Hey, there! Log in / Register

Citizen complaint of the day: Crosswalks aren't for truck parking

Artois truck in a crosswalk in Charlestown

A disgusted citizen filed a 311 report this morning about the beer truck whose driver decided the best place to park it for deliveries is in a crosswalk on Main Street in Charlestown:

We need this crosswalk clear. Can someone in government please find a solution to this problem? There is no enforcement from Boston Transportation Dept. They do not enforce the constant illegal parking by delivery trucks in Charlestown.

Neighborhoods: 
Topics: 


Ad:


Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

A lot of companies have a company policy of encouraging divers to park illegally and then pay the fine. In response to this the city should increase the cost of fines for company vehicles considerably and fine the businesses they are delivering to as well encourage them to tell their delivery drivers not to do it instead of benefiting from it when they do.

up
Voting closed 2

This particular cranky person literally posts every day and has been for years...

The trucks won't fit into the parking lot, so where are they to go to accommodate the poster's sensitivities?

up
Voting closed 1

Somewhere that parking is allowed.

up
Voting closed 2

And if there isn't any? Just shut the store down because deliveries are impossible? This person chose to live in cramped Charlestown not suburbia with a spacious parking lot for every store. This is city living.

up
Voting closed 1

It's established law that you can do anything you want so long as you justify it to yourself.

/s

up
Voting closed 2

The driver did pretty well on this one.

Either he pollutes the air with exhaust and noise for 3 and half hours looping around that bizarro intersection until commercial parking opens up.

OR he chooses a section of road that has sidewalk cutouts both in front and behind him that enter 7-11.

Either way, this particular person would file a complaint either way.

up
Voting closed 1

Why not park in front of one of the curb cuts? That would be enough space for the truck, without blocking the cross walk. But then, we can't have that, because it might inconvenience drivers and the store's customers, both of which matter more in this society than pedestrians. Yeah, the driver had other options, but chose to do the thing that harmed the most vulnerable, rather than something else.

up
Voting closed 2

.

up
Voting closed 1

Because the amount of excuses I hear about why they keep running red lights is laughable.

up
Voting closed 1

Citation please
By robo on Sun, 06/11/2023 - 10:24am.

I’d wager a lot of money the percent of bikers breaking laws vs cars breaking laws is massively leaning bikers.

Not deflecting
By robo on Wed, 11/02/2022 - 12:05pm.

Trying to provide some focus here. Yes, agree - all rules of the road need to be followed.

First link is a Danish study. You seriously think you can equate American cyclists and Danish cyclist? I’ve never met a more entitled group as American city cyclists.

Second link says drivers and cyclists break road rules equally. Proves my point.

Quoted article that you agreed with:
https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/01/03/study-cyclists-dont-break-traffic...

The results do not support the assumption that cyclists are reckless rule-breakers.

According to the study, bicyclists were in compliance with traffic laws 88 percent of the time during the day and 87 percent of the time at night. The observed compliance rate for drivers who interacted with participants was slightly lower, at 85 percent during the day. (There weren’t enough nighttime driver observations to report a compliance rate.)

up
Voting closed 3

Since you love links, I’ll post one that is relevant from myself.

I absolutely would not defend that behavior and have said so in the past. I would fully support the driver receiving a massive fine and loss of license. You on the other hand, defend bikes running red lights because they cause less damage if something were to happen.

up
Voting closed 0

But your comments from previous threads are very relevant, let me break it down into smaller bites for you.

By BostonDog

It's established law that you can do anything you want so long as you justify it to yourself.

By robo

I think they teach this to bicyclists.

By me!

Motorists too Robbie, based on your own words!

According to the study, bicyclists were in compliance with traffic laws 88 percent of the time during the day and 87 percent of the time at night. The observed compliance rate for drivers who interacted with participants was slightly lower, at 85 percent during the day

You agreed with that data showing the law breaking between cyclists and motorists is about the same but I was worried you forgot about that original point because you keep running away from it thread after thread and still parrot points like the one below.

