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Citizen complaint of the day: It's no raccoon, but weasel in Franklin Park might be rabid, too

White weasel in Franklin Park, possibly rabid

Possible weasel of Caerbannog, with a vicious streak a mile wide, on a Franklin Park path.

A concerned citizen filed a 311 complaint about a white weasel with no fear on the Forest Hills Street side of Franklin Park this evening:

Rabid white weasel at Franklin park. Chased after me and my dog and was not bothered by my dog’s barking and growling.

Earlier:
Rabid raccoons popping up in Boston; five so far.

Neighborhoods: 


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Comments

I’m pretty sure I just saw a rabid white weasel on TV

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I've heard that weasels can just be like that sometimes, no rabies involved. (Maybe defending a burrow?)

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Somebody’s escaped pet

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They are not exactly known for being friendly

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They're cute, but they are fierce. If they're hungry or determined enough, they will take on much larger animals or groups of animals. I have seen a few get into friends' poultry enclosures. One weasel vs twenty chickens is not as lopsided a fight as you'd think.

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It’s doing the Dwarf Nebula Processional March.

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the Eric Dolphy Memorial Barbecue.

And keep your mamas away from those guitars.

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It was chasing your dog, not you. Hungry weasel looking for a quick meal.

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Sad. Abandoned ferret.

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Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals. Except the weasel.

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It must be a relative of the Rabbit of Caerbannog.

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It was just mean.

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Our local police report is filled with entries of people seeing a wild animal, always with the comment "possibly rabid". These judgements are meaningless and I believe are simply to raise attention and priority to their entry.

Anyways, cool looking animal.

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Technically not wrong, any mammal is "possibly" rabid in the same way I might "possibly" be President someday. (In both cases, let's hope not.)

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Who would you bet on?

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There's only one way to find out: try it. Whichever one loses, we win.

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It depends on how many of each there are. Doesn't take too many weasels to chew through all the wiring harnesses and brake lines on a dirtbike. On the other hand, if the bikes are already moving, the weasels might not have the vertical jump to pull this off.

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Maybe a pet ferret, that could explain the behavior.

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Could that be someone’s escaped pet ferret? Would explain confidence.

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That looks a lot more like a white ferret (domesticated species predating domesticated cats) than a weasel, and the reason that it might be relatively unafraid is that it was raised with humans and dogs.

I hope that Animal Control can catch it.

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An aggressive wild animal is not automatically rabid. Anyone who has experienced an animal actually in the stages of rabies where they are aggressive will tell you it is not like normal animal aggression. There is a weird zombie-like quality to it.

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