Hey, there! Log in / Register

City, state, union all knew Patrick Rose was raping children, yet did nothing to stop him as he climbed to become police union president, suit charges

Update: Case dismissed (decision linked at bottom of story).

Two people who lived with Patrick Rose as children who say he raped them repeatedly for several years and who say they were then shunted aside by fellow cops and officials even after they kept telling their stories today sued the city of Boston, the Boston Police Department, former BPD Commissioner Paul Evans, the Boston Police Patrolman's Association, Rose's successor as union president, several BPD supervisors and the state Department of Children and Families.

In their suit, filed in US District Court in Boston, the two, identified as John Doe and Jane Doe, along with the woman's husband, identified as James Doe, allege that for more than two decades, Rose got away with raping children - many of them, including them, his own relatives and many of them in his own home in West Roxbury - as BPD decided to ignore their complaints and internal-affairs investigations and to even reinstate Rose as a cop after the police union complained. The suit also alleges that DCF's predecessor agency did nothing even after being alerted about the abuse because Rose was a cop.

The suit identifies the two victims as the children of Rose's wife, Frances; one of their allegations:

DCF and DCF Defendants failed to remove John Doe and Jane Doe from the custody of Rose.

Rose pleaded guilty to multiple counts of child rape and related offenses last year and was sentenced to 10 to 13 years in prison.

John Doe alleges Rose abused him from the time he was 8 - in 1990 - until he was 14. He charges that when he was 12, in 1993, he went to police, who arrested Rose for indecent assault and battery on a child and placed him on administrative leave. Internal Affairs concluded Rose was a child rapist, as did DCF. But then Commissioner Paul Evans did not fire Rose, in fact, he ordered him reinstated after the BPPA complained, the suit says.

For the next 23 years, Rose worked as a police officer rising through the ranks of the BPD and the union, all the while continuing to sexually abuse John Doe. Due to the complete failure of the BPD and DCF, Rose was not terminated from the police department, and avoided criminal charges, incarceration, restraining orders, therapy, and child custody restrictions. Because the BPD and DCF did nothing, Rose was emboldened and escalated his abuse against John Doe and Jane Doe and extended the abuse to additional child victims.

The lawsuit alleges that some of the interviews other officers did of the children was in front of the Rose home, sometimes with Frances Rose present. And they charge BPD continued to cover for Rose even as late as 2021, three years after he was defeated in a bid to stay union president and he retired from the force, when the charges surfaced again.

In 2021, [Paul] Evans and [Internal Affairs Superintendent in Chief Anne Marie] Doherty continued their campaign to chill John Doe and Jane Doe’s substantive and procedural due process rights under the Fourteenth Amendment by falsely representing to the public that “they did a complete and thorough investigation” and that “their hands were tied.”

The suit seeks damages, to be determined at trial. More immediately, the three plaintiffs are asking a judge to attach Rose's house and other property to ensure there is at least $1 million on hand "as security for the judgement the Plaintiffs expect to recover."

Neighborhoods: 
Topics: 
Free tagging: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Complete complaint759.67 KB
PDF icon Ruling dismissing the suit295.22 KB


Ad:


Like the job UHub is doing? Consider a contribution. Thanks!

Comments

They all knew. They all protected the abuser. Day of reckoning is here.

up
Voting closed 1

The people who knew and looked the other way are long retired and collecting a pension or have moved onto better paying private jobs. Few of them will face any hardships.

The lawsuit has merits and the victims deserve something for their suffering. But that settlement will come out of public funds that could otherwise be used for things that help everyone in the city.

So not only did the defendants hurt the victims directly, they've also indirectly hurt the taxpayers and residents of the city and state. And with few exceptions, they'll face no consequences.

Edit: Fixed a big typo.

up
Voting closed 0

So not only did the plaintiffs hurt the victims directly, they've also indirectly hurt the taxpayers and residents of the city and state.

The plaintiffs ARE the victims. Are you really adding insult to injury by saying it's wrong for them to sue?

up
Voting closed 1

And fixed my error. Sorry.

up
Voting closed 2

The people who chose to ignore Rose can be made to feel very unwelcome in any place they visit. Even in grocery stores. Sometimes shunning is the only reckoning. But it is something.

up
Voting closed 2

Justice for Sean Gannon and may He Rest in Peace. He was a former Boston Cop who was reprimanded after reporting an officer with a history of framing Black youths and abusing kids. This case, along with the Patrick Rose case, serves as to why corruption corrodes the Boston Police Department still to this day.

up
Voting closed 2

“And they charge BPD continued to cover for Rose even as late as 2021, three years after he was defeated in a bid to stay union president and he retired from the force, when the charges surfaced again.”

Get rid of everyone involved with this rot.

up
Voting closed 1

.

up
Voting closed 1

The whole fucking orchard was bad

up
Voting closed 1

.

up
Voting closed 2

I can't remember the whole aphorism... it's "One bad apple has no effect whatsoever on the rest of the bunch," right?

up
Voting closed 2

Corrupt cops: one bad apple ... move along!
Mass shootings: forget that well organized militia shit - we can't use it

up
Voting closed 2

So the facts are out there for anyone who chooses to dig.

But is it necessary to have the sentence above the first quote box, as well as the contents of that box?