By robo

I’d wager a lot of money the percent of bikers breaking laws vs cars breaking laws is massively leaning bikers.

That would be a losing wager!

up
Voting closed 2

Where anytime someone writes the word "bike" it automatically hides that post and all subsequent responses.

up
Voting closed 2

Please add space saver to this list.

up
Voting closed 0

Nailed it!

up
Voting closed 2

Will be here soon insisting that rideshare drivers do all commercial deliveries in the city.

up
Voting closed 1

The trucks won't fit into the parking lot, so where are they to go to accommodate the poster's sensitivities?

They are to go someplace where they're not blocking the crosswalk. If it is impossible to deliver beer to that store using that truck without blocking the crosswalk, then find some other way to deliver beer to the store.

up
Voting closed 2

Maybe I'm missing something, but it looks like there's definitely space there if you're willing to temporarily block some parking spaces. You might need to coordinate with the business owner to make sure the lot isn't full when you need to do a delivery, but hey, that's an organizational problem, not a physical impossibility.

up
Voting closed 1

.

up
Voting closed 1

That beer truck is delivering to Charlestown Liquors, which is not in that parking lot.

So the beer truck is not parking/taking up spaces to a business which it is not delivering to.

There is a “delivery trucks” parking zone ahead, however when i went by this morning, regular cars were parked in it illegally.

So it’s the truck drivers fault, but many others as well.

up
Voting closed 2

I don't really understand...it is ok to park illegally blocking the crosswalk, but it's not ok to park illegally in the 7-11's parking lot? Why exactly? Because the 7-11 might complain? People trying to not get run over crossing the street also might complain. People who are in a wheelchair or with a stroller who literally can't even cross might complain.

Or is the problem that the 7-11 might tow the illegally parked truck? I would argue the city should do that too, so what's the difference?

There is honestly no excuse for a truck this size to be used for beverage deliveries in the city. If you go to Europe, you will almost never see trucks this size in the city unless they are delivering construction materials. This truck is probably dropping off one pallet of beer or less to this particular store, and that could easily fit in a van.

up
Voting closed 0

One option is to choose a truck that fits the legal parking options where your deliveries are.

Another is to move further forward or back so you aren't blocking the crosswalk.

up
Voting closed 2

Not excusing the truck here... but beer is heavy and you need a decent sized truck to handle the load. This is a fairly large box truck, so a shorter truck could do it, but don't even think about vans.

up
Voting closed 1

Why not vans? People use vans all over the world to deliver beverages. They have many advantages, but I assume the "problem" is that their smaller size means the driver needs to return to base more often to get more cargo, which is InEfFiCiEnT~!!`1 and would raise delivery prices a little bit. Am I missing something? Because that seems like the definition of something market forces could sort out.

up
Voting closed 2

They could diagonal a truck into that parking lot EASY. Might temporarily lose some parking spaces but I'm sure the customers will be happy to accommodate.

up
Voting closed 2

That parking lot is for 7-11 and H&R Block. This delivery truck is delivering beer to Charlestown Liquors, which you cannot see in the photo.

Charlestown liquors does not have a parking lot, however there is a delivery zone next to it (which was filled with cars parked illegally).

This delivery truck could not use the parking lot that everyone on here seems to think they should use.

up
Voting closed 1

Because they park and walk to your homes from 2 miles away....

Got it!

up
Voting closed 0

It somehow managed to get both the truck and the nearly empty parking lot clearly into one photo, despite the fact that they're 2 miles away from each other!

Just incredible what technology can do these days.

up
Voting closed 1

Blocked by the truck in the photo and no truck of this size can take a right hand turn out of the parking lot because residential parking.

Don't even play with me on the idea of smaller vans/delivery vehicles

up
Voting closed 2

But why not?

up
Voting closed 1

Walking up the steps of the Monument to take a photo lol in a daily basis

up
Voting closed 2

I commute past here all the time and this truck blocking these crosswalks and the sight lines is very much a public safety hazard that needs to be addressed.

up
Voting closed 1

At it again!

up
Voting closed 2

How about the mouth of either end of the parking lot. Why do pedestrians have to hazard crossing the road around this truck instead of the drivers lose access to the 7-11 until the delivery is completed?

How about turning 90 degrees and parking along the curb of the triangle in front of the fountain out of the way of the crosswalks?

How about the NO PARKING EXCEPT COMMERCIAL VEHICLES 7A-4P LITERALLY ACROSS THE FUCKING STREET FROM WHERE HE IS:
https://goo.gl/maps/E6mQdMF8Qqg9KRP78

up
Voting closed 2

No way that huge truck fits in it, even if no one is parked in it. Not quite the A-ha moment you think it is.

up
Voting closed 2

To get a smaller truck. Vehicles this size do not belong on city streets for a multitude of reasons.

up
Voting closed 2

...

up
Voting closed 0

Seriously. Buses? They move on quickly and use bus stops.

Has your time in the country led you to forget what the city is like?

This is bullshit.

up
Voting closed 2

Calm down, swrls.
Poster ranted about vehicle size in the city while busses are just as large and have to negotiate corners, etc.
That's all.

up
Voting closed 2

No need for you label your posts as bullshit, Swirls - that's taken as established.

up
Voting closed 2

It could be said to some of those giant double decker private tour buses. They are the size of semis and as tall if not taller. Earth shakers.

up
Voting closed 2

Then they shouldn't be delivering there with a semi.

up
Voting closed 2

...

up
Voting closed 2

...all edge, no point.

up
Voting closed 1

That's the point. Was it that hard to understand?

up
Voting closed 2

From the looks of the picture either in front of or behind the crosswalk. I'm not from Charlestown. Anyone here from Charlestown that knows this area?

up
Voting closed 2

To me it looks like the front of the truck is on one side of the crosswalk and the rear of the truck is to the other side and the middle of the truck is very much blocking the crosswalk.

up
Voting closed 2

My question should be read as why is any of the truck in the crosswalk? Could he have parked on either side of the crosswalk without blocking it? Maybe a Charlestown resident can clear this up for me.

up
Voting closed 2

There is a similar situation on West Broadway in South Boston. Delivery trucks are double parked along the stretch between F Street and Dorchester Street. A few years back, there was a couple of designated Loading Zones, which worked well. Then came outdoor dining. The seating is in the Loading Zones.
These guys have no choice but to park in crosswalks or double park. I blame the city for creating this situation.

up
Voting closed 1

These guys have no choice but to park in crosswalks or double park.

That's completely false. They have the choice to say "I'm not making a delivery to that address because there's no place to park my truck."

up
Voting closed 2

"We'll use a smaller vehicle to make deliveries to those addresses to make sure that there's a place to park them".

up
Voting closed 1

You have got strong board member vibes here.

Ever run a stop sign / red light? Even in a car?

Ever go above the speed limit?

Ever jaywalk?

Ever not speak up to the T Ambassador when they fare gate is open and they are not collecting fares?

Ever cheat on your taxes, even just a little bit?

Lighten up for christsakes.

up
Voting closed 0

apply that laissez faire to cyclists some time.

up
Voting closed 0

I will.

No promises.

up
Voting closed 2

Nope
By John Costello on Fri, 09/02/2022 - 11:58am.

Just plain old dickery.

This is the Camberville late 20 something version of illegally dirt biking where they are expressly prohibited.

up
Voting closed 1

between you or I jaywalking, vs a corporation knowingly and regularly breaking the law because it saves them a few dollars.

up
Voting closed 0

to keep requesting that their suppliers make deliveries in sensible ways with appropriately trained drivers and adequate vehicles. smaller delivery vehicles exist, businesses need to demand that they be used.

up
Voting closed 1

Think for a minute what would happen if a driver refused to make a delivery. They would get fired. If the delivery company made the decision to stop delivering, they would lose the business in favor of a competitor. If enough delivery companies did that, the store owner could decide they had enough with the hassles of getting stuff delivered, and close up shop, to sell the property for fancy condos or life sciences. Or in a poor neighborhood, creating a vacant storefront.

