a totally convincing reality for me in every way, nevertheless Ogo is actually a construct of my psyche. I am mentally divergent, in that I am escaping certain unnamed realities that plague my life here. When I stop going there, I will be well. Are you also divergent, friend?

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12 Monkeys was a great movie. I haven't seen it in a while and now my mind has melded that character with Neal degrasse Tyson. It seems like a natural fit.

gr

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None of these arguments have ever worked, out of the thousands of times they've been tried, but who knows, luck might be with McGuire...pardon, I mean, MCGUIRE.

My theory, personally, is that the whole sovereign citizen idea was first thought up by a cartel of popcorn manufacturers, to boost sales.

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Not all countries are as concerned about the consistency of law. Surf the Internet long enough and you hear stories about how one guy put one over on the credit card company by sending them altered an altered T&C statement, folks walking on fraud charges because they failed to succeed at closing the deal, etc. Magical thinking worked for them, typically in former Soviet states, so why shouldn't it for them?

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I remember the credit card T&C guy (https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2013/08/14/man-who-outwitted-bank-ends-70...), one Dmitry Agarkov of Voronezh, Russia. It's not 100% clear, and I'm not a Russian lawyer, but the story does say:

The bank employees approved his contract without noticing the changes

...and to me, the fact that a human working for the bank reviewed and approved the contract makes that less silly than the instant case. Presumably they assumed it was identical to the other jillion contracts they reviewed that week, but it wasn't Agarkov's fault that they were careless and signed a contract without reading it thoroughly.

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Someone in authority should have the right to just tell this guy to, "Get help" and STFU.

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Or just STFU.

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I'll give him this, that crest looks pretty sharp. Wonder if I can get him to do one with my family motto, "Quid Spectas?" ("What are you looking at?"), and then pay him with some money I create using a crayon and an old CVS receipt.

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That authority figure would be the judge, and dismissing the case with prejudice, as has been requested, is how a court says "STFU". It might not take much time for a judge to decide to do so, but they still have to take that little bit of time, if only to avoid giving dude grounds for appeal.

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I think the second case in Federal Court if decided with prejudice will accomplish exactly this.

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He's owed $300 billion, and he's ONLY seeking $5 million. I think he's being pretty reasonable.

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Honestly I bet he'd settle for $3.5 million and the zeppelin the Air Force ordered for him upon his birth.

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He wants $300 billion from the feds, another $16 million from the state AND $5 million from Fidelity.

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If he is not a citizen of this country, how can he claim his super secret bonkers bank account money?

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You reproduced a copy of his crest, with the panthers, key, and arrows.

Isn't that a trademark violation?

He is known to be litigious abut such things.

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is put "no copyright intended" under it, the magical phrase employed by the wise people of Youtubia.

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Or point out that he really should be suing ADAM GAFFIN (TM).

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I always feel sad when I see these kinds of antics. Either this person has no one who cares about them, or they'd have done an intervention...or they do, and their loved ones have tried, and they haven't succeeded, and then I feel sad for their loved ones.

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There is a child(ren) out there who have to have him attend school events.

Perfectly normal for kids to go through a phase of being embarrassed to be seen in public with their parents bit this ... this is just the litigious side of him

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...I'd be thoroughly depressed and have therapy bills up the wazoo.

Sorry, no sympathy here. I'll save it for people that truly need help.

Gotta say, he's creative.

I'm curious, though: Who does he vote for? RFK Jr.? Shiva?

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His ilk claim the legal system has no jurisdiction over him as a sovereign citizen...so don't try to arrest him or enforce traffic laws on him...but when there's anywhere between $5M and $300B on the line...suddenly the courts have some use.

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when it's old enough to drink.

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To accurately judge the merits of his case I would need to see his hands.

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It's a weird double standard. They claim that they aren't subject to the law because they didn't explicitly agree to it. But if it's something they want you or the government to do, and you didn't say "no" in triplicate in red ink within thirty days, you have to comply.

But hey, if he gets $300 billion just for existing, so do I, so does everyone here. Congratulations, the dollar is now completely worthless, because where will you spend it? Zimbabwean banknotes, anyone?

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He'll settle for court costs.
Or one MILLION dollars.

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How can you sue something you don't recognize as legitimate? The mere act of filing the suit acknowledges the other party to be a legitimately constituted entity that can be sued.

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They only have value because the federal government says they have value, and that government has an army to back up that assertion. So if you believe the government is illegitimate, then so is its currency.

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Both of you just now put more thought into this than McGuire ever did in his life.

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This is gorgeously phrased, Adam: "or maybe the child-support payments the state once claimed he was refusing to pay, or maybe something else, it can be hard to tell from his lawsuit, which consists of long strings of words that, individually, have meaning, but which when strung together create impenetrable assertions and phrases difficult for a layperson to grasp."

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green ideas sleep furiously."

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Haven't read the article yet but that headline was one hell of a ride.

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As hobbies go, his doesn't seem particularly fulfilling to my tastes, but to each his own, I guess.

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If you live in Suffolk County, your taxes are paying for the court's time that McGuire is wasting. Judges get paid less than you might guess, but they do get paid.

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