(And please delete this comment if you remove those from the story.)

up
Voting closed 1

As I thought about this horrible, awful man and what he got away with for decades. And I decided specifically to include that because we already knew he was raping children he was related to (it came up during his criminal proceedings) and the fact just completely drives home how awful he is.

When I read the sentence in the complaint that made the relationship clear, as I sat at my laptop in the dining room, I went "Oh my God!" loudly enough that my daughter, in the living room, went "What?!?"

I don't think it makes any more easier to identify the plaintiffs (people close to them probably already know, the rest of us? They're still "Does"), but again, just shows what a reprehensible man Rose is.

up
Voting closed 2

My concern was for their identities. I feel the same revulsion about that part of the facts.

up
Voting closed 1

Adam used to refer to his daughter as the kidlet. Is she finished with BU now?

up
Voting closed 1

I believe she went to UMass, Amherst.

up
Voting closed 2

/UMass ‘97

up
Voting closed 2

In this story the BPD leadership and BPPA looks as dirty as the 20th century Boston archdiocese; bullying victims to protect pedophiles. Hopefully they will receive the same amount of scrutiny.

And while at it, it would be great to revisit the case of officer John J. Mulligan. Then we can decide if this "hero" still deserves a memorial stone in front of the West Roxbury police station.

up
Voting closed 2

Took a while to find the context for what you say about Mulligan (most mentions of Mulligan are celebrating him).

It doesn’t matter what kind of scoundrel you are — rapist, liar and thief, murderer — the police, charged with enforcing the law, will overlook your transgressions, protect and celebrate you because you’re one of them. Not an environment that encourages or even tolerates any kind of accountability. (Kinda like the church!)

But his reputation in the department faltered in the years before his death.

In 1989, Mulligan was suspended after an internal investigation found he “double-billed” the force for some of his overtime shifts, according to the Globe.

In 1992, he was branded as a “problem officer” by the department, whose internal audit found he ranked fifth out of its 1,950 officers for having the most complaints filed against him. Mulligan was the subject of 24 misconduct investigations in his 27-year career.

And in 1986, Mulligan was mentioned in a federal corruption probe of the force, in which a drug dealer testified the detective was “among many officers who protected his operations in exchange for payoffs,” the Globe wrote following Mulligan’s death.

https://www.boston.com/news/crime/2020/11/11/sean-ellis-netflix-document...

up
Voting closed 2

Didn't Paul Evans (commissioner 1993-2003) leave BPD for good in 2003?

And then the complaint says that he is still hanging around in 2021 to "chill John Doe and Jane Doe’s substantive and procedural due process"? Wow; if this turns out to be true, there is a lot more digging to do on this case.

up
Voting closed 1

When the Rose allegations resurfaced in 2021, he talked to the Globe about the case.

up
Voting closed 2

Didn't Paul Evans (commissioner 1993-2003) exit BPD for good in 2003?

And then the complaint says that he is still hanging around in 2021 to "chill John Doe and Jane Doe’s substantive and procedural due process"? Wow; if this turns out to be true, there is a lot more digging to do on this case.

up
Voting closed 1

I grew up in an environment where my mother was regularly sexually abused by a man living on the same floor. This was an unusual rental arrangement. Her sisters and brothers knew that a non-relative lived on the same floor. My mother was also a person who livd with severe emotional trauma and so was both an easy target for predators and someone who would not ask for help (for fears of being persecuted by her relatives for other reasons).

None of her sisters, brothers, aunts or uncles can claim to have been ignorant of this setup. Nor could they deny the rule of thumb: Never leave a vulnerable woman with an unknown man. Famous plays have been based on this horror setup.

So it doesn't surprise me that people who were aware of Rose's criminality chose to ignore that his campaign of destroying the children he attacked.

Kicking Rose to the ground - and below - may have been seen as simply being too difficult. An attitude that rationalized thinking, "Someone else will deal with this." But with each person who knew kicking the can down the road Rose manages to work his way through destroying human beings.

Not to apply a non-sequitur but to make a larger point. The nearly 60,000 Americans killed in the Vietnam War died because this war was kicked down the can over and over until finally there was enough pressure to force a president (ironically Nixon) to admit defeat.

The same was part of the 11 million killed during the Holocaust. Refusing to acknowledge the obvious, playing the game of pretending this problem belongs to another.

up
Voting closed 1

Powerful story that must have been tough.

A lot of this in the BPD is with people who are long gone but this is what I think the main issue is/was. Evans and City Legal Council made the decision not to fire Rose based on their experience with other past practices where they knew if Rose fought back he would have more likely than not(or some other level of fact) gotten his job back and possibly sued the City.

Today the City fires first and pays out later because of the public backlash. The money isn't an issue anymore.

With Rose initially, the DA/DCF/Detectives knew they simply didn't have enough to charge him. But IA has a much lower burden of proof to simply come out and say that based on the preponderance of the evidence Rose sexually assaulted those kids and should be fired. Evans and Boston City Legal took those reports and simply decided there wasn't enough to fire him. So they let him stay. From this point the grapevine of workplace rumors was at full steam and everyone simply moved on and pretended like nothing happened. Like Daan alludes to, ignoring Rose may not have been the issue, but ignoring the victims was. And that is where the City is going to have to pay up imo.

up
Voting closed 1