Then people in the neighborhood would lose the benefit of having a store nearby. Residents with cars could drive to a bigger store with parking, probably a big chain (yes, I know this particular example is a 7-Eleven with a small parking lot), at the expense of creating more traffic, pollution, and risk of accidents. Residents without cars would be out of luck.

A better solution would be for city transportation officials to do their job and ensure the streets are set up so everyone can use them safely, including pedestrians and delivery trucks.

up
Voting closed 3

A better solution would be for city transportation officials to do their job and ensure the streets are set up so everyone can use them safely, including pedestrians and delivery trucks.

Thats gonna require some reduction in parking spots and you can look to the temper tantrum being through in West Rox to see how challenging a task that is.

up
Voting closed 1

Not really. The city could take 4 spaces for an expanded loading zone at the local grocery store and it would go just fine.

up
Voting closed 0

Please supply a citation on that.

Your car-brained speculation passing itself off as a social justice issue is not the same as actual research.

up
Voting closed 1

Please explain how my concern for supporting food stores in walking distance of residential areas, rather than big parking lot supermarkets at the edge of town, is car-brained.

This example was a beer truck, but the issue is identical for food delivery trucks. If truck drivers refuse to make deliveries because there's no legal loading spot as an earlier poster suggested, and the city makes no effort to make loading zones available, stores in older neighborhoods without off-street loading docks can't survive.

up
Voting closed 1

This happens a lot in Dorchester too. My question is why are they doing deliveries during rush hour? That makes it so much worse.

Recently, they proposed city owned parking lots in Dorchester to prevent double parking. That is such a joke since they rarely actually block another car. If people are too selfish to pull to the curb, what makes you think they would pull into a parking lot?

up
Voting closed 1

I don’t understand all the cars I see, mostly Ubers, double parked next to an empty parking space. That is the height of selfish laziness.

up
Voting closed 1

Seriously?
There are only so many hours in the day. So, according to you:
- can't deliver 'til well after 9
- can't deliver from 4 'til 6 or 6:30
- can't deliver during lunch because the driver takes lunch or a lot of places don't let you. So, there's a few more hours.

That leaves about 5 hours out of a driver's 8-hour shift.
Reality is a bitch, huh?

up
Voting closed 2

City streets don't clog up until after 7am. And some deliveries have actual parking.

up
Voting closed 3

Hahahaha! Thanks, I needed that.

up
Voting closed 0

again, how would you know.

up
Voting closed 2

Commuted to Kendall from
Brighton for 9 years, then Seaport to Somerville for 2 years then Dorchester to Somerville for 3 years.

Your turn because you clearly have never driven a mile in Boston if you think the streets are not congested before 7am.

up
Voting closed 1

… be in a car to know what congestion is and when it happens? I’ve driven many a mile in Boston but I can also just open my bedroom window and hear it too.

up
Voting closed 2

Boston: We want to be business friendly

Also Boston: We are going to make it as hard as possible to get deliveries.

And yes. I know crosswalks are important. I use them myself, many times per day. But I also frequent stores that… receive deliveries. And I know delivering in small vans or only at specific hours is inefficient (read: expensive). At times something’s got to give. We can all adapt.

up
Voting closed 2

With all due respect, I am tired of adapting. I do not drive. I chose to live in a city for that reason. I am sick and tired of having to walk into streets (this is a general rant, not exclusively applied to this particular image) and around giant trucks, putting myself at the mercy of drivers who don't even bother looking before whipping around them.

up
Voting closed 2

Boston: We are going to make it easier to get deliveries by removing some parking spaces and making delivery/loading zones.

Motorists: No, not like that!

up
Voting closed 3

Duh...they certainly are.

up
Voting closed 2

the delivery is likely for the liquor store across the street, that’s why the truck isn’t parked in the lot that’s for the 7-11. There is a loading zone just past the crosswalk on the left, but since you can’t see it in the photo, no way to know if there was another vehicle taking up that space.

up
Voting closed 1

So, this truck is most likely making a delivery to Charlestown Liquors. Looking at the street view, there's commercial parking right next to to store. Parking there would be, in the most literal sense, the easiest way to make deliveries.

But here's the thing, if you clicked on the link, you'll see that the Google car caught a passenger car parked in the commercial spot. Going back 7 years, there are cars parked in the spot in 5 views, with a telephone company van one year and it empty only one time. The streets there are narrow, so no double parking. Sadly, this is most likely the only spot the guy could find to make his delivery.

Yes, the truck shouldn't be there, and the reality is that by the time anyone who could give a ticket got there the truck would be gone, but perhaps BTD might want to keep an eye on the commercial spots.

up
Voting closed 2

And you didn't want to mention the difficulty of emergency vehicles getting by?

Even in OPs image, it seems a little tight if not impossible for those larger vehicles to pass in an emergency.

up
Voting closed 2

Because if you did, you'd know that emergency responders would have a much worse time of it if the truck was blocking Warren Street rather than Main Street. BFD would only be taking Main Street returning from a call, and if push came to shove they could go over to Rutherford Ave. to get back to the station. So it seems like you are saying that the truck driver did a public service, no?

But thanks for your concern.

up
Voting closed 1

Very strange that your solution here is to redirect the fire engines to Warren "if push came to shove."

What if there was a call on Main St? You know that emergency responders would have a much easier time of it if there were no trucks illegally parked, right?

And why only mention BFD but ignore the ambulances?

up
Voting closed 2

To get from the closest fire station to this location, the only way is Warren Street. If they took Main Street, they would be going the wrong way down the street. Only in your mind would this make sense.

Same with ambulances. The best way to MGH would be to go over the Prison Point Bridge. In any event, an ambulance could get by this truck.

Yes, it would be an easier time of the truck wasn't forced to do this, but again, someone parked in the commercial spots that were posted as such so the truck wouldn't have to block the crosswalk, which, if you cared about pedestrians, would be your concern.

up
Voting closed 2

You've carefully muddy the waters here, so lets break down what you said:

BFD would only be taking Main Street returning from a call

Now you've pivoted to BFD coming FROM the station, not returning from a call. Crafty but I see right through it!

Emergency vehicles certainly would have to go down Main Street if the emergency was on Main St. Getting to MGH is of course another story

Why do you think I don't care about pedestrians?

up
Voting closed 1

It's only commercial parking 7A-4P and only M-F and not on holidays.

Google Street View tells you the month and year...that's not enough to tell you if what you're seeing involves illegal parking or not.

up
Voting closed 2

I'll admit that.

That said, again, the commercial space is tailor made for deliveries to the liquor store. I'd take any bet that it was occupied when the delivery took place.

up
Voting closed 2

If I were driving the Googlemobile, I'd avoid places like Charlestown during the day on weekdays.

up
Voting closed 0

Yeh, like. Moving to Monument Ave complaining about the tourist walking around. moving to training field and composing about dogs. moving by the community ice rink and complaint about kids making noise. i mean getting a condo/apartment above a Starbucks next to liquor store and across from a 7/11 and some feet from a strip mall and complaining about deliveries. God Bless america if you ain’t happy move. Most of us found Nirvana here in Charlestown. we got just the right balance of business here without it being a problem.

up
Voting closed 1

As a commuting cyclist, the easiest solution is to put a few BTD folks on bicycles and challenge them to ride around the city to ticket.

Not only will they cover my ground, but they'll understand firsthand the dangerous consequences of a total lack of traffic enforcement is to the city. To be clear, I don't put this totally on the BTD. The Boston Police Department, by their own admission, has wholly stopped enforcing all but the most egregious moving violations all while continuing to be the only department in the city with an unlimited budget.

up
Voting closed 2

Coffee table book of Best of Motor Vehicle Operation in Boston would have this on the cover. Forget the Internet memes. Publication of a large glossy color photo coffee table book is worthy.

up
Voting closed 0

Just detour around it. Some people have too much time on their hands

up
Voting closed